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patmaquette

Ark Royal circa 1587.

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Fantastic, accurate, precise cannon (OK, culverin...)work.  I love what you are doing with this.

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HI Pat

Found your WIP and a fine one it is too! I see the similarity of build and current stage now.  I would have never attempted doing Tudor framework on stern gallery windows (lead work?) and think you were wise to leave them intact. The finished windows look fantastic and I have noted your technique.

How do you propose doing rigging?

 Your skills with an airbrush far surpass mine, i have hand painted everything so far with obvious deficiencies, and shall rely on the defence that period naval models don't need to look perfectly smooth like WWII aircraft!

Cheers

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On 27/12/2019 at 08:17, Pak75 said:

HI Pat

Found your WIP and a fine one it is too! I see the similarity of build and current stage now.  I would have never attempted doing Tudor framework on stern gallery windows (lead work?) and think you were wise to leave them intact. The finished windows look fantastic and I have noted your technique.

How do you propose doing rigging?

 Your skills with an airbrush far surpass mine, i have hand painted everything so far with obvious deficiencies, and shall rely on the defence that period naval models don't need to look perfectly smooth like WWII aircraft!

Cheers

Thank you @Pak75, @Murdo & @Ex-FAAWAFU for your kind comments.

Pak75, I have little experience of rigging a ship model so have been giving the topic some thought. I have gone so far as sketching out the rigging to help me get my thoughts straight and make sure I allowed sufficient numbers of bits, etc for tying off. I have also purchased various threads (some of which are elastic) to see which work best and look the most realistic.

The moulded ratlines supplied by Airfix are a bit wrinkled and I hope I can flatten them using an iron. If they survive that, I will probably attach these to the top of the lower mast sections first of all and then build each mast on the bench, including the sails.

My thoughts are to work the various ropes up from deck level to the masts, rather than from top down. I think I will have problems trying to tie off the ropes at deck level and will damage a lot of detail if I try to do it top down. 

It will be a while yet before I start the rigging as I want to add the details to the decks first of all, this includes casting the cannons and even adding some crew members!

 

Regarding airbrushing, I haven't needed to do any detail work with it. I used it for laying down primer, some pre-shading and for muting the tones on the deck planking. The planks themselves were painted by brush using the (faintly) raised lines in the plastic as a guide.

I started by sorting out my wood and sand coloured paints and brushed them onto a scrap piece of plastic duct left over from a job on the house. I decided to use only the acrylic ones in the end, not the enamels at the top of the photo.....

 

 

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I selected three tones to start with and applied them as randomly as possible to 50% of the planks. I found it necessary to apply a number of coats over the undercoat to get the colour to build up uniformly and solidly. I got confused as to what plank had been painted with what paint when I tried with more than three tones. Having got this first stage completed, I then picked three more tones and completed the rest of the planking. The tonal contrast between the planks was a bit too stark at the end, so I muted it by airbrushing a diluted wash over the surface, but this did not require precision, just careful laying down of numerous light coats until the contrast was as I wanted.

 

All the best and thanks to everyone for their interest,

Pat

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Hi everyone,

Work continues with painting the hull sides. As these had undergone a far amount of handling, they were given a clean and then an airbrushed coat of matt enamel varnish to provide a fresh key to the primered and pre-shaded areas done some time ago. The gun ports were masked off with rectangles of foam that were kept from that time. 

The planking above the water line was tackled in the same way as the deck, and that is to paint each plank separately using a range of sand and brown colours.....

 

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The pre-shading I had already airbrushed onto shaded regions - such as the bow beneath the beak and at the stern beneath the gallery and where the hull curves under towards the rudder - was used in combination with darker tones selected from the range to create shaded areas. Lighter tones were applied in areas more open to the light. 

 

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Painting started by selecting a colour and applying it to around 20% of the planks randomly chosen. Two or three coats of paint applied by brush to each plank was needed to build up a uniform colour. Earlier in the 16th century, planks were made by splitting trunks and finishing by adze and were fairly short at around 12 ft in length. Later in the century the planks were sawn and may have been longer. I made the planks at least 12 ft (1" on the model) long and staggered the ends between rows. I avoided putting joints in the planks above and below the gun ports, reckoning this would not have been done on the real ship. Airfix had engraved ends on some planks and so I made use of these when available.

Having applied the first colour, I selected another having a tone well distinct from the first. This was then applied to the next 20% of planks at random. This step was then repeated for the third and fourth colours, Remaining planks were then picked out in other tones as I fancied. The reason for approaching it this way is that I had problems previously trying to do multiple colours at the same time: it was all too easy to forget what colour you had applied where when building up the layers of paint, so a little more structured approach was called for and made the job a lot easier.

 

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Once done, the ends of the planks were emphasized using pointy tipped brown crayons before all the planking was given light airbushed coats of Citadel Seraphim Sepia to harmonise and give the tones some warmth. This has been my key discovery in getting an attractive wood finish.

 

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The next task was to shade the white areas of the hull. This is where things went wrong. I'll write a separate post for that.

 

Thank you for your interest in reading this and please let me know if you have any questions or comments,

Cheers,

Pat

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On 30/01/2020 at 12:04, Ex-FAAWAFU said:

Stunning work.

 

On 30/01/2020 at 12:14, Courageous said:

Yep, simply stunning.

 

Stuart

Guys, an enormous thanks for your kind words - much appreciated! 

 

 

Once completed, the model is intended to be put on display at the foot of a staircase in a local museum. It will be viewed from beneath and one side. I felt I could not leave the large expanse of white beneath the water line looking so pristine - it needed shading to bring out the hull shape and make it look more interesting.  

I find white the most difficult to shade. I knew I had to do it subtly and with care. I knew I was going to cock it up and I did.......

 

I opted to airbrush light coats of The Army Painter Warpaints Dark Tone ink along the planks using loose masks to get a hard edge on one side of the plank and a feathered edge on the other. Things did not go well both with trying to keep the masks in place (I had a friend holding the masks while I did the spraying, but four hands in such a small space was too much) and the ink sputtering and blocking in the airbrush. Shading did not come out uniformly and was splotchy in places. I continued working on it and the result came out far too stark...

 

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My recovery plan was to spray over the shaded area with lighter paint and then try again using a paint brush. The upper half of the hull was masked off to protect it until the job was done.

 

I started by collecting together my pure and off-white paints and spraying splotches onto a piece of scrap plastic piping duct.....

 

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I ended up with 11 paints to select from......

 

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From this exercise, I selected Hataka A043 Insignia White for spraying over the shaded area, followed by Game Color 72101 Off-White for shaded areas closer to the keel.

 

The planks were then brush painted using mixes of the following paints (from light to dark)....

Hataka A043 Insignia White

Xtracrylix XA1141 White

Xtracrylix XA1137 Light Gull Grey

The Army Painter Warpaint Dark Tone ink.

 

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The Frog low-tack masking tape was removed using great care, however some paint lifted from the "wood" areas above the waterline.....

 

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I'll repair that later when I come to paint the masts. 

 

The result is acceptable enough to press on to the next stage, which is to add some of the detail parts to the deck.

 

Many thanks for tuning in and I hope you are finding the build of interest. I'm certainly enjoying myself with this old kit.

 

Pat

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Fantastic looking model of a fantastic looking ship.

I just love that complex colour scheme - not many other maritime  subjects allow such a riot of colour. 

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19 hours ago, Martian Hale said:

I am enjoying this immensely.

 

Martian 👽

Great to hear, Martian - many thanks for following!

18 hours ago, Bandsaw Steve said:

Fantastic looking model of a fantastic looking ship.

I just love that complex colour scheme - not many other maritime  subjects allow such a riot of colour. 

Thanks, Steve. Yes - this has to be the most colourful subject I've done. I'll be posting some photos of the little cabin that goes on the quarterdeck later - that has even more colour per square inch!

 

Time to turn to the deadeyes and chainwales*

* Part of the fun I've had with this build is finding out what the various bits and bobs are called. If you aren't sure yourself, don't worry and read on as it will hopefully become clear what I'm referring to! Those of you who are familiar with these things - please will you correct me if I make mistakes.........

* It seems "chainwales" are more often called "channels". I prefer the former term, though.

 

The kit parts needed a lot of cleaning up. Some deadeyes had broken off but the pieces could be found in the box and glued back on. Many of what should be metal supports running down from the chainwale to the hull side had also broken away or broke away during cleaning up as the plastic is really brittle. I'll fit replacements after the chainwales are glued in place.

I had also identified that some additional rigging tying off points would be needed, so extended the chainwales where necessary and drilled out holes in readiness. Grooves were cut on the reverse side of the top deadeyes for the shrouds to slot into before gluing, but it may be too difficult to actually do this when the time comes.

Dry fitting of the chainwales to check the fit against the hull sides was essential. Material was pared away to close up gaps. However, large gaps at the forward end of the foremast chainwale needed to be packed out with plastic card and then whittled to shape.

 

Gap between forward chainwale and hull side.....

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Packed out with plastic card and shaped.....

 

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Main and mizzen mast chainwales dry fitted (I don't plan to use the ones for the fourth mast).....

 

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I toyed with the idea of scratch building the deadeyes as the rope detail is only crudely represented on the mouldings. However, I decided to see what could be done with the kit parts first of all, as scratch building replacements will not be a trivial task.

Painting commenced with dark brown over a primer coat. Mid brown was sprayed on the outward and upward facing surfaces and a coat of Klear brushed over the rope areas.....

 

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A wash of Citadel Nuln Oil was then applied over the lanyards between the upper and lower deadeyes.....

 

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In hindsight, I should have tidied the deadeyes with some paint before proceeding, however I went straight ahead with outlining the metal band around the lower deadeyes with Vallejo grey-black. The plastic really is too wide between the lower deadeyes and the chainwales. I had trimmed back the worst cases but left sufficient material so it was not weakened. The metal bands from the deadeyes to the chainwales thus had to be shown by thin lines of paint. Some wood colour was left outside of the band, but this is not too noticeable on the finished part.

 

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Painting continued with outlining the top deadeyes and adding some dots to represent holes for the lanyards using grey-black. Highlights were picked out on the top edges of the deadeyes and on the lanyards as they pass into the top deadeye....

 

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They have now been glued in place and don't look too bad. I think that scratch building replacements is not worth the time and potential pitfalls, what are your thoughts?.....

 

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Cheers,

Pat

Edited by patmaquette

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Looking better all the time. 

10 hours ago, patmaquette said:

They have now been glued in place and don't look too bad. I think that scratch building replacements is not worth the time and potential pitfalls, what are your thoughts?.....

I'll let you know when I get round to doing Bounty.

 

Stuart

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1 hour ago, Courageous said:

Looking better all the time. 

I'll let you know when I get round to doing Bounty.

 

Stuart

Hi Stuart,

The Bounty kit is somewhat larger scale than Revenge. Maybe the rope detail is better in your kit.

My fallback idea if the painting approach did not work was to remove the surface detail and then glue some short lengths of wire on top to represent the lanyards. I think this would work and be easier than making from scratch.

All the best,

Pat 

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I agree with you that the effort of scratch-building replacements is definitely not worth the marginal gain.  

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11 hours ago, Ex-FAAWAFU said:

I agree with you that the effort of scratch-building replacements is definitely not worth the marginal gain.  

Thanks, Crisp, I much appreciate and value your views. I have been avidly following your Ark Royal and Swordfish build. I did ask myself "what would Crisp do?" when thinking about these deadeyes. I found it a difficult decision, but my deadline is getting close and I am keen to get onto something new as I've been on this one far longer than I hoped.

 

Bit by bit, I'm tidying up some of my painting. The very tip of the beak has a circular feature.....

 

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It's somewhat plain so I thought I would try painting in some detail. I am pleased how it turned out. Remember how zoomed in the photos are, it really looks a lot better under normal viewing!

I made the centre to look in relief. A circle of dark brown paint was applied first of all. Then a semicircle of mid brown of smaller size was popped into the upper half. Finally, a light sand paint highlight was applied: a spot towards the top of the semicircle and a thin line around the lower half of the dark brown circle. The same paint was used to highlight the top of the beak.

 

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(Sorry the last photo is a bit out of focus).

 

Stern Gallery.

The gallery deck had been painted at the same time as the hull.

 

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The side and rear panels were painted to match the design on the hull sides. The centre panels on the rear were painted grey-black as per the transom. A dark wash was applied around each panel and the various motifs. The motifs themselves were given a dark undercoat: mid grey for white fleur-des-lys, hull red for the petals of the tudor rose, with black-green for the leaves between the petals and Darkstar Antique Bronze for the centres. This paint was also used on the E R and the decorated ribs between the hull and gallery sides.

 

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The motifs were then detailed. I chose to shadow one side of the fleur des lys - a bit arty but I like it! Darkstar brass was used for the gallery ribs and centres of the tudor roses, with Darkstar gold braid for highlights.

 

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I'll continue in a separate post.......

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Helmsman's cabin (or whatever it may be).

This is a five-part assembly that benefited from care in assembly. After much dry fitting and fettling, a pair of cabin end + side sub-assemblies were glued together squarely and set aside to dry. They were then assembled together and left to set before working on the roof. Material was pared away until the best fit was achieved. Some filler was needed.

In a similar way, the cabin was test fitted to the deck and trimmed until a reasonable fit was achieved....

 

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The cabin was primered and then the wood picked out in various tones as done elsewhere (all photos magnified to an embarrassing amount!).

 

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It was then washed using Citadel Seraphim Sepia.....

 

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I then attempted to paint a decorative triangular design down the sides, replicating that on the hull sides. It was too small to get neat, so for now I blocked in the panels with one colour of the design......

 

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....and then pressed on with highlighting and shading the roof...

 

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The cabin was then given a gloss coat of Klear and the decorative design completed using minuscule triangles of decal in red and black. These were sealed under a further coat of Klear before a pin wash was applied, followed by a matt coat. 

 

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The door and window details were then picked out using acrylics. The windows were given the same treatment as used for the windows on the transom (see post 104).

 

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The gallery and cabin, along with other detail, were now attached to the hull.....

 

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Thank you for looking everyone,

Pat

 

 

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Just when we think this fan’t get any better, you go all trompe d’oeuil on the forepeak... and 100% nail it!  Your painting techniques are fantastic.

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As stated: "Your painting techniques are fantastic". I couldn't put it better!

 

It's such a gaudily painted ship it looks like a (model) painters nightmare!

 

:clap:

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I have to agree with all who have said it repeatedly, this is stunning work. I hadn't checked out this thread for some time but was prompted to have a quick catch up by a comment by @Ex-FAAWAFU in his excellent Ark Royal build (one of the floating runway versions).

 

Not only are you illustrating some excellent modelling skills in the build, the paintwork is so colourful, and replicates wood with incredible realism.

 

Gobsmacked!

 

Terry

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On 04/02/2020 at 08:46, Ex-FAAWAFU said:

Just when we think this fan’t get any better, you go all trompe d’oeuil on the forepeak... and 100% nail it!  Your painting techniques are fantastic.

Thank you, Crisp, glad you like it and it was fun to do. Also thanks for making me aware of what the technique is called. I wouldn't call my painting techniques fantastic, though, more like experimenting / blundering along!

On 05/02/2020 at 00:50, Murdo said:

As stated: "Your painting techniques are fantastic". I couldn't put it better!

 

It's such a gaudily painted ship it looks like a (model) painters nightmare!

 

:clap:

Thank you, Murdo. Adding the two "turrets" to the stern greatly increased the painted areas. I think the black and orange triangles on the very top row are a pattern too far, so I may do it all in black. It does look eye catching, I must admit! 

On 05/02/2020 at 08:00, Courageous said:

What they ⬆️ said...fantastic.

 

Stuart

Thank you Stuart, much appreciated!

On 05/02/2020 at 09:51, Terry1954 said:

I have to agree with all who have said it repeatedly, this is stunning work. I hadn't checked out this thread for some time but was prompted to have a quick catch up by a comment by @Ex-FAAWAFU in his excellent Ark Royal build (one of the floating runway versions).

 

Not only are you illustrating some excellent modelling skills in the build, the paintwork is so colourful, and replicates wood with incredible realism.

 

Gobsmacked!

 

Terry

Thank you Terry. I'm learning a lot doing this build, which is the main reason that I am happy to keep working on this model over so many weeks and months. One very new thing is moulding and casting parts. What seemed very daunting at first has actually turned out to be fun and rewarding, so here is an update on where I have got......

 

With work on the hull largely completed, I have been working on the masts, sails and casting some cannons. 

Going back to post 125, I had made masters of the cannons & carriages. A also needed some full versions of the 18 pdr cannon to go on the main deck and also some additional and modified gun port doors.

 

I was able to do everything I wanted using single, rather than the more complicated 2-part moulds.

 

I'll not mention the various abortive attempts I had in making the moulds, but just talk about where I am now. I am very pleased with my first results but would appreciate any suggestions you have on doing things better!

 

I am using 1-2-1 Easymould from DWR Plastics for the moulds. I purchased their small 250g pack of "soft" grade (you can also get "extra soft" and "medium" grades, but I thought I would try the middle one) which cost 7.25 GBP. excl p&p. The material has a long enough pot life, pours well and is mixed in equal parts, rather than the awkward 2-4% hardener to resin of some other 2-part mixes. Shelf life is one year.

 

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Making the moulds is fairly straightforward. You have enough working time so long as you don't get distracted. The items you need are:

- Thin disposable gloves,

- A weigh scale with at least 0.1 gram resolution and 100 gram capacity.

- A small cup for mixing the materials

- A stirrer.

- A pointy object to help remove air bubbles in the mould.

 

Using the moulding material:

Make a rough calculation of how much material you will need and then add a cc or two to make sure you have enough.

Place the mixing pot on the weigh scale and zero the display.

Pour Part A into the mixing pot until you have half the total quantity you need. Take care to minimize trapping air. Note the weight.

Now pour in the same weight of Part B. Again take care to avoid trapping air.

I have been using a wooden coffee stirrer with its end cut off square to do an initial mix of the two parts, making sure the Part A and B components on the walls and base of the cup get pulled into the bulk of the mix. Wood is probably not a good choice, though, when trying to keep air out of the mix. I then complete the mix using a smooth plastic rod, teasing out any of the bigger air bubbles as you go.

 

Whilst it is quite easy to do the mixing and you don't need to rush, do be aware that: if you don't mix thoroughly the material will not set; if you mix too aggressively you will trap air; if you stir for too long the mix will start to stiffen and so not flow so well in the mould. 

 

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Then pour the mix into the mould until it is half way up the master. I pour around edges of the mould rather than over the master, as this would trap air around them. Tilt the mould around to encourage the material to flow all around the undersides of the master to flush out trapped air. Use the pointy object to coax away any stubborn air bubbles. The pointy object I use is a microbrush with the brush part cut off.

Add more material until the mould is full. Continue to search for and remove air bubbles. I found it impossible to remove them all, but the moulds worked fine nevertheless.

Leave the mould to set for a few hours (I left mine overnight).

 

Here are some photos showing how the moulds were made for the cannons:

 

The masters were held in a strip of plastic (in black). I found a clear plastic lid that was just the right size for the job (but making some other  way of closing the mould can be done with simple materials and a hot glue gun)...

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The mould fluid has been poured in....

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As many air bubbles as possible were teased out using a pointy tool, but many can be still be seen in the finished mould (bear in mind these are really zoomed in)......

 

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Bubbles in the muzzles were something that I should have noticed and dealt with.....

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The cannons above would be placed in the gun ports. However, there are eight 18-pdr culverins on carriages that will be visible on the main deck and so I made a master to include the breach detail. A separate mould was made for this (along with some more 6-pdr sakers).....

 

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A scalpel was used to slice through the right hand end of the mould to make it easier to remove the 18-pdr castings.

 

I also needed some larger sized gun port covers so made some masters by adding plastic strip to a couple of the kit ones. These were placed face up into a plastic cup and held in place with Tacky Wax, along with some spare carriage wheels.

 

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Gun port cover masters with a tab & a couple of hinges added.......

 

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Placed into a cup for moulding.....

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Completed mould....

 

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A similar approach was taken for the carriages:

 

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I'll cover making the castings in a separate post.

 

Please let me know if you have any comments, advice, hints and tips, etc.

Thank you once again for your "likes", feedback and for reading,

Pat

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Your moulding is fine.

Terrible lot of air bubbles. It might be the type of rubber though

I use the ubiquitous cocktail stick for my pointy tool. I too use coffee stirrers for stirring the mixes.

One thing I have which helps to get rid of air bubbles is a jewellery ' ultra sonic' cleaner. Nothing sonic about it - it just vibrates at a high speed, This encourages the bubbles to rise to the surface where I pull them to the side with my pointy tool

 

eg:  https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Cordless-Ultrasonic-Ultra-Sonic-Cleaner-For-Watch-Coins-jewelry-Ring-T9B7/303140423609?epid=1352784143&hash=item469493c7b9:g:CCkAAOSwiNBcyR~2

 

Depending on where you get your moulding resin and the type, you can get pigments to add to it. I get my moulding supplies from mbfg in Belfast - https://www.mbfg.co.uk/?gclid=CjwKCAiAj-_xBRBjEiwAmRbqYgURM1JU7FAI-5YsuD_bPc7PGun8zRdU8H28aXuL20Js5Zlj_2Mi_RoCmVQQAvD_BwE

 

Basically there is Polyurethane and Polyester resins. For polyester mbfg keeps metallic pigments. The bronze would do your cannon well - https://www.mbfg.co.uk/polyester-metallic.html

mbfg will supply by post

I'm there tomorrow to get some pigments for some items I'm working on. One I'll be getting is the copper-bronze

 

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18 hours ago, Courageous said:

Very informative Pat, thanks.

 

Stuart

Thank you, Stuart. Hopefully someone having a try at moulding for the first time will find it of help and along with contributions from more experienced folks, such as @Black Knight message above will get them off to a flying start. The main discovery for me was that simple, single piece moulds are useful for casting lots of useful bits and bobs and can be done easily and at little outlay.

All the best,

Pat

 

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18 hours ago, Black Knight said:

Your moulding is fine.

Terrible lot of air bubbles. It might be the type of rubber though

I use the ubiquitous cocktail stick for my pointy tool. I too use coffee stirrers for stirring the mixes.

One thing I have which helps to get rid of air bubbles is a jewellery ' ultra sonic' cleaner. Nothing sonic about it - it just vibrates at a high speed, This encourages the bubbles to rise to the surface where I pull them to the side with my pointy tool

 

eg:  https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Cordless-Ultrasonic-Ultra-Sonic-Cleaner-For-Watch-Coins-jewelry-Ring-T9B7/303140423609?epid=1352784143&hash=item469493c7b9:g:CCkAAOSwiNBcyR~2

 

Depending on where you get your moulding resin and the type, you can get pigments to add to it. I get my moulding supplies from mbfg in Belfast - https://www.mbfg.co.uk/?gclid=CjwKCAiAj-_xBRBjEiwAmRbqYgURM1JU7FAI-5YsuD_bPc7PGun8zRdU8H28aXuL20Js5Zlj_2Mi_RoCmVQQAvD_BwE

 

Basically there is Polyurethane and Polyester resins. For polyester mbfg keeps metallic pigments. The bronze would do your cannon well - https://www.mbfg.co.uk/polyester-metallic.html

mbfg will supply by post

I'm there tomorrow to get some pigments for some items I'm working on. One I'll be getting is the copper-bronze

 

Thank you @Black Knight for your very helpful observations and suggestions. I had been thinking about getting an ultrasonic cleaner for cleaning kit parts, so I'll go ahead and get one now and use it for de-aerating as well.

I've almost completed all the casting work now and will make a post about it either later today or tomorrow. Interestingly, one of the components has to be shaken thoroughly before mixing, so de-aerating the mix before pouring may give a much better result.

 

Best regards,

Pat 

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