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tell me about the good and the bad of 1/350 and 1/700


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On 7/7/2019 at 3:42 AM, Chewbacca said:

For years I have sworn by 1/600 as the ideal scale for ship modelling although I strongly suspect that was largely driven by my formative modelling years in that scale in the 1970s.  Large enough that you can get a reasonable amount of detail (especially these days with the amount of PE that is available) but small enough that they don't need half a room to display.  I find 1/700 just that little bit too small. 

 

 

After about 1.5 weeks of building a 1/700 and 1/350 kit side by side, I'm finding myself to be largely in agreement with you..

 

The 1/700 feels just a touch too small. The Flyhawk kit Im working on is composed almost entirely of astonishingly miniscule parts, and I've already had a few ping off into the ether. I scratch built copies of the plastic bits I lost, but a piece of PE railing that went off is gone forever.

 

I put some railings on a few of the small decks, and they were about as fussy as I expected. Not hard, but irritating.

 

The 1/350 kit has been much easier to build and far less of a strain on my eyes (even with optivisor) but it seems to lack the "soul" of the smaller model.

 

Feels like 1/600 or 1/500 would be the Goldilocks scale for me (like 1/48 in armor), but aside from a handful of ancient Airfix amf.Niichimo kits, I don't know if either scale is still viable.

 

IMG-20190710-222805698.jpg


IMG-20190711-095234765-HDR.jpg

 

 

OOooof! Still getting used to the fact that everything in 1/700 looks like the dog's lunch when seen through macro close-up.  Or maybe I'm just not any good at it. 

Edited by SoftScience
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3 hours ago, Jamie @ Sovereign Hobbies said:

FYI there was planking on the deck around B turret on Exeter :)

Yeah yeah. Its got many issues. I've been following your thread. Its my first ship, so I'm not going to get too hung up on historical accuracy. I'm more interested in achieving clean lines and the complex looks of a ship at this stage. 

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On 7/9/2019 at 1:06 PM, MikeR said:

 

 

 

All of these combined with the plans in the Burt and Shipcraft books should give enough info to reconstruct the pattern with a fair degree of accuracy. That the scheme was more-or-symetrical simplifies things  too!

 

Mike.:)

Mike,

 

One quick follow up question to get your thoughts.  The Shipcraft renderings show the early 1942 scheme having Y turret as the darker colour (507B), but my analysis of your photos seem to show that is it X turret that is darker.  

 

Thoughts?

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1 hour ago, zed said:

Mike,

 

One quick follow up question to get your thoughts.  The Shipcraft renderings show the early 1942 scheme having Y turret as the darker colour (507B), but my analysis of your photos seem to show that is it X turret that is darker.  

 

Thoughts?

Go with the photos - the two of Valiant on page 138 of the Burt volume show her sometime in '41 (side view) and October '42 (stern view). Both show X turret as the darker of the two, although the side view suffers from the sun angle causing glare on the turret face giving the impression that it's lighter, when it wasn't.

 

Mike.:)

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A few more days in and I'm really not feeling it for the 1/700 model. It is going okay, but it has been pretty stressful. The 1/350 build has been a lot more relaxing, despite Trumpeter's errors. I just finished rigging the funnels on it, and should be reaching the point where I begin adding some of the innermost railings. 

I also picked up Airfix's 1/600 HMS Belfast to see if 1/600 is indeed the scale for me. So far I've only drilled out scuttles on the hull, and I'm waiting for the WEM PE set to arrive. If nothing else, that kit scores high on nostalgia. 
 

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 7/16/2019 at 4:48 PM, SoftScience said:

A few more days in and I'm really not feeling it for the 1/700 model. It is going okay, but it has been pretty stressful. The 1/350 build has been a lot more relaxing, despite Trumpeter's errors. I just finished rigging the funnels on it, and should be reaching the point where I begin adding some of the innermost railings. 

I also picked up Airfix's 1/600 HMS Belfast to see if 1/600 is indeed the scale for me. So far I've only drilled out scuttles on the hull, and I'm waiting for the WEM PE set to arrive. If nothing else, that kit scores high on nostalgia. 
 

 

I've always said 1/600 is the perfect ship scale - not too big, not too small, and just 'looks' right. Trouble is its a dead scale but the kits that are out there are fun and can be tarted up with after market and etch, or download some old Airfix magazines and try out the suggested conversions.

 

Belfast is a good 1/600, the older ones are very basic. Airfix's Prinz Eugen is a delight too, my favourite model ever. It does help if you like scratchbuilding details though. And the older the issue the better - the recent ones are very soft.

 

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  • 3 months later...
On July 10, 2019 at 6:03 PM, SoftScience said:

After about 1.5 weeks of building a 1/700 and 1/350 kit side by side, I'm finding myself to be largely in agreement with you..

 

The 1/700 feels just a touch too small. The Flyhawk kit Im working on is composed almost entirely of astonishingly miniscule parts, and I've already had a few ping off into the ether. I scratch built copies of the plastic bits I lost, but a piece of PE railing that went off is gone forever.

 

I put some railings on a few of the small decks, and they were about as fussy as I expected. Not hard, but irritating.

 

The 1/350 kit has been much easier to build and far less of a strain on my eyes (even with optivisor) but it seems to lack the "soul" of the smaller model.

 

Feels like 1/600 or 1/500 would be the Goldilocks scale for me (like 1/48 in armor), but aside from a handful of ancient Airfix amf.Niichimo kits, I don't know if either scale is still viable.

If your intention is to build a collection I have always thought keeping the scale consistent is a good idea.  It is nice to see models alone but displayed with other models it adds quite a bit to see them in proportion to each other.  The only suggestion I would offer is consider the actual size of various models in 1/700 and 1/350th.  If you would have any submarines in the collection they will end up very tiny in 1/700 scale, which would point you towards the larger 1/350, where you are going.  The only drawback I think of 1/350 might be if the kits at the larger end (battleships or carrier) end up to big to display buts it's a good problem because they are really impressive.  You can however use different scales for different types of subjects, such as 1/350 for ships and 1/144 for subs.  Depends in part on how you would like to display your collection.  

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  • 5 months later...
On 7/1/2019 at 10:01 AM, ShipbuilderMN said:

I quite like scale of 32 feet to 1 inch (1:384).     They are small enough for normal sized houses or flats, and don't require any high degree of patience to build.    This on, the steamer Politician, is shown in a Utube presentation from block of wood to completion.    It took a total of 58 hours to build, spread over a few weeks.   All timed on a stopwatch.   Building costs, virtually nothing.    But being scratchbuilt, it would not be a popular choice for a model, but I was never much good with kits!   https://youtu.be/dbKlh_aa9r4

Hello,

I prefer also 1:400 because they are not too large and there are PE Sets railings ladders available. 1:700 it is a little bit to difficultfor me for these

parts,  I am now building a few Freighters inspired by your builds. I really admire your models of the old steam freighters!

I will trie to build SS Automedon one of my favorites.

 

regards

 

Andreas

 

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Hello Andreas,

Thanks.    I don't have any problems with parts because I make all my own.   I rarely come on model ship  forums these days, mainly due to lack of interst in models of merchant ships,   My main activities are now on Facebook with my  "Merchant Ships in Miniature" group that now has over 3,500 members and is thriving.    As I get older, (now 76) I find that it easier to move onto a slightly larger scale such as 25 feet to 1 inch  (1/300) or even larger for smaller ships.     Currently building a 900-ton barque at 20 feet to one inch, hull length about 7 inches.    This one, the barque Gulf Stream, shown on UTube, was badly damaged on its way to Belgium last year, and although I have repaired it, it has limited my activities greatly, because I am no longer prepared to send them out by courier, following a number of breakages.      https://youtu.be/RkzuzNRI2Qw     Consequently they are starting to pile up, so when we run out of space, that will be the end of it all, but that is a while off yet.    

Bob

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2 hours ago, ShipbuilderMN said:

Hello Andreas,

Thanks.    I don't have any problems with parts because I make all my own.   I rarely come on model ship  forums these days, mainly due to lack of interst in models of merchant ships,   My main activities are now on Facebook with my  "Merchant Ships in Miniature" group that now has over 3,500 members and is thriving.    As I get older, (now 76) I find that it easier to move onto a slightly larger scale such as 25 feet to 1 inch  (1/300) or even larger for smaller ships.     Currently building a 900-ton barque at 20 feet to one inch, hull length about 7 inches.    This one, the barque Gulf Stream, shown on UTube, was badly damaged on its way to Belgium last year, and although I have repaired it, it has limited my activities greatly, because I am no longer prepared to send them out by courier, following a number of breakages.      https://youtu.be/RkzuzNRI2Qw     Consequently they are starting to pile up, so when we run out of space, that will be the end of it all, but that is a while off yet.    

Bob

 

Hello Bob, I have just joined the Facebook group. What a great load of merchant ships there are on show! Highly recommeneded for anyone on Facebook with an interest in merchant ships.

 

All the best,

 

Ray

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You are welcome.   I was amazed at the response and active participation when I first set up the group, and I don't dominate it in any way.    The main rule is merchant ships only, but fleet auxliliaries and fishing boats etc still come under the "commercial" banner, so are welcome as well.    Some members advertise their models for sale, and that is OK, although I don't myself.     The fact that it is confined to merchant ships, means I am not "stepping on the toes" of other maritime model forums who mainly prefer ships of war!!

Bob

 

 

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The classic question - the choice between 1:700 or 1:350 is often considered from the building perspective - but to me the more important factor is related to viewing the finished masterpiece(s), both by yourself and others. Although now much of the viewing is done on-line with photos so this perhaps all changes again. 

 

1:350 is generally limiting to less models or to mainly smaller ships (space and time constraints), but more detail and therefore character can easily be added and viewed, so also depends what you want with the overall collection.

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