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Dee1234

Forgot to Pre Shade

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Hi,

 

I am new to modelling and was building my F-14 1/48 Tomcat , primed and airbrush painted and was about to put some decals on it after applying a coat of future and then the Flory Dark dirt wash. But I realized after reading online that I should have pre shaded it as well which is one step I have missed.

 

I guess there is not much I can do now unless I remove the Future polish , pre shade (and maybe post shade) and reapply the main fuselage colour? 

 

also to add I was trying to copy this F-14 so not sure if it has been pre shaded?

 

 

Edited by Dee1234

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IMHO I don't think it has preshade on it, I don't see post-shade either... only some panel-lining with oilpaint or flory washes and maybe some pastels. 

 

With preshade you'll see more an effect like this:

http://hamfisted-modeller.blogspot.com/2013/08/148-hasegawa-f-14b-tomcat-part-vi.html

 

The panel on top looks like it had some pre-shade, but I suspect it is the wash that shines a bit through...

 

 

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Pre-shade isn't a mandatory step, and after a while back in the hobby I stopped using it for the most part.  These days I spray on the base colour, and then add a little lightening to it, be it white, grey, a lighter shade of the same colour, and then do a bit of colour modulation with that.  You have to keep fine control of the amount of paint you're unleashing, but after a little practice you get into it and it gives you the opportunity to escape from the chequered pattern that can sometimes happen with pre-shade.  Think about where the light is falling, where weathering would occur and remember that it's on a small scale.  The same would go for corrosion protection and paint patching - think small :)

 

If you're using Flory wash, make sure you have a good smooth gloss finish too, as it can sometimes be hard to remove from the less shiny paint near wing roots and around details. :yes:

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Personally I would leave it as it is and try pre-shading on a future project. That is speaking from bitter experience, I've made paint jobs considerably worse by trying to correct perceived errors. 

Roger.  

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thanks all for the replies I will leave it as it as got a F-18 in progress that I can try the pre shading on

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Well there’s no rule requiring pre-shade.  I’ve never done it.  Unless your main colour painting is very thin, pre-shade won’t show anyway.

cheers

Will

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IMHO pre-shading is vastly over-rated. Much the same effects can be achieved with dry-brushing and/or pastels with a little practice. Dry-brushing in particular can be used for a wide range of similar (and just-as-subtle) effects, with a more 'controllable' application.

But don't beat yourself up, in any case. We've all occasionally 'overlooked a step' due to distraction, enthusiasm to move a project along, or sheer forgetfulness. :penguin:

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I agree with it being overrated... as I see it, it is a tool, for a more artistic outcome then realistic. But so many techniques are promoted and taken as mandatory, albeit being only a mere tool to realise a certain effect... and what effect you want to achieve will decide which "tools" to use, and not vice versa...

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1 hour ago, Silenoz said:

I agree with it being overrated... as I see it, it is a tool, for a more artistic outcome then realistic. But so many techniques are promoted and taken as mandatory, albeit being only a mere tool to realise a certain effect... and what effect you want to achieve will decide which "tools" to use, and not vice versa...

Life's too short, and if you look at real aircraft, they don't show every panel line, in fact very few, as drag is eliminated as much as possible by smooth surfaces, not over emphasised trenches.

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Be careful, for you often can see panel lines at reasonable distances (say 100 feet.  From personal experience on a Hercules. Consider three different levels.  The largest and most visible are gaps between moving parts.  The second are around removable panels.  The third and least visible are around fixed panels.  The older the aircraft the the more visible these will be - I'm referring here to design age rather than wear and tear but that may also be relevant.

 

However always be subtle.  You will never see aircraft with what appear to be dark broad lines for a Noughts and Crosses game, nor blotches imitating a mottle camouflage.

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I knew this topic would garner attention from those folks that don't like pre-shade, modulation, or whatever name you use for this artistic technique.  I'd caution against using one rule for every model you make, and try out different techniques from time-to-time, as not all aircraft were pristine 100% of the time, neither were they all beaten-up ruined hulks.  If you used colour modulation of any kind on an in-service Red Arrow or Thunderbird (not the Anderson one), you'd open yourself up to a bit of chiding, but equally if you portrayed a Malta defender Spit at the end of its service with glistening paintwork, you'd be just as "wrong".  however, build primarily for you and if you want a grotty Red Arrow, build one with relish, but it's probably best to tell people you don't care for accuracy if you elect to show it on t'internet, as you know how offended some folks can get if you don't do it their way :)

 

A lot of model builders these days carry out their work as a form of art, and appreciate that their work doesn't look 100% realistic, and that's cool.  It's a hobby after all.  Engraved panel lines are way over scale and often inappropriate, as are 3" thick injection moulded canopies, aerials and trailing edges for the most part, so in the end we're just building as good a representation of the source vehicle as we're able.  A key element of any hobby is enjoyment, so do just that.  Have fun, enjoy yourself and do so without harming or upsetting anyone else, and you'll have reached a good place. :yes:

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Well said. I'm just starting out with an airbrush. It's not as easy as it's made out to be. I'm getting some decent results after a few coats. But by no means perfect. But I'm having fun practicing, I could always come back and do a better job of paint jobs at a later date. Or preserve my work and see how I've improved. 

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Like others have replied, pre shading is not the be all end all need in finishing I have seen some results that completely ruining a well built model and totally bely an authentic finish... I liken it to an aircraft having flown through a coal mine shaft! 

Concentrate on getting good results before venturing to over heavy weathering.

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I have used three different techniques

1. "Pre shading"  Pros-time efficient, Cons-like mentioned you have to do very thin layers and if its a multi color camo pattern very hard to transition. 

2. "Charcoal sticks & Vallejo weathering pencils and pigments"- I sand off some charcoal material and use a small thin brush to accent panels and soiled areas Pros- excellent control and you can get a light or dark effect over three color camouflage and decals even a finish coat. I recently re weathered an AV-8B that was 5 years old. Cons-difficult to remove time consuming. The Vallejo weathering pencils come in a variety pack of 26-30 including metallic colors you can draw super fine lines then blur them with a damp brush color combination and effects are endless worth the investment.

3. "Washes" Pros-easy to use most washes are a ready use product quick to apply very realistic. Cons-working the wash after it has been applied to get the desired effect takes some technique and skill to get it blended/softened without changing the surrounding area.

 

On my feed I have an example of the Pre-shading I did on a four color camouflage pattern called "Desert Hawk" as a test it was very challenging as I realized I had to basically paint the model twice to get the pre-shading to show through properly I would not do it again. Also an example of 100% charcoal weathering on my AV-8B, F-18 and A-10. The "Found on road dead" truck was all pigments and washes. 

 

In the end you can always combine several techniques to no one is better than the other. I recently read an article from a master modeller on over weathering which I see so much of. Look at your walk around photos and inspect the weathered areas you should not be pre shading every panel and rivet its just not realistic each part of an aircraft is subjected to different exposures to the environment and maintenance.

 

My preference is model washes then picking up the fine details like edges, streaks and chips with the weathering pencils.

 

Good luck in you modeling endeavours.

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Actually pre-shading is not a "should" thing, it's entirely depends. One can compensate that by post-shading or with pigments even. It all depends on your look and expectations from the finished model. Don't stick with that so much imho.

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Don't go by what everyone does and develop your own style. Neither pre shading , nor post shading nor weathering are mandatory steps. A model looks great  even in factory fresh paint job . F-14 tomcat especially is a type that often falls victim to utterly hideous attempts at weathering . That is not the case with the model you used as a guide - it is beautiful !

That said , if you wish to go for paint variation , even then , pre shading is not a mandatory step and said effect can be equally achieved by post shading which in my personal opinion is a more controllable technique as well. 

One thing you must be prepared for is that it takes time to develop a vision and mastery with the airbrush . I have been modelling for 4 years , built around 80 models and still try out new techniques . There is no end to this and it is all up to you how much you wish to invest in this .  

PS: you cannot always tell if a model has been pre shaded from pics . Simply because a camera is highly unlikely to capture a subtle pre shade effect properly.  

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13 minutes ago, Basuroy said:

One thing you must be prepared for is that it takes time to develop a vision and mastery with the airbrush . I have been modelling for 4 years , built around 80 models and still try out new techniques . There is no end to this and it is all up to you how much you wish to invest in this .  

I've been modelling for over 50 years and still try out new techniques. Why copy things slavishly? Develop the skills that suit you best. There are a multiple of transferrable skills that can be adopted from other modelling genres, you just have to find out what works for you.

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