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SoftScience

How do you say in your English?

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Posted (edited)
On 5/16/2019 at 5:27 PM, Michou said:

This quiz reminds me of a similar quiz which the BBC had last year:
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20180205-which-british-accent-is-closest-to-your-own
 

Uh oh. Sunderland !    (never been there in my life).   I suppose it's halfway between Highlands and Hertfordshire....

 

Edit: use the other pronunciation of the bread-ey product and you become a West Londoner.

In other words, "could be from anywhere"

 

 

Edited by IanHx

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On 09/04/2019 at 12:38, noelh said:

Without reading any other replies so I'm not influenced. 

 

 

1. What do you call the small arthropod that lives in wet conditions, often under decaying leaves or rocks that rolls up into a little ball when startled?

 

Wood lice

 

2. What do you call the small freshwater crustacean that resembles a small lobster?

 

Crayfish

 

3. What term do you use to describe the weather phenomenon where rain falls while the sun is simultaneously shining?

 

A grand soft day. Typical Irish summer day or a sun shower. 

 

4. What do you call a public water dispensing device you can take a cool drink from?

 

A fountain 

 

5. What do you call the person who cuts your hair?

 

A hairdresser 

 

6. Does the kinship term for your mother's sister sound the same as the word ant? 

 

With my accent: ant

 

7. What do you call a knit closely fitting winter hat?

 

Bobble hat

 

8. What term do you use for shoes used in athletic activity like running or basketball?

 

Runners previously but now trainers 

 

9. What term do you use for a long narrow sandwich?

 

A roll

 

Originally from Dublin, Ireland. 

 

Also from Dublin too but some variations.

 

When we were kids we called woodlice "creepy crawlies".

I only ever went to a barbers (a rare occurrence these days)

For a while "bobble hats" were known as "Monkee Hats" as they were a popular item of attire of by the members of the 1960s pop group

 

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, IanHx said:

Uh oh. Sunderland !    (never been there in my life).   I suppose it's halfway between Highlands and Hertfordshire....

 

Edit: use the other pronunciation of the bread-ey product and you become a West Londoner.

In other words, "could be from anywhere"

 

 

Sunderland. You’re not missing much. Just imagine an enormous open-air Weatherspoons in dire need of renovation or demolition

Edited by LostCosmonauts
needed more words to encompass the horror of Sunderland

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On ‎5‎/‎16‎/‎2019 at 5:27 PM, Michou said:

This quiz reminds me of a similar quiz which the BBC had last year:
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20180205-which-british-accent-is-closest-to-your-own
I was interested in the results of this as I left England nearly 50 years ago.  Initially I used a mix of French and English and, for at least 20 years, have rarely used the latter.  The result was that I came from West London!  I wouldn't call the the area of Sutton, Cheam and Epsom in Surrey, "West London" and I sent the link to a friend in Epsom.  He is the same age and went to the same school but has remained in the same area.  His result was also West London and his reaction was that the algorithm was faulty.  I am not so certain as I have seen English accents changing: RP has long gone and that dreadful Estuary English never existed when I was there.  Has the Surrey accent changed?  Do us old farts speak differently to the current generation?

 

Mike

 

Just tried that.  Told me I was from ****** Middlesbrough!  Cheek!!

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7 minutes ago, 593jones said:

Just tried that.  Told me I was from ****** Middlesbrough!  Cheek!!

Me too. Apparently, I'm from West London and speak like Hugh Grant or Hugh Lawrie!! I can hear my old Mum laughing her head off.

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On 5/18/2019 at 3:43 AM, Eric Mc said:

For a while "bobble hats" were known as "Monkee Hats" as they were a popular item of attire of by the members of the 1960s pop group 

I'd forgotten that one. Same in the U.S.

I remember seeing some Monkees-related 'action figure'-type toys in the local Woolworths back when the show was on the air. All the band members were identified by their proper names on the packaging...except for the knit-cap-wearing Mike Nesmith, who was identified only as 'Wool Hat.' I thought that was a very odd bit of promotional licensing, even back then!

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Bullbasket said:

Me too. Apparently, I'm from West London and speak like Hugh Grant or Hugh Lawrie!! I can hear my old Mum laughing her head off.

I apparently speak like the two Hughs too - or at least would do if they were playing Worzel Gummidge!

Edited by Wez

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Apparently I'm from west London too.  Oh the shame of it.  

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Another West Londoner here, which considering I'm from Hayes, isn't too bad!

 

Could be worse, it might have said I was Brummie, a Scouse, Yorkshire or even heaven forbid, Geordie! :whistle:

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....or @Tony C, a pit yakker, sand dancer, mackem, smoggie.......:wicked:

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Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, 593jones said:

This quiz reminds me of a similar quiz which the BBC had last year:
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20180205-which-british-accent-is-closest-to-your-own

I've just tried that and it says I'm from Sunderland................. Not according to my map. Sunderland is in the deep south, mind you, I did support the football team when I was at school. It was the red and white stripes that I liked the best as all my pals wore black and white stripes for some reason. When I changed school at the age of 11, I discovered that the round ball was forbidden and the oval ball was the favoured form of sport. I never looked back from that point. 

As far as language is concerned, I have to admit that the world would be a much better place if everyone "lorned ti taak propa Ingland like ah yoosta did wen ah woz a children" . 

Edited by cngaero

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On 5/19/2019 at 6:30 PM, Seahawk said:

Apparently I'm from west London too.  Oh the shame of it.  

You think that is bad - it thinks I’m from  YORKSHIRE for goodness sake. 

🌹

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Tried it for a laugh. Says I'm from Glasgow.

 

The instant I spoke most Scots (and possibly even a lot of the English) would identify the accent as from somewhere in The Hebrides, aka The Western Isles. A fair hike from Glasgow.

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On 20/05/2019 at 01:21, cngaero said:

I discovered that the round ball was forbidden and the oval ball was the favoured form of sport. I never looked back from that point.

Well, I guess that, that depends on whether your egg chasing is the proper form (Union) or the namby pamby version (League)? :whistle:

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Let's have a little comparison of how we speak where we live. These are partly based on a linguistic study undertaken in the US, but with a few of my own additions.

 

1. What do you call the small arthropod that lives in wet conditions, often under decaying leaves or rocks that rolls up into a little ball when startled?

Wood louse

2. What do you call the small freshwater crustacean that resembles a small lobster?

Crayfish

3. What term do you use to describe the weather phenomenon where rain falls while the sun is simultaneously shining?

Shower

4. What do you call a public water dispensing device you can take a cool drink from?

Water fountain

5. What do you call the person who cuts your hair? 

Barber

6. Does the kinship term for your mother's sister sound the same as the word ant? 

No, pronounced same as can't

7. What do you call a knit closely fitting winter hat?

Benny hat (As in Benny from Crossroads, a TV soap in the '70s who used to wear such a hat)

8. What term do you use for shoes used in athletic activity like running or basketball?

Trainers

9. What term do you use for a long narrow sandwich?

Torpedo with bacon etc, sub with salad stuff

 

Settee for couch

 

Koo pon and cup ola  (as in cup of tea)

 

Raised in the Black country in England, and no I'm not a Brummie  😉

 

Ian :) 

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48 minutes ago, Tony C said:

Well, I guess that, that depends on whether your egg chasing is the proper form (Union) or the namby pamby version (League)? :whistle:

Oh, strictly Union my dear chap, the gentleman's version of the beautiful game 😄

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I just tried that BBC quiz. Apparently I'm from West London too and sound like Hugh Grant. Haha! It failed to detect my native "Sarrrrrfend" estuary accent and I'm now posh!

 

Steve

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I'm from West London too.......

Born and bred in Suffolk from Cumbrian parents.

Apparently I sound more like as Aussie, as I'm frequently asked.

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14 hours ago, brianthemodeller said:

You think that is bad - it thinks I’m from YORKSHIRE for goodness sake. 

🌹

....all I'll say is that's one heck of a compliment, we don't let anyone in, don't cha know......:whistle:

52 minutes ago, bentwaters81tfw said:

Apparently I sound more like an Aussie, as I'm frequently asked.

So that's going to be the next complaint the foreign office receives from Australia house about you Frank @bentwaters81tfw trying to pass yersen off as an Aussie :tease:

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1 hour ago, bentwaters81tfw said:

I'm from West London too.......

Born and bred in Suffolk from Cumbrian parents.

Apparently I sound more like as Aussie, as I'm frequently asked.

I can imagine that would have given you an interesting accent! 

 

It got me thinking about a great veteran that used to visit the museum I helped run. His name was Eddie Leighty and he was a waist gunner with the 447th Bomb Group at Rattlesden. He married an English girl and stayed in Rattleden for the rest of life. He had an amazing accent. One minute it was Sufffolk, next minute New York and sometimes a mix of the two. Wonderful!

 

Steve

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9 hours ago, Tony C said:

Well, I guess that, that depends on whether your egg chasing is the proper form (Union) or the namby pamby version (League)? :whistle:

Absolutely. My chemistry teacher was a northerner we called Mr Wrench (aka Dave). At the time he was a prop forward and captain of Harlequins. His comment- “don’t play league, it’s a blooody poofs game”. It’s stayed with me ever since.

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25 minutes ago, fightersweep said:

I can imagine that would have given you an interesting accent! 

 

It got me thinking about a great veteran that used to visit the museum I helped run. His name was Eddie Leighty and he was a waist gunner with the 447th Bomb Group at Rattlesden. He married an English girl and stayed in Rattleden for the rest of life. He had an amazing accent. One minute it was Sufffolk, next minute New York and sometimes a mix of the two. Wonderful!

 

Steve

I knew Eddie, he was a ball turret gunner because he was small enough to fit in there.

33 minutes ago, PhoenixII said:

 

So that's going to be the next complaint the foreign office receives from Australia house about you Frank @bentwaters81tfw trying to pass yersen off as an Aussie :tease:

FCO got enough on their plates without tracking me down for extradition. Ipswich is now officially twinned with Islamabad and Budapest.

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1 minute ago, bentwaters81tfw said:

I knew Eddie, he was a ball turret gunner because he was small enough to fit in there.

FCO got enough on their plates without tracking me down for extradition. Ipswich is now officially twinned with Islamabad and Budapest.

You know, I thought he was a ball turret gunner but it has been a very long time and I couldn't quite remember, but as you say, his stature certainly fitted the role. We always loved having Eddie visit the museum. He always made a beeline for an original "Lucky Bas*@$£s" club certificate we had on display, as he was a recipient himself and we would get the story of how he earned his. Great man!

 

Steve

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He reckoned it was real scary landing if he was still in the turret. Seeing the runway coming up and hoping the gear didn't collapse.

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8 minutes ago, bentwaters81tfw said:

He reckoned it was real scary landing if he was still in the turret. Seeing the runway coming up and hoping the gear didn't collapse.

A shame that there are so few of these guys left to talk to now. I'm so glad I got the chance when I did. I don't know if you knew him too, but there was also an ex Fw-190 pilot that lived in Suffolk and visited us a couple of times. Can't remember his name unfortunately, but he was an ex POW that never went back home and settled here. His was an interesting accent too.

 

Apologies to the op. I'm going waaaaaaay off topic!

 

Steve 

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