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SoftScience

How do you say in your English?

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12 minutes ago, Sean1968 said:

Coming from the NE of England, I find nobody understands a word I say if I travel a few miles outside the region. 

Isn't the English language, as spoken within the UK, wonderful? I remember as a raw recruit, who'd never been outside of Essex except for the annual pilgrimage to Scotland to see the family, turning up at Catterick Camp before the dawn of history in '64, and being totally bewildered. There were Scots, Welsh, Irish, Brummies, Scousers, in fact, just about every part of the UK was represented. A couple of lads from Yorkshire sounded to me as though they'd just stepped out of the Bible with their "thee's" and "thou's". But the ones that I had no chance of understanding or communicating with, were some of the Geordies. Some were so heavily accented, especially one lad. He was a stocky bloke who some idiot thought would make a comcen op, which entailed typing on teleprinters. If you'd seen how thick his fingers were, you'd understand why that was so laughable. We'd been there for a couple of weeks and there was a chance to get a 36 hour pass. So Geordie comes up to me and asks "Ista gannin yam termorra?" At the time, I had not the slightest idea what he had said. But I soon learned. It just goes to show how rich our language is.

 

John (Sarfend).

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1 hour ago, Bullbasket said:

Isn't the English language, as spoken within the UK, wonderful? I remember as a raw recruit, who'd never been outside of Essex except for the annual pilgrimage to Scotland to see the family, turning up at Catterick Camp before the dawn of history in '64, and being totally bewildered. There were Scots, Welsh, Irish, Brummies, Scousers, in fact, just about every part of the UK was represented. A couple of lads from Yorkshire sounded to me as though they'd just stepped out of the Bible with their "thee's" and "thou's". But the ones that I had no chance of understanding or communicating with, were some of the Geordies. Some were so heavily accented, especially one lad. He was a stocky bloke who some idiot thought would make a comcen op, which entailed typing on teleprinters. If you'd seen how thick his fingers were, you'd understand why that was so laughable. We'd been there for a couple of weeks and there was a chance to get a 36 hour pass. So Geordie comes up to me and asks "Ista gannin yam termorra?" At the time, I had not the slightest idea what he had said. But I soon learned. It just goes to show how rich our language is.

 

John (Sarfend).

Yes it is rich and wouldn’t have it any other way. I am happy to see over the last few decades regional dialect/accents have become common place. Let’s be honest, how many of us actually speak the Queen’s English. 

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2 hours ago, Bullbasket said:

turning up at Catterick Camp before the dawn of history in '64, and being totally bewildered. There were Scots, Welsh, Irish, Brummies, Scousers, in fact, just about every part of the UK was represented.

 

I had the same experience when I joined the RAF, turning up from the south coast with my Farmer's accent at RAF Swinderby to be met by to quote Elvis Costello's Oliver's Army "the boys from the Mersey and the Thames and the Tyne" as well as all other points of the compass was a bit of an eye-opener.  You had to acquire your own "Jockney Translator" very quickly.

 

It's stood me in good stead though, it doesn't take me long to tune into an accent, the other thing is my vocabulary also contains slang words from all over which has rubbed off on the kids, they claim it's how other ex-Scaley Brats recognise other!

 

1 hour ago, Sean1968 said:

Yes it is rich and wouldn’t have it any other way. I am happy to see over the last few decades regional dialect/accents have become common place. Let’s be honest, how many of us actually speak the Queen’s English. 

 

I really like the fact that continuity announcements on the TV and radio are made by people with strong regional accents these days, seems more friendly!

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Great thread! I'll leave out the boring answers... 

 

1. What do you call the small arthropod that lives in wet conditions, often under decaying leaves or rocks that rolls up into a little ball when startled?

Woodlouse. Or Granny Granfer if you're under five.
 
3. What term do you use to describe the weather phenomenon where rain falls while the sun is simultaneously shining?

Er, what's sun?
 
4. What do you call a public water dispensing device you can take a cool drink from?

Water fountain. Stream (if pushed).
 
5. What do you call the person who cuts your hair?

Gorgeous! Julie actually. She's still taking my money even though I now only have / need a 'run over' with a number 4 shaver and a quick polish on the top. Worth every penny. Great girl.
 

8. What term do you use for shoes used in athletic activity like running or basketball?

Dap or pumps. As in 'Mr Maddox gave me the dap when I was bad in class'. A bizarre form of punishment but less 'serious' than 'the cane'. 
 
What do you call the long piece of 'front room' furniture you can sit or lay on?

Sofa. Or 'Chaise' if it's one of those posh ones you can only really lie on.

 

I'm from the West Country (Bath, England) where we're known to roll our Rs, especially interesting when it's the 'ladies' :D 

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On 4/9/2019 at 3:15 AM, SoftScience said:

 

 

1. What do you call the small arthropod that lives in wet conditions, often under decaying leaves or rocks that rolls up into a little ball when startled? We called them bagogo's as kids (g's pronounced like the Scots pronounce Loch)

 

2. What do you call the small freshwater crustacean that resembles a small lobster? Not entirely sure.

 

3. What term do you use to describe the weather phenomenon where rain falls while the sun is simultaneously shining? Monkey's wedding

 

4. What do you call a public water dispensing device you can take a cool drink from? Tap

 

5. What do you call the person who cuts your hair? Barber for men, hairdresser for women

 

6. Does the kinship term for your mother's sister sound the same as the word ant? Pronounced 'Ont'

 

7. What do you call a knit closely fitting winter hat? Beanie

 

8. What term do you use for shoes used in athletic activity like running or basketball? Tackies

 

9. What term do you use for a long narrow sandwich? Roll. If you want a larger one filled with just about everything in the fridge and some slap chips (hot chips) then it's called a Gatsby (which can feed a family of four!)

 

 

 

In your response please state what region of your country you're from.

 

I'm originally South African.

 

There are other South Africanisms that I brought over to the UK that I've had to abandon due to the frequency of blank stairs I received. A traffic light is a 'robot' in SA and a roundabout is simply called a 'circle'.

 

There are also three versions of the word 'now'. They are: 'now' , 'now-now' and 'just now' , for each one you should add an increasing period of time to your expections of when the action will take place. 'Now' means within a few minutes, 'now-now' means anything up to 30 minutes or so and 'just now' could be an hour, could be a few hours. To mconfuse you even more, they're interchangeable, depending on who you speak to.

 

If you've read all that, you'll now know what it means if a South African tells you to 'meet me now-now at the robot by the circle'. No thanks necessary!

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Posted (edited)

I bet you don't invite anyone around for a Braai either now or just now. 😊

Edited by noelh

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4 hours ago, noelh said:

I bet you don't invite anyone around for a Braai either now or just now. 😊

Actually, a braai usually goes on for hours and hours (weather works with is over there) , so if you drop in now, now-now, or just now, it probably won't make a difference! 

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On 4/9/2019 at 10:36 PM, noelh said:

I'm a southsider. Anyway I thought Northsiders used a bowl. Shave everything below the bowl. :wicked:

That's the cut you get in the 'Joy. Price we pay for being able to loot the leafy suburbs of South Dublin !!

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38 minutes ago, glatisant said:

That's the cut you get in the 'Joy. Price we pay for being able to loot the leafy suburbs of South Dublin !!

Well yes, we all know what a Northsider in a suit is called: The Defendant! And the difference between a Northsider and Batman? Batman can go shopping without Robin. 

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23 hours ago, noelh said:

Well yes, we all know what a Northsider in a suit is called: The Defendant! And the difference between a Northsider and Batman? Batman can go shopping without Robin. 

We don't need to go shopping, we just steal yours ,take your car as well, rally it for a few hours and then burn  it out. !!!!

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On 4/14/2019 at 11:46 AM, glatisant said:

We don't need to go shopping, we just steal yours ,take your car as well, rally it for a few hours and then burn  it out. !!!!

Don't I know it! My motorbike was stolen twice. Both times it ended up in the North side. The second time it was used as a getaway bike in an armed robbery on a pub on the south side and then dumped in Finglas. 

 

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1. Woodlouse.

2. Crayfish.

3. We don't see the sun often enough to have a special word for it

4. Water fountain.

5. Gillian (Mrs BtM)

6. Aunt or Auntie. (but pronounced ant or anty)

7. Woolly hat.

8. Trainers.

9. Baguette.

 

And settee.

 

Brian

Costa del Blackpool

Lancashire

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8 hours ago, noelh said:

Don't I know it! My motorbike was stolen twice. Both times it ended up in the North side. The second time it was used as a getaway bike in an armed robbery on a pub on the south side and then dumped in Finglas. 

 

Yeh,thanks for the bike. !!!!!

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Posted (edited)
On 4/8/2019 at 9:15 PM, SoftScience said:

Let's have a little comparison of how we speak where we live. Thase are partly based on a linguistic study undertaken in the US, but with a few of my own additions.

 

1. What do you call the small arthropod that lives in wet conditions, often under decaying leaves or rocks that rolls up into a little ball when startled?

 

2. What do you call the small freshwater crustacean that resembles a small lobster?

 

3. What term do you use to describe the weather phenomenon where rain falls while the sun is simultaneously shining?

 

4. What do you call a public water dispensing device you can take a cool drink from?

 

5. What do you call the person who cuts your hair?

 

6. Does the kinship term for your mother's sister sound the same as the word ant? 

 

7. What do you call a knit closely fitting winter hat?

 

8. What term do you use for shoes used in athletic activity like running or basketball?

 

9. What term do you use for a long narrow sandwich?

 

 

 

In your response please state what region of your country you're from.

1) potato bug, 2)crawdad, 3)refreshing, 4)Fountain, 5)SWMBO (hairstylist), 6)aunt(ant), 7)stocking cap, 8)Gym, 9)Sub sandwhich. 

 

I am currently from the suburbs of Chicago Illinois. I was raised mostly in the western suburbs, northern Wisconsin Farm country, & South Side of Chicago. 

 

Dennis

Edited by Corsairfoxfouruncle

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This quiz reminds me of a similar quiz which the BBC had last year:
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20180205-which-british-accent-is-closest-to-your-own
I was interested in the results of this as I left England nearly 50 years ago.  Initially I used a mix of French and English and, for at least 20 years, have rarely used the latter.  The result was that I came from West London!  I wouldn't call the the area of Sutton, Cheam and Epsom in Surrey, "West London" and I sent the link to a friend in Epsom.  He is the same age and went to the same school but has remained in the same area.  His result was also West London and his reaction was that the algorithm was faulty.  I am not so certain as I have seen English accents changing: RP has long gone and that dreadful Estuary English never existed when I was there.  Has the Surrey accent changed?  Do us old farts speak differently to the current generation?

 

Mike

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Apparently I'm from West London too, and I've lived all my life in Northampton. I think the test gradings are ill-defined.

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21 minutes ago, Michou said:

This quiz reminds me of a similar quiz which the BBC had last year:
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20180205-which-british-accent-is-closest-to-your-own

So I figured i would take the test as I'm the curious sort. Now im American born & bred. However I know my ancestry is from the East Midlands in the U.K.. I did quite an extensive bit of research 5 years ago. My results of the test East Midlands. 

kSPmybP.png

Truly an odd coincidence ? 

 

Dennis

 

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2 hours ago, Michou said:

This quiz reminds me of a similar quiz which the BBC had last year:
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20180205-which-british-accent-is-closest-to-your-own
I was interested in the results of this as I left England nearly 50 years ago.  Initially I used a mix of French and English and, for at least 20 years, have rarely used the latter.  The result was that I came from West London!  I wouldn't call the the area of Sutton, Cheam and Epsom in Surrey, "West London" and I sent the link to a friend in Epsom.  He is the same age and went to the same school but has remained in the same area.  His result was also West London and his reaction was that the algorithm was faulty.  I am not so certain as I have seen English accents changing: RP has long gone and that dreadful Estuary English never existed when I was there.  Has the Surrey accent changed?  Do us old farts speak differently to the current generation?

 

Mike

Apparently my East Coast Canadian tempered with my Western Canadian ( where I've lived for 39 of my 64 years ) is most matching the East Midlands accent.

 

 

Chris

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3 hours ago, Corsairfoxfouruncle said:

So I figured i would take the test as I'm the curious sort. Now im American born & bred. However I know my ancestry is from the East Midlands in the U.K.. I did quite an extensive bit of research 5 years ago. My results of the test East Midlands. 

 

Truly an odd coincidence ? 

 

Dennis

 

1 hour ago, dogsbody said:

Apparently my East Coast Canadian tempered with my Western Canadian ( where I've lived for 39 of my 64 years ) is most matching the East Midlands accent.

 

Chris

Can't be all bad, the East Midlands covers - Lincolnshire, originally, quite a strong accent. Nottinghamshire, traditionally a mining county, strong accent. Leicestershire, supposed to be the most accent neutral country in the Country, more sheep and cattle than pits! Part of Derbyshire, again mining, very strong accent  and a small part of Staffordshire, accent can be quite strong in places, containing places as diverse as 'Brewtropolis' (Burton upon Trent) in the East of the county and the 'Black Country', Wolverhampton, Walsall, Pelsall and more, being the cradle of the industrial revolution also the 'Potteries', which includes Stoke-on-Trent, Hanley, Longton and Barlaston the home of Wedgwood, in the West. 

 

Paul,

Leicestershire by birth, Staffordshire by raising........

North Yorkshire by choice.

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Some funny things on here... great subject though.

 

1. What do you call the small arthropod that lives in wet conditions, often under decaying leaves or rocks that rolls up into a little ball when startled?

 

Carpet tank

 

2. What do you call the small freshwater crustacean that resembles a small lobster?

 

Langoustine

 

3. What term do you use to describe the weather phenomenon where rain falls while the sun is simultaneously shining?

 

No idea … But usually it's only 2 seconds away from somebody rubber necking for a Rainbow .

 

4. What do you call a public water dispensing device you can take a cool drink from?

 

drinking fountain 

 

5. What do you call the person who cuts your hair?

 

A Barber

 

6. Does the kinship term for your mother's sister sound the same as the word ant? 

 

No

 

7. What do you call a knit closely fitting winter hat?

 

Benny/ woolly hat

 

8. What term do you use for shoes used in athletic activity like running or basketball?

 

Trainers 

 

9. What term do you use for a long narrow sandwich?

 

Baguette

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5 hours ago, Ratch said:

Apparently I'm from West London too, and I've lived all my life in Northampton. I think the test gradings are ill-defined.

Today I changed one or two answers and I'm from Suffolk. I bet they don't know how to pronounce Cogenhoe :smartass:

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30 minutes ago, Ratch said:

Today I changed one or two answers and I'm from Suffolk. I bet they don't know how to pronounce Cogenhoe :smartass:

Ah but can you pronounce Aldeburgh?

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9 hours ago, bentwaters81tfw said:

Ah but can you pronounce Aldeburgh?

......or even Happisburgh!!

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And if you’re a local how do you pronounce Cirencester? Sissister?

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15 hours ago, Michou said:

Do us old farts speak differently to the current generation?

 

Short answer....yes! I grew up in Southend-on-Sea, with a Scottish father and Cockney (Bethnal Green) mother. Both of my siblings are from Hackney, but my Mum always said that I sounded more Cockney than the Cockneys. But that's not to say that my speech was/is bad, as I've never changed "th" into "f". In fact, when I heard my voice on a tape recorder, it sounded like Max Bygraves. When I was a kid, my friends spoke the same as me, and there was no such thing as "estuary speak". That is something which has come about over the last 20-30 years and hasn't been helped by so called reality shows such as TOWIE and Made in Chelsea and other such pieces of :poop:. I think a lot of the way that the language is spoken now in the SE comes from kids in S. London, trying to talk as though they were some Jamaican drug baron. Also, TV has got a lot to answer for. My heart sank just a teeny bit when I spoke to my Grandson on his 7th birthday on the phone, and I asked him how he was, to which he replied, "I'm good". Oh well. I still love him to bits.

 

John.

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