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Here another build from 2010, nine years ago, with the same basic but not unfair take:

 

Since I was at it with the Macchi M.C.72, I decided to also go for the M.67, which was a slightly earlier -1929- machine equipped with an Isotta Fraschini ASSO 18cyl in “W” of 1,800 hp. The particular configuration of the engine determined the shape of the front fuselage. Three machines were made and experienced the multiple problems associated which such complex pieces of engineering.

Like the M.C.72, the M.67 was a pure bred racer seaplane, conceived to compete for the Schneider trophy. The lines and general arrangement are similar to those of the MC72, also having radiators on the wings, floats and struts, besides the fuselage sides and the oil cooler under the chin. It had a three-blade propeller that of course created some torque, so one float carried more fuel than the other and the wing was very slightly asymmetrical to try to compensate. The design was not fortunate due to technical problems, but one machine survives at the Vigna Di Valle museum.

How to paint an Italian racer:

You must know that the secret is in the tomatoes. The right ones will give the finished model that characteristic bright red racy hue.

But seriously:

The model followed the same methods as the similar MC72 posted here, one difference being the shapes created for the engine cylinder bank fairings. As it is sometimes the case, the carving and sanding of these particular parts and their fit over a compound-curve surface required some attention and time. Aeroclub vac floats were adapted removing a section and re-joining their front and back halves which matched the plans very well. A cockpit interior was created of which little could be seen once the fuselage halves were closed. The fuselage needed several sessions of puttying, sanding and priming. The fuselage side radiators were engraved on thin alu foil that was painted brass later on and added to the finished fuselage. Struts for the floats were adapted from Contrail streamlined stock. A leftover bomb from a kit was put to better use creating the conical spinner, and blades were re-shaped from a white metal prop. Spars were located on the fuselage to align and secure tail and wing halves. Decals, 77 of them, were home made

The fantastic lines of this racer look like a sculpture influenced by artist Carra, Balla and Boccioni of Italian Futurism fame.

 

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Another masterpiece, Claudio! That huge 'broad-arrow' engine really gives this aircraft a distinctive look. I love those '20's and '30's racers!

 

Best Regards,

 

Jason

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35 minutes ago, Learstang said:

Another masterpiece, Claudio! That huge 'broad-arrow' engine really gives this aircraft a distinctive look. I love those '20's and '30's racers!

 

Best Regards,

 

Jason

Thanks, Jason

The racers of that period are indeed of a superlative beauty.

Cheers

 

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Fantastic indeed - spectacularly so!! I’m so glad your expansive civil stable includes these thoroughbreds! And scratchbuilt too - so inspiring! :pilot:

 

I can confess to having spent far too much time admiring the lines of this machine, but it is this otherwise pointless expertise which gives me great confidence in declaring your craftsmanship astonishingly accurate!

 

So inspirational, congratulations

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9 hours ago, Courageous said:

:Tasty: Another stunner, love what you've done here. Beautiful.

Is the wing one length of solid plastic, if so, how did you get the chord-wise curve?

 

Stuart

It's folded over plastic sheet, Stuart.

I hardly ever use carved solid plastic, I find it brutal 😉

Cheers

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Wow those Schneider racers really were awsome looking things - with all of that engine in the front it is no wonder that it flew like a bat out of hell! A superb piece of scratch building and very striking colour scheme.

 

P

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13 minutes ago, pheonix said:

Wow those Schneider racers really were awsome looking things - with all of that engine in the front it is no wonder that it flew like a bat out of hell! A superb piece of scratch building and very striking colour scheme.

 

P

The virtues here are all of the originals.

Their lines are indeed superb.

Cheers

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One of my favourite aeronautical themes - the Schneider cup aircraft are a wonderful set of ground-breaking (or should that be water-breaking) aeroplanes. The Italian ones in particular are just gorgeous - I was almost in tears when I was able to stroke the four of them in the museum at Vigna di Valle, and i have been able to touch the S6B in the Science Museum in London and S5 replica in Southhampton. I have kits of many of them but your scratch-building effort is wonderful.

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1 hour ago, Horatio Gruntfuttock said:

One of my favourite aeronautical themes - the Schneider cup aircraft are a wonderful set of ground-breaking (or should that be water-breaking) aeroplanes. The Italian ones in particular are just gorgeous - I was almost in tears when I was able to stroke the four of them in the museum at Vigna di Valle, and i have been able to touch the S6B in the Science Museum in London and S5 replica in Southhampton. I have kits of many of them but your scratch-building effort is wonderful.

Horatio, is this a public confession to plane molesting?

Is that even a crime?

It's weird in any case.

And if it is a crime, is a crime of passion.

 

 

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A small hiatus while we visit Palms Desert (and I sneak to a well known hobby shop in the area):

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OOOH ooh! That really does look the business. The Schneider cup racers from the 20/30s were incredibly beautiful beasts. The combination of the monster engine and prop with the tiny, shapely fuselage and the floats strung underneath just make these types aesthetically top notch! This type may not have been very successful but would have been up there near the top in the concours d'elegance.

 

Superb model by the way Moa.

 

Cheers

 

Malcolm

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6 hours ago, Baldy said:

OOOH ooh! That really does look the business. The Schneider cup racers from the 20/30s were incredibly beautiful beasts. The combination of the monster engine and prop with the tiny, shapely fuselage and the floats strung underneath just make these types aesthetically top notch! This type may not have been very successful but would have been up there near the top in the concours d'elegance.

 

Superb model by the way Moa.

 

Cheers

 

Malcolm

Absolutely agree with your words, Malcolm 

cheers

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20 hours ago, djos said:

Fantastic work, and beautiful plane.

BRAVO!

Best regards Djordje

Thanks Djordje!

Cheers

 

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  • 1 year later...
14 hours ago, Andriy Butko said:

Ggreat work!!!

Very kind of you, Andriy!

13 hours ago, Ventsislav Gramatski said:

Great model of a beautiful plane! The fact that this is a scratchbuild makes it all the better. Always found it absolutely inspiring to be able to make one. 

Very kind, thanks.

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13 hours ago, Terry1954 said:

Just found this one Moa. Another stunning little model!

 

Terry

Thanks, Terry. A relatively old one, but still sort of ok.

Cheers

 

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