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These are all old builds, and in retrospect should have been posted at the beginning of these series. They often represent the first, hesitant steps on scratchbuilding.

Here is another from 2007, 12 years ago (original text as posted then:

 

In 1933 took to the air an experimental plane that reputedly contributed to raise French fashion design to even higher standards.
The plane made use of an adapted Farman series 400 fuselage to which a semi-circular wing of large area was attached. One can only image the discussion between the control surfaces about which will have to control what.

Nevertheless the plane flew, and flew well, in-spite of the pilot reputedly having to deal with an abundance of levers protruding from every conceivable corner of the cockpit.
The model:
For those of us with a bias toward the unusual, this is one that ranks high in the list; simple enough to avoid much head-scratching and good looking enough to spark the construction flame.

Haute -flying- couture!

Farman+x+001+%25281280x960%2529.jpg

 

Farnan+1020+e+002+%25281280x960%2529.jpg

 

Farman+002+%25281280x960%2529.jpg

 

Farman+x+002+%25281280x960%2529.jpg

 

Farman+x+003+%25281280x937%2529.jpg

 

Farman+x+007-1+%25281024x768%2529.jpg

 

Farman+x+013+%25281024x768%2529.jpg

 

 

 

 

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It looks like the grandfather of the Vought XF5U Flying Flapjack! Another unusual beauty from your archives!

 

Regards,

 

Jason

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Just brilliant. I never get tired of seeing these exotic scratchbuilds and learning about the original machines.

 

Also, thanks for being so inspirational: I have a Luton Minor on the go, as my first attempt at scratchbuilding in 1/72, which is the direct result of my enjoyment of your civilian lightplane subjects, and I think your 'in-progress' photos are just as interesting as those of the finished items.

 

Jon

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I look at at all your builds but cannot comment on them all. 

They remind me of various species of Moths. They are so many. We humans were nearly as prolific as nature in the early days of aviation. 

How much more are there? 

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Without wishing to be disrespectful, it shows a little that this was one of your earliest attempts. Having written that I would have been proud to have made it!! That really does look like a fuselage trying to carry a wing a la Atlas holding up the sky!

 

Simply marvellous and as usual the construction photo is extremely interesting and helpful to those of us looking for inspiration.

 

P

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1 hour ago, Jonners said:

Just brilliant. I never get tired of seeing these exotic scratchbuilds and learning about the original machines.

 

Also, thanks for being so inspirational: I have a Luton Minor on the go, as my first attempt at scratchbuilding in 1/72, which is the direct result of my enjoyment of your civilian lightplane subjects, and I think your 'in-progress' photos are just as interesting as those of the finished items.

 

Jon

Jon, looking forward to see that one!

Cheers

39 minutes ago, noelh said:

I look at at all your builds but cannot comment on them all. 

They remind me of various species of Moths. They are so many. We humans were nearly as prolific as nature in the early days of aviation. 

How much more are there? 

Many, many, many....

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9 minutes ago, pheonix said:

Without wishing to be disrespectful, it shows a little that this was one of your earliest attempts. Having written that I would have been proud to have made it!! That really does look like a fuselage trying to carry a wing a la Atlas holding up the sky!

 

Simply marvellous and as usual the construction photo is extremely interesting and helpful to those of us looking for inspiration.

 

P

You are right, and that's exactly why I show them: no first attempts are perfect (not mine, for sure, far from it), but we learn and improve, and that has no end.

So nobody should be discouraged by models that don't come up as we dream them or want them, if we keep going, things steadily improve.

Cheers

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