Jump to content

When 3 Become 1 - Converting an Italeri Ju52/3m to a Ju52/1m *** COMPLETED ***


Recommended Posts

Lovely subject. Much more interesting than a regular JU52.  

 

On the decal front I've had very good results printing my own with This  it's a laser printable clear film. 

47462507511_0dab79fdcf_z.jpg

I've used it for the zig zag lines and the gauntlet on the tail. You do need access to a colour laser printer but it  was pretty easy to use and while thin on application pretty easy to use.

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/20/2019 at 6:50 PM, Tweener said:

I myself was always curious as to why a twin engine configuration wasn't tried before 3 engines were decided on. In any case, I too am working on a 52 under a different name - C-79. Right now it's backlogged while I search for an RLM 02 that can actually be brushed.

 

My guess is that the nose was already set up for an engine, so why not?  Three was also pretty "standard" (or common) in those days, so maybe not as peculiar as we now perceive it.

 

A bold conversion, for sure!  It'll be fun to follow along, and I think I'm safe from trying it in 1/48 😉  I might have to dig my Ju out and have a gander at the sprues, though- not with the idea of converting, just admiring.

 

bob

 

p.s. My dream is to do one of the purple "Milka" ones, and I've got the same decal problem.  I just love the thought of plopping that down on a contest table!

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow this is a first for me... two pages into a thread and I haven't even started yet! No pressure then...

 

Thanks to @rob Lyttle , @Orso (again!), @fightersweep , @Moa , @Marklo and @gingerbob for your contributions, very much appreciated!

 

I note with interest that Hannants have the 'Milka' decals in stock at the moment, albeit in 1:72. Why they are classified as 'Military' is something of a mystery to me, unless this was the Fuhrer's secret weapon - inflicting massive amounts of Swiss chocolate on his enemies in the hope that they would all keel over with obesity !

 

I will start soon, I promise!

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, clive_t said:

inflicting massive amounts of Swiss chocolate on his enemies in the hope that they would all keel over with obesity !

Oh, but remember that famous mint chocolate: "It's only a tiny little thin one", after which Mr. Creosote explodes!

Run for cover!

Cheers

 

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I want to build one of these to eventually. I've snuck inside 'ARM when I volunteered at the museum. The cockpit is quite bare. I don't know if they were going to backdate it or what. It's got some green inside and whatever new parts were put on, as in the side openings on the fuselage are bare aluminum on the inside. This replica has no roof hatch, I have seen a drawing of it with the roof panel off. It was someplace over the wing. From what I heard from the people who where around at the time of the conversion, they couldn't get the plane certified for flight after the conversion. Don't know why. I did hear a story that when the props were carved someplace out west, the guys in the p/up stayed overnight in a town for sleep and payed some drunk guy to make sure no one stole the props. People like wooden props for decoration and finding a set in a truck overnight is always the best price. The float on display with ARM is the actual float from the original. The museum is closed currently. They had high hopes of a new building being built and for some reason are short on money even with a lot of corporate backing. The collection is scattered around, don't know where ARM is exactly.

  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

OK I guess technically I am planting my spade in the ground here having cut a fuselage half off its sprue, but I am not massively confident...

 

This evening I took one of the diagrams of the aircraft, and scaled it to 1:72 of its official length (18.5m) - and tried to overlay the fuselage half on top of it to see how close a fit it was.

 

Answer: not very!

 

lyt3hSV.jpg

 

I think my modeller's licence is up for renewal. Still, never mind eh!

 

Tally Ho, Yellow!

 

  • Sad 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

It's an easy build.

Cut off the engines in the wings. Fill the holes and replace the missing corrugation.

Move the cargo door to the left side and the rear door to the right.

Remove the window panels and make new corrugated ones with hatches in them.

Add the cargo hatch in the roof.

Build a new fin.

Add corrugation all the way down to the wings on the fuselage.

Build a new nose and add new propellers.

Build a new canopy.

 

Not much to it really 🙂

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Orso said:

It's an easy build.

Cut off the engines in the wings. Fill the holes and replace the missing corrugation.

Move the cargo door to the left side and the rear door to the right.

Remove the window panels and make new corrugated ones with hatches in them.

Add the cargo hatch in the roof.

Build a new fin.

Add corrugation all the way down to the wings on the fuselage.

Build a new nose and add new propellers.

Build a new canopy.

 

Not much to it really 🙂

You also need to swing the wings forward. When the 52 was enlarged and the wing engines were added the wings were swept back a few degrees to regain the CoG.

If you look you'll notice that the wing engines angle outwards because of this.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The Fuselage doesn't look too bad. A new fin and some nose surgery. The corrugations are what would make me extremely nervous, which is why I have a Junkers D1 sitting in my stash for so long even though I love the type and why my Junkers J1 has never gotten off the ground ( so to speak)

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Black Knight said:

You also need to swing the wings forward. When the 52 was enlarged and the wing engines were added the wings were swept back a few degrees to regain the CoG.

If you look you'll notice that the wing engines angle outwards because of this.

The drawing in the magazine Junkers-Nachrichten No 3 1931 matches he angles on the Italeri kit

Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't think there was a change in sweepback (that WAS done on the single-engined W34). The inclined outboard engines were to reduce the asymmetric thrust condition in case of an outboard engine failure and to give greater rudder control as still in the propwash.

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Roger Holden said:

Don't think there was a change in sweepback (that WAS done on the single-engined W34). The inclined outboard engines were to reduce the asymmetric thrust condition in case of an outboard engine failure and to give greater rudder control as still in the propwash.

 

That's why the outer engines were pointing out? Always wondered that. I just know that with ARM, both pilots had to stand on the rudder during take off to counter the torque.  During winter, one would also be scrapping the others windshield of ice on take offs.

Link to post
Share on other sites

ABA of Sweden didn't like this and ordered planes with the engines mounted  straight. I've read that when ABA were down at Junkers discussing this people from South African were there and ordered planes with that configuration as well.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all, thanks again for your interest and inputs they are all much appreciated. No chance of looking at this yesterday, and only a brief window for me now until Monday - but I did the same thing with the wing to see how it compared. Answer: very nicely thank you!

 

QVxBJCK.jpg

 

I'll take that!

 

Edited to add: With apologies and acknowledgements to the originator of the drawing, Mr Helmut Ott :)

 

Edited by clive_t
acknowledgement of drawing originator
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a simple trick to do corrugated surfaces,  Cover some area of model with silicon (for example part of wing nearby the pleace when you will cut out side engine fairing) then after few days you cen remove silicon form and apply there a thin (1 mm or less) of epoxy glue. After fixing of glue you have a copy of surface, which you can easily cut out and glue in place of removed engine. I made using this technique modification of W 34 to lower fuselage K43 with windows in other positions and modified G24 from Revell  to G24he - with new corrugated fin

 

36268827281_64ae8e6ca6_b.jpg&key=f1f5c12

35597764953_2abd524905_b.jpg&key=2a235d0

 

The adventage of the method is that you have exactly the same kind of surface as on rest of model

Regards

J-W

 

  • Like 6
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, JWM said:

I have a simple trick to do corrugated surfaces,  Cover some area of model with silicon (for example part of wing nearby the pleace when you will cut out side engine fairing) then after few days you cen remove silicon form and apply there a thin (1 mm or less) of epoxy glue. After fixing of glue you have a copy of surface, which you can easily cut out and glue in place of removed engine.

Thanks J-W, I will give that idea some further thought! :thumbsup2:

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought I'd have a go at this foiling lark this evening...

 

I chose a small piece that had corrugations on it - the starboard elevator:

 

VRDti04.jpg

 

I cut off a short length of aluminium tape, and having carefully removed the backing sheet, wrapped it entirely around the piece. I have no idea at this stage if this is the correct way of doing it, but after some minutes of rubbing a blending stump along the corrugations I started to see the definition coming through. I then went over those corrugations across half the width of the piece with a blunted cocktail stick. Hopefully you can see the difference here:

 

MbrO57l.jpg

 

Aside from the practicalities of cutting the foil to shape, which I have yet to try, I am quietly pleased with how that looks!

 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, JWM said:

I have a simple trick to do corrugated surfaces,  Cover some area of model with silicon (for example part of wing nearby the pleace when you will cut out side engine fairing) then after few days you cen remove silicon form and apply there a thin (1 mm or less) of epoxy glue. After fixing of glue you have a copy of surface, which you can easily cut out and glue in place of removed engine. I made using this technique modification of W 34 to lower fuselage K43 with windows in other positions and modified G24 from Revell  to G24he - with new corrugated fin

 

36268827281_64ae8e6ca6_b.jpg&key=f1f5c12

35597764953_2abd524905_b.jpg&key=2a235d0

 

The adventage of the method is that you have exactly the same kind of surface as on rest of model

Regards

J-W

 

What kind of silicone? the paintable bathtub type? I guess you'd have to wash the area real good after.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, JWM said:

 

36268827281_64ae8e6ca6_b.jpg&key=f1f5c12

 

Is this a Greek or Argentinian plane? The cocades are virtually indistinguishable from each other.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

If it eats empanadas and drinks yerba mate like me, then it is Argentinian 

  • Haha 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Moa said:

If it eats empanadas and drinks yerba mate like me, then it is Argentinian 

And plays Truco.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • clive_t changed the title to When 3 Become 1 - Converting an Italeri Ju52/3m to a Ju52/1m *** COMPLETED ***

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...