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BlobMan

Autism

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This feels like something that could get me in a lot of trouble, but just know I don't intend to offend anyone. Sorry If I have. :sorry: 

 

I'm not autistic myself, I was just wondering if any of you are. I wonder if scale modeling is one of things that stereotypical autistic people do, like draw pictures of trains. To be honest, I wouldn't be surprised if I was some degree of autistic. 

 

Discuss.

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As I believe was said on the James May Hornby 'documentary' this week "We are all on the spectrum somewhere"!

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Think what often gets confused is autistic traits and autism the 'mental disorder', the disorder quite different, true there probably are people with it so mild that they appear normal or be unaware they are on the spectrum that lends to the argument about everyone being on the spectrum, but no most people are not on the spectrum.

 

However everyone is on the "spectrum" when it comes to traits, and given those associate with modelling are also those with autism, you would expect an awful lot of people in our community would cluster around those traits as well there being a higher than average rate of actual diagnosable autists, of which I am one (don't think I've said this on here before)

 

 

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I have worked with SEN children for many years. Children on  the spectrum can be very focused and obsessive to varying degrees.  I knew one who used to bring in the most wonderfully painted Warhammer figures, and could reel off all the stats and bonuses of the various figures. Another who rarely spoke to anyone became my "best friend" when he overhear me discussing Marvel movies with another student and realised we had a shared interest.

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Only if 'being on the spectrum' means preferring to spend time alone gluing bits of plastic together instead of talking with other people.  Rivet-counting on the other hand would seem to be a sure sign of OCD   :)

 

I do wonder if the alleged rise in autism in the last decade  is really a reflection of an increasingly connected society that can't  comprehend anyone who doesn't wish to spend all their time yakking while glued to twitfacetube, and applying a convenient label....

 

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I'm not sure if Autism is really on the rise or if it is just becoming more obvious these days. It's also a misconception that autism sufferers are not involved in Social Media and shy away from human contact. I personally think that Social Media is a boon to those on the spectrum as it is communication without having to deal with sloppy human qualities like facial expressions and tone of voice. My stepson, his siblings and his father who are all on the spectrum are on their phones (non-verbal social media) almost constantly where I only pull my phone out to call someone or take a picture once in a blue moon. I'm not even close to suffering from Autism Spectrum Disorder I'm just very anti-social and don't really find getting involved with the human race in general to be very rewarding for the amount of effort it requires. It may stem from the fact that, as many people will attest, I am from another planet. 😁

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6 minutes ago, Beardie said:

It may stem from the fact that, as many people will attest, I am from another planet. 😁

When you've settled in on our planet Beardie one word of warning,most people are backstabbing morons.....

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Oh I picked up on that in my early days on Earth Vince, another reason why I try to avoid people wherever possible unless I have had them thoroughly vetted and even then they are kept at arms length. It's kind of funny for me. People on the spectrum find the world hard to cope with because it and the people who inhabit it are too unpredictable for them and I find the world hard to cope with because the Earth and it's people are too predictable and bore me. I like surprises but I am still waiting for one to happen.  

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My wife says I have OCD. No, wait! She says I'm anal retentive. No, that's not it. She said I'm a rectal orifice! ( I can't use the actual words she called me because those words are verboten here ).

 

But, yes, I'm with Beardie. The general population are more than annoying. That's why I'm enjoying my retirement so much. I don't have to go out among them too often nor for very long.

 

 

Chris

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8 hours ago, PhantomBigStu said:

but no most people are not on the spectrum.

Hmm, I always interpreted that phrase as everyone is on the spectrum but most people are at the not autistic end of the spectrum.

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The intent of the phrase ‘on the spectrum’ is to infer an individual or group has behavioural traits that indicate a leaning towards Autisim.

On the James May programme it was used lightheartedly to try and provide context to why we do what we do. 

The programme was in a way a celebration of mild eccentricity which is a culturally beloved trait in the UK and a hallmark of James May’s personal brand. 

 

As PBS says the hobby of plastic model building and it’s associated sub genres can foster behaviours that could be associated with autisim.

But that doesn’t mean that everyone who partakes in the hobby is on the Autistic Spectrum.  Some folk will be some folk won’t. 

 

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58 minutes ago, Plasto said:

The intent of the phrase ‘on the spectrum’ is to infer an individual or group has behavioural traits that indicate a leaning towards Autisim.

On the James May programme it was used lightheartedly to try and provide context to why we do what we do. 

The programme was in a way a celebration of mild eccentricity which is a culturally beloved trait in the UK and a hallmark of James May’s personal brand. 

 

As PBS says the hobby of plastic model building and it’s associated sub genres can foster behaviours that could be associated with autisim.

But that doesn’t mean that everyone who partakes in the hobby is on the Autistic Spectrum.  Some folk will be some folk won’t. 

 

 

And some of us are just friggin' weird! We all usually like each other here, but if we were to meet up and spend some close-up, one-on-one time together, I'm sure there would be some great dislikes. And before anyone says it, I include myself in the " weird " group and one of the " most likely to offend ".

 

 

Chris

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2 hours ago, dogsbody said:

My wife says I have OCD. No, wait! She says I'm anal retentive. No, that's not it. She said I'm a rectal orifice! ( I can't use the actual words she called me because those words are verboten here ).

 

But, yes, I'm with Beardie. The general population are more than annoying. That's why I'm enjoying my retirement so much. I don't have to go out among them too often nor for very long.

 

 

Chris

My wife says I have two faults, I don't listen and something else...

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My wife also says that I have just two faults........everything I say and everything I do. Bless her.

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I have Aspergers and high functioning autism.

I also have PTSD, clinical depression and anxiety disorder.

This is why I'm no fun at parties.

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My heart goes out to you Steve, my oldest lad has all of that except the PTSD & I know what a challenge socialising can be for him. Hang in there.

Steve.

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9 hours ago, NAVY870 said:

 

This is why I'm no fun at parties.

That's  a pity, I bet you'd have some great A-4 stories to tell.  

Although I'm  not completely convinced that a party with that as the main topic of conversation is one that many people outside of BM would want to go to :)

 

Well at least you know what you have.  I know what my Baron-cohen score suggests, but you can't believe everything you read on the internet.  I suspect if I really was, then I wouldn't be able to go out to social functions in the first place, rather then turning up, sitting in a corner and saying next to nothing for an hour , and leaving at the earliest opportunity.

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Just did that Baron-Cohen test (I wasn't aware of it and thought it might be something to do with that Borat(alleged comedian) fella). Seems it doesn't work automatically online and you have to score yourself roughly from a key of points at the bottom. I think I scored two or three points but I do disagree even over those as the answer could either score as a point for autism spectrum trait or simply that "Playing imaginary games with kids" or "Going to the Theatre" just ain't your thing.

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7 hours ago, Beardie said:

Just did that Baron-Cohen test (I wasn't aware of it and thought it might be something to do with that Borat(alleged comedian) fella). Seems it doesn't work automatically online and you have to score yourself roughly from a key of points at the bottom. I think I scored two or three points but I do disagree even over those as the answer could either score as a point for autism spectrum trait or simply that "Playing imaginary games with kids" or "Going to the Theatre" just ain't your thing.

Quite. On other more detailed tests I am completely normal - just lacking in communication/people skills. In other words a stereotypical nerd. And agree that Borat , like Ricky Gervais, just plain isn't funny.

 

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12 minutes ago, IanHx said:

Borat , like Ricky Gervais, just plain isn't funny.

Thanks for that, I’d wondered if it was just me.

 

Dennis

 

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20 minutes ago, DMC said:

Thanks for that, I’d wondered if it was just me.

Nope, we walk among you. :D

Steve.

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There's no simple test you can do on the electric interweb thing that will give you anything more than a vague idea.

My own tests took several months to come up with the correct diagnosis, this "on the spectrum thing" is a misnomer. Everybody is on the spectrum

only most people are on the neuro-typical end. 

 

I only found out after my son started going to school, he was showing some autistic behaviour which a lot of people noticed and I didn't see at all.

After he got diagnosed it was suggested that I might get done as well, didn't get off my fundament until last year to get it done.

I thought I was just a very odd bad tempered chap who wasn't over fond of humans in general. One of the first things you hear when discussing autism with other who are

it is often feels like your from another planet (explains why I've been known to call myself a Cylon)

 

Turns out Autism and Aspies isn't illness or such, its basically a different operating system, best way to describe it is like running Mac in a Windows world. We see the world and process information 

quite differently to neuro-typicals. Some days it works quite well and others can easily overload the system. That never ends well.

 

PTSD and the other bits came from living in an abusive household as a child, coupled with the aspie's inability to read facial expression etc created a childhood I wouldn't wish on a dog. That left me so screwed up for so long.

The joy of PTSD is you live continually in survival mode, everything is a threat. That gets tiring.

 

On the plus side if I didn't have Asperger's I wouldn't know so much about Sea Venom's and such. 

I don't think I'd like that

 

 

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As navy said online tests are suspect, I barely score as an aspie but given I’ve been diagnosed for almost 2 decades and never had any reason to doubt it. Also navy hit the nail with the OS analogy, our brains run the same hardware with different software packages that make us see the world and react to it differently, in some ways that can be less than satisfactory to us and those around us. 

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 I'm not autistic. I'm a very gregarious high-functioning depressive with mild social anxiety.  It seems oxymoronic, but I make friends quickly, I enjoy attention from others,  and  generally enjoy being with people. But hot damn does it A LOT OF EFFORT and preparation to get myself out into a crowd. 

It's work! 

And nothing helps me relax more after work than sitting down with a beer and a model. 

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On 3/9/2019 at 10:23 AM, BlobMan said:

This feels like something that could get me in a lot of trouble, but just know I don't intend to offend anyone. Sorry If I have. :sorry: 

 

I'm not autistic myself, I was just wondering if any of you are. I wonder if scale modeling is one of things that stereotypical autistic people do, like draw pictures of trains. To be honest, I wouldn't be surprised if I was some degree of autistic. 

 

Discuss.

My son is autistic and he has extremely focussed interests - to the extent that, unless he has something else to focus on (such as school), he spends all of his time thinking about them or acting them out. No model aeroplanes or trains for him though. His focussed interests are vacuum cleaners and bin lorries (garbage trucks for our American friends). He tends to switch between the two every 6-9 months or so, which is roughly the amount of time it takes for him to get fed up with whichever of the two he is interested in at a given point in time. He's fairly high functioning, but goes to a special school as he struggles massively with a lot of things and simply couldn't cope in a mainstream school (plus the Head Teacher at his last school was a callous scumbag who couldn't wait to get rid of him, not that I'm bitter about it). 

 

Others have commented that there is a difference between autism and autistic traits. That's very true. Autism is one of those conditions where you would have to accumulate enough 'points' in a test in order to get a diagnosis. Just liking planes (or trains, if you're a proper weirdo) is not enough. My son's autism affects him in a way that can be completely debilitating. A lot of the time he simply can't do things that you or I wouldn't think twice about doing. Not because he doesn't want to do them, but because he is overwhelmed by anxiety caused by the demands of every day life (look up Pathological Demand Avoidance if you want to see what it can be like at its worst). To be honest with you, I don't tend to dwell on the future too much at the moment, I don't know if my son will ever be able to live an independent life. I suspect not, but we are working hard to change this as care for adults like him is appalling in this country. Many adults with more severe autism end up being effectively locked up in secure hospitals. The thought of him trying to find his place in the world when I'm no longer around to look after him makes me feel sick. 

 

Sorry, I've rambled on a bit more than I meant to. But yes, focussed interests are one sign of autism but there are many other signs as well.

 

10 hours ago, NAVY870 said:

There's no simple test you can do on the electric interweb thing that will give you anything more than a vague idea.

My own tests took several months to come up with the correct diagnosis, this "on the spectrum thing" is a misnomer. Everybody is on the spectrum

only most people are on the neuro-typical end. 

Very true. One of my breakthrough moments in understanding my son's autism was when I realised that the spectrum is not a linear scale, with 'not at all autistic' at one end and 'completely autistic' at the other. It's not like that at all. Some people with autism will have no problems with certain things (motor function, sensory) but struggle hugely with other things (such as focussed interests). That's why diagnosis can take a long time and be quite complex. Autistic people can also be very vulnerable to stereotyping (hence the idea that all modellers are 'on the spectrum'. The truth is that people with autism are as different from one another as people without autism are. This diagram explains it nicely:

 

gao-17-109_fig2.jpg

 

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