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junglierating

BEA 2019 STYLE

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Absolutely magnificent and by far the classic BEA colours , remember the Viscount , Vanguard and Comet in that scheme on Saturday mornings at Turnhouse when there for ATC Air Experience flying back in the mid-1960s.

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Iy is looking real good but can someone explain what "The upper surfaces have remained grey to meet current wing-paint reflectivity requirements" really means.

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Presumably if they are going to provide the full "retro" BEA service, they'll be out on strike soon?:giggle:

 

I do like the concept of the retro schemes though. Very refreshing in today's aviation environment.

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4 hours ago, Orso said:

Iy is looking real good but can someone explain what "The upper surfaces have remained grey to meet current wing-paint reflectivity requirements" really means.

 

It'll either be visibility for other aircraft in flight, or thermal absorbtion from sunlight, and giving due consideration to the mechanical properties of materials within which can lose much of their strength quickly if the wing greenhouses the heat. That's why most composite structures on aircraft are painted white or at least light colours.

 

Very reflective is good. Very absorbtive is bad.

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I've also heard that there are regulations governing contrast between  the basic wing colour and emergency escape route  markings on the wing.

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Heat could be the answer. I think that was the reason for the Pepsi-Concorde to keep the white wings.

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3 hours ago, Eric Mc said:

I've also heard that there are regulations governing contrast between  the basic wing colour and emergency escape route  markings on the wing.

Which is why, also you'll note the "negative/inverse/contrast" call it what you will surround to the pax doors.

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2 hours ago, Orso said:

Heat could be the answer. I think that was the reason for the Pepsi-Concorde to keep the white wings.

Concorde had very unique temperature factors to consider that don't apply to subsonic airliners.

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It sure had but I have a hard time believe that a grey wing would be easier for other planes to see than a red, or that a white emergency escape route marking on the wing should have less contrast on a red wing than on a grey.

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On 3/6/2019 at 1:49 AM, Orso said:

Can someone explain what "The upper surfaces have remained grey to meet current wing-paint reflectivity requirements" really means.

There is an article about that very subject in Flight Global

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Much smarter than the usual BA scheme.  I wonder if they'll do a Speedjack aircraft.

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I am doubtful re Speedjack. 4th retro scheme surely has to be Negus BA?

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That is such a smart scheme, I’d vote for BA repainting all their 320 family aircraft.

 

Trevor

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On 3/6/2019 at 5:32 AM, Jamie @ Sovereign Hobbies said:

 

It'll either be visibility for other aircraft in flight, or thermal absorbtion from sunlight, and giving due consideration to the mechanical properties of materials within which can lose much of their strength quickly if the wing greenhouses the heat. That's why most composite structures on aircraft are painted white or at least light colours.

 

Very reflective is good. Very absorbtive is bad.

 

I agree Jamie. I have no idea how much composite material is used on the 319, nor what the various other materials heat tolerances are, but this is very similar to what is done wit most composite and modern mixed structures - why almost all modern sailplanes are white almost entirely !

 

From a visibility standpoint red upper wings are less useful than might be supposed by viewing on the ground. Trials demonstrated years ago that even dayglo colours against a light background are not seen more readily, which is why so many RAF training types now use gloss black for visibility.

 

That is a very nicely done and for me nostalgic scheme. I flew on Herons, Viscounts,  Vanguards and a Herald and Trident in that scheme.

 

John

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