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tonyot

For Our American Friends,......B-17 Mi Amigo, crashed in Sheffield UK,....Never Forgotten!

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Hiya Folks,

                Since a B-17 named Mi Amigo crashed in Sheffield in Yorkshire during WW2,...... it has never been forgotten by locals and one man created a monument to the 10 man crew who died. Today thousands of locals turned out to pay their respects and see a combined fly by carried out by the RAF & USAF,.......massive respect and never forgotten; 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-south-yorkshire-47323045

 

 

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2019/02/22/pensioner-tends-memorial-us-airmen-saved-arranges-flypast-honour/?fbclid=IwAR1kgNtVPD0h9mqWWKZIqLBwYpPxP45z6BQSUBl__xlZR3LEQ1sKjkc2Ukk

 

Edited by tonyot

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I am sure that one of the Officers talking from Lakenheath said that although they are remembering this crew they actually lost 43 planes that day alone!

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29 minutes ago, ivan-o said:

I am sure that one of the Officers talking from Lakenheath said that although they are remembering this crew they actually lost 43 planes that day alone!

Roger A Freeman (Mighty Eighth War Diary) confirms that + additional 4 planes written off after landing.

 

There were 799 planes dispatched that day but only 99 reached their intended target due to weather conditions.

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On 2/23/2019 at 9:06 AM, ivan-o said:

I am sure that one of the Officers talking from Lakenheath said that although they are remembering this crew they actually lost 43 planes that day alone!

 

On 2/23/2019 at 9:41 AM, Paul821 said:

Roger A Freeman (Mighty Eighth War Diary) confirms that + additional 4 planes written off after landing.

 

There were 799 planes dispatched that day but only 99 reached their intended target due to weather conditions.

 

Whilst the loss of any aircrew on the 22 Feb 1944 should never be forgotten. The self sacrifice by the crew of Mi Amigo on that day deserves the special remembrance that it was afforded by the USAAF & RAF this year.

 

Badly damaged following the raid possibly by flak and certainly by the Luftwaffe on its return leg Mi Amigo was lost some 80 miles from its Northamptonshire base. Emerging from bad weather and with engines failing they found themselves looking over a heavily populated area, probably never knowing it was Sheffield, with little options for landing they spotted an open grassed area and headed for Endcliffe Park. As they did their last engine began to splutter and fail, the park was their last hope! To their horror a group of kids were playing in the park with no power the options were stark. Endcliffe Park sits at a low altitude and by now the aircraft would have been below the surrounding hills without engines so climbing away was not an option. The park is small crash and landing beyond the kids was not possible. A crash was now inevitable but where? Other than the small wood that borders the park anywhere else would have meant crashing into housing with the loss of civilian life. The crew chose to sacrifice their only chance of life and it is for that reason that Mi Amigo hold a very special place in the hearts and memories of Sheffield people. This was not just another crash it was a unique sacrifice on the day and a rare event in the whole war.

 

The flypast was a fitting tribute to their self sacrifice.

 

:poppy:First Lieutenant John Glennon Krieghauser, pilot.

:poppy:Second Lieutenant Lyle J Curtis, co-pilot

:poppy:Second Lieutenant John W Humphrey, navigator

:poppy:Second Lieutenant Melchor Hernandez, bombardier

:poppy:Staff Sergeant Robert E Mayfield, radio operator

:poppy:Staff Sergeant Harry W Estabrooks, engineer / top turret gunner
:poppy:Sergeant Charles H Tuttle, ball-turret gunner
:poppy:Sergeant Maurice O Robbins, tail gunner
:poppy:Sergeant Vito R Ambrosio, right waist gunner
:poppy:Muster Sergeant George U Williams, left waist gunner

 

:poppy:All aircrew lost that day

Edited by Circloy
1944 not '43

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23 hours ago, tonyot said:

Since a B-17 named Mia Amigo

Tony,

 

Hate to be a pedant but out of respect for the crew can you correct the title? The aircraft was named Mi Amigo !

 

 

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