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Kev The Modeller

Some help and advice please

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I've been given a old EOS 300 SLR (film type not digital) it's comes with various lenses and attachments.  I know next to nothing about photography or cameras, but I have been looking at buying one capable of taken decent holiday, show and model pictures for sometime rather than using my phone.   Although the camera is in fully working order and very good if not as new condition, the fact it's film really makes a non stater for what I want to use it for.   

 

Are the lenses on older non digital cameras compatible with current digital SLR's if they're I could save myself a packet and it would be such a waste to bin them and the camera.     

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The EOS 300 lens mount is the Canon EF. EF mount film lenses will mount to some Canon digital bodies, but why would you bother? The lenses that you've been given are most likely lower end, and the new versions are not only better quality but are optimised for digital cameras, which isn't just marketing guff- digital sensors need a different light path to film for them to be most effective.

 

Assuming that you want to stay with Canon and don't want to spend a fortune, have a look at what's available as a package in the Canon range- both the major camera companies (Canon and Nikon) are practically giving away entry level camera bodies these days, with good lenses. Personally I'm a high end Nikon user, but if you just want to take happy snaps with a bit of room to grow and experiment, either of the big two (or even Sony, if you must) make darn fine entry level cameras that will reward you. Feel free to contact me if you want to chat off forum.

 

Edit. Meant to add - if you have no use for the film body, you can no doubt find it a new home with a young 'art' photographer or a local polytechnic (or whatever they're called there these days). A local camera club may also be happy to take it off your hands, as film has become hip and happpening in recent years.

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Hi Rob,

 

Thanks for the reply, as I said I know next to nothing about this sort of thing, the lenses are all canon there's 4 of them and they don't look cheap to my untrained eye.  The camera and lenses were part of a collection and aren't just a cast off's, they used to belong to a mate who was a very keen photographer, who's sadly to ill to use them anymore. 

 

Do you have any recommendations for an entry level cameras ?    

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Hi Kev,

 

Go to a good camera shop  - is there a London Camera Exchange near to you? Or have a look at LCEs website . Have a look at their secondhand digital collection and see what you like and what feels best in your hand. Don't just limit yourself to Nikon/ Canon/Sony DSLRs  (digital single lens reflex) - try the mirrorless reflex cameras such as the Fuji XT10 or XT1 which are just as good as the others and lighter because they do not have any mirrors in them. Others to think about are the Olympus/ Panasonic  micro 4/3 cameras which are pretty good too. Any of these will take interchangeable lenses. And you should be able to trade in all the Canon EOS kit although I doubt you will get much from them.

 

Hope this helps,

 

John

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The lenses will work with a newer Canon body, assuming that you want to go down that route. Once you have a digital body, you can then start considering what lenses you need and whether the existing lenses are worth keeping etc. 

 

Do you know what the 4 lenses are? That would certainly help us determine how useful they'll be to you and what sort of value they might have if you wanted to sell them on. 

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I run old canon EF lenses on a digital body with few issues and good results.  Mind you the body is full frame so less issues there I think. 

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On 18/03/2019 at 16:19, NeoGothicToaster said:

 

Do you know what the 4 lenses are? That would certainly help us determine how useful they'll be to you and what sort of value they might have if you wanted to sell them on. 

I'll dig out the camera and have a look. 

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Hi, Kev. 

 

Unless you are pretty sure that you will be getting fully involved in photography (something you probably won't know until you've spent a few months practicing), I would recommend you get yourself a good "bridge" camera. These are essentially much the same as a Digital SLR, but have a non-removable lens. The image quaility of some bridges is superb. I would suggest you get a camera with a zoom range between 20 - 300mm, because - if you get into long-range shooting - you'll need the extra reach. 

 

A good number of potential photographers get a very expensive camera and quickly become disillusioned that they are not taking identical shots to ones the see in magazines, books and on-line. The reason is simple.... the professional photographers who took those images have DECADES of experience under their belts. They know when to take the best shots (they also know when they're just not going to take anything worthwhile). Granted, they are using very expensive equipment, but that is only part of the equation.  They haven't invented a camera yet which will automatically takes nothing but great pictures (I don't believe they ever will). The technology will help you, but your own abilities are the greater influence.  

 

Have a look on-line. There are dozens of photography courses out there. Look for user-reviews of those courses  and make an informed choice of which one to go for. The course will give you an appreciation of composition, exposure, depth-of-field, controlling your available light and all the other factors that produce outstanding photos. 

 

I hope this hasn't put you off. Good luck with getting in to photography - it's a great past-time to have. 

 

Chris. 

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