Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Sign in to follow this  
motogpMatt

Building a MFH kit

Recommended Posts

Morning all :)

 

Now I've been a huge fan of the Mclaren F1 GTR for a very very long time, in the striking harrods yellow and green livery I just think they look sublime. Anyways looking on hiroboy and coming across the mfh kit of the short tail... 

 

Few questions while looking absolutely stunning and a rear work of art does anyone have any experience of building this kit? This will be my first multi media kit, is there anything I will need in order to complete this kit other then the usual items to assemble pe? And finally what's the best for cleaning up the metal part?. 

 

I won't be buying said for model for a few months but any pointers muchly appricated :)

http://www.modelfactoryhiro.com/new/en/archives/8839

 

All the best matt 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MFH kits are, in my experience, the best kits on the planet: they just need a lot of time and patience to put together. In fact I have the MFH 1/12 Mazda 787B and the kit is such a masterpiece of engineering that it's taken me a year or more to put just the engine together because I just love looking at the parts in the box. Buy one and you'll see what I mean.

 

They are definitely not in the 'shake the box and add glue' league, but for me that is why I consider them incredible value for money. You pay for the hours of enjoyment you get out of putting them together AND you get an incredible model at the end of it!

 

And no I don't own shares in MFH.

 

For metal, my time-honoured method is to trim any flash with the edge of a scalpel, drawn along the seam and then finish off with a Scotchbrite pad. This will give the paint a 'key' and I always used to then apply car primer, straight from the rattle can on white metal. I recently built MFH's 1/43 Alfa TZ2 and used Mr Color primer on that with no problems.

 

I dare say I should be degreasing the metal parts, but in 35-odd years of building resin and metal kits I've never done so and not noticed anything awry.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many thanks gents :) I shall continue to put 50 quid aside each pay packet and should have one in no time, be assured I'll be asking lots of questions :)

 

All the best matt :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am relatively new to static modeling (1 year), but am I the only one asking myself whether is worth investing in MFH models or not? I elaborate: as far as I read MFH kits are often not precise, due to the nature of the manufacturing processes and materials. Often the pieces does not fit and require a lot of work to be straightened. Sure I have seen masterpieces built by many talented modelers (many here too), but I find it kinda "unfair" towards someone who spent a lot of money on a kit. I agree it's something handmade, but if I build a handcrafted piece of furniture I expect it to be well crafted, not to be corrected by expert hands. Am I saying something wrong? Not to argue, just to ask.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd completely disagree with the statement, "Often the pieces does not fit and require a lot of work to be straightened". That may apply to old car kits like John Day, FDS etc but most definitely not MFH. OK you need to tidy the parts up but that's the case with every other kit I've ever built - whatever the manufacturer. In fact if an MFH part doesn't fit, it's only because I've done something wrong.

 

I don't really understand the comment about handcrafted furniture: surely you'd make everything yourself in that example, which isn't the case with MFH. 

 

As I mentioned above, the time spent on an MFH kit and the enjoyment you get in doing it is why they are such great value. Don't confuse that with kit-bashing a poor-standard sow's ear into a silk purse. You could build an MFH kit straight from the box and end up with a masterpiece. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Sabrejet said:

I'd completely disagree with the statement, "Often the pieces does not fit and require a lot of work to be straightened". That may apply to old car kits like John Day, FDS etc but most definitely not MFH. OK you need to tidy the parts up but that's the case with every other kit I've ever built - whatever the manufacturer. In fact if an MFH part doesn't fit, it's only because I've done something wrong.

 

I don't really understand the comment about handcrafted furniture: surely you'd make everything yourself in that example, which isn't the case with MFH. 

 

As I mentioned above, the time spent on an MFH kit and the enjoyment you get in doing it is why they are such great value. Don't confuse that with kit-bashing a poor-standard sow's ear into a silk purse. You could build an MFH kit straight from the box and end up with a masterpiece. 

please don't get upset, i'm only trying to understand if it worth or not for me. I for example prefer spending much time on a model to improve it, not to make the parts fit and refine to make gaps less evident. But it's only me, maybe some other people prefer to do otherwise.. if you are telling me that modern kits fit like a tamiya kit, i am happy this way. 

5 minutes ago, Sabrejet said:

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I endorse everything Sabrejet said in post 3 and 6 above about MFH kits. Yes they are expensive but the design, moulding and engineering that goes in to each kit is without equal. There is very minimal cleaning and preparation to do on each part although in most cases you will have to drill out marked locations with the correct drill size as indicated in the instructions. The kits are engineered to very fine tolerances and you have to be very accurate in your construction, any part that does not fit is because you have got something wrong and if you do not correct it the error will be amplified as you progress.

I have built models of all types and in all mediums since the mid 1950s and can honestly say that MFH kits are without equal for absolute enjoyment in building and pure pleasure at admiring the completed model. MFH kits are my recreational d**g of choice and once hooked there is no going back.

Treat yourself to one and enjoy it! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Tankerman: I think you nailed it. I still build kits from other manufacturers, but shall keep saving and buying as many MFH issues as funds will allow. And I should also point out that they have a nasty habit of making kits of my favourite subjects. Even the motorbikes (and I'm not a 'bike fan) have me tempted!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ok thanks for the explanations, i will surely buy a MFH sooner or later. Not sure if i can afford a 1/12, i will probably go 1/24, in a not distant future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've recently started my first one and they are everything sabrejet has said and more. Its not something you can slap together in a week. They go together well so far, it is a bit different working with metal and resin but its all part of the fun. My favourite thing with them is just the weight of the model. My only negative about them is they haven't done any 1/12 bikes for a while. They're expensive for a model, no argument here, but to get a plastic kit to that kind of level you would probably spend close to that much anyway and the fact they come with all the sponsor logos for me is definitely a win. Just my $0.02

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 28/02/2019 at 10:39, AlEmu said:

Take a look at this blog: http://lezdep.blogspot.com/search/label/MFH G1-GTR

The last entry is a comparison between MFH and Aoshima. As I see it, MFH builds almost like a real car, but on a shelf its all the same.

that's exactly what i meant. If I put some considerable effort and money on a model i expect them to be seen. There's no point in modeling the pistons if they fall inside the engine, and they probably create fit problems too. If you do a blind comparison between a MFH and a corresponding tamiya equivalent, is it often so evident?

Can someone do this comparison to wash all those questions away?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, fet_thunderdome said:

that's exactly what i meant. If I put some considerable effort and money on a model i expect them to be seen. There's no point in modeling the pistons if they fall inside the engine, and they probably create fit problems too. If you do a blind comparison between a MFH and a corresponding tamiya equivalent, is it often so evident?

Can someone do this comparison to wash all those questions away?

I disagree that 'on a shelf it's all the same'. No matter what's concealed within, the MFH will always have finer shapes, thicknesses, proportions and details for the discerning eye compared to Tamiya or any other. Make no mistake there are some excellent plastic kits out there but MFH works at a different level. The real joy is the building - to any extent you wish to go. If money is the limiting factor so be it.

If your only criteria is how it looks on a shelf you can easily just buy a diecast of your favorite.

Not building unseen parts is perfectly acceptable, after all it's your labor or limitation. Many modelers do build internals because they also enjoying photographing them and then have a record when it's all closed up.

A model of the right sort can be set up in display mode with panels removed or cut-away. Modern race or super cars are difficult subjects for this because they are all streamlined and difficult to access. So you can choose accordingly - plastic models would be better for this. The subject will indicate which is the better choice.

And complete engine internals are seldom of use in any models. That's your own 'fun-per-dollar' choice. After all you will not have viewers play with the moving parts on your completed project. Nor will you remove plumbing and wiring to do that yourself. The classics are far better for building details that can be seen easily.

Look at this engine - do you care that there are no pistons or valve gear? And when the hood is down this is all hidden. But the option remains to reveal it.

Choose wisely which appeals to you most.

 

IMG-6615-M.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Difficult to explain unless you've seen it, but comparing MFH to Tamiya is like comparing a fine scale model to a child's diecast. They both do a job but at different levels. For me, MFH make kits for modellers who want 100% while Tamiya make kits for those who want quick results and are OK with 90%. You decide which you want and go for it. I think a number of folks here have tried to explain/demonstrate that but it sounds like you've made your mind up anyway. Horses for courses - there's no right or wrong if it's what you want.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Consider also tamiya kit with a detail/superdetail set (SMS, Top Studio or Hobby Design). Almost as fine as mfh, but still significantly cheaper and easier to build

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...