Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

TGA

Best starter 1/8 model kit

Recommended Posts

Since a lot of people have been saying 1:8 is the way to go and I love the idea of being able to super detail things I was wondering what you guys would consider a good 1:8 model to start with (that isn't overly expensive). What are your thoughts? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tough question with several possible answers my friend. To be helpful, some questions have to be asked of you first.

The first is an honest assessment of your skill level -experienced or novice?

Next is what you consider 'overly expensive'?

There are several 'inexpensive' 1/8 kits to be found by Monogram or Revell of 1/8 muscle cars which are at the 'easiest' level of construction. They can be nicely detailed however. Of the Pocher classics, the 1907 FIAT can be considered a 'starter' kit for Pochers. But it is more expensive and complex than the first choice. The Pocher presents a good out of box build but really improves with added detail - your skill and choice.

Other Pocher kits - classic and contemporary -  are levels (way)  up in complexity, cost and rarity.

Beware Pocher kits of Porsches and Ferraris which generally go unbuilt and get quickly sold on the auctions.

There are many beautiful 1/8 builds here both kit and scratchbuilt; a search will be educational.

Hope that helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It does indeed help, kind sir. I would say I am somewhere in between novice and experienced. I have a fair understanding of how things work but I definitely wouldn't consider myself to be experienced. More like an enthusiastic amateur in all honesty. I do think the Pocher kits are very expensive indeed however I feel they might be worth investing in. I have recently gotten really interested in cars from the 1920s-1930s and I would rather build something from that era opposed to something more modern. The Pocher Bugatti T50 look absolutely amazing but it looks incredibly complicated. Might be worth testing the waters with something a bit cheaper first would you not agree? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I certainly agree a 'starter' is best way. The Bugatti is NOT entry level. See build on here by 'Crazy Crank' Thierry.

Search the FIAT and see if you like it. A reminder; extensive tools and expenses for paint (a lot of it) and materials must be considered.

As well as adequate work space and display space - these average around two feet in length...

Not trying to discourage you - the opposite in fact.

:devil:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the other hand- in terms of expense, one kit will keep you going for 18 months to two years ( often longer). You need to factor that against other hobbies or kits that you might buy in that period.... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Jo NZ said:

On the other hand- in terms of expense, one kit will keep you going for 18 months to two years ( often longer). You need to factor that against other hobbies or kits that you might buy in that period.... 

Absolutely, factor in working abroad as well as other distractions (kids).... Thanks for your input though! 

30 minutes ago, Codger said:

I certainly agree a 'starter' is best way. The Bugatti is NOT entry level. See build on here by 'Crazy Crank' Thierry.

Search the FIAT and see if you like it. A reminder; extensive tools and expenses for paint (a lot of it) and materials must be considered.

As well as adequate work space and display space - these average around two feet in length...

Not trying to discourage you - the opposite in fact.

:devil:

I am not afraid of tools, I have loads of those haha. I have been following that build and I am amazed by it. My biggest wish would have been a Bugatti T35 or T59 in 1:8 but I fear no such kit really exists, or they are rarer than hen's teeth... 

Edited by TGA

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a T35 kit in 1/8, but it's not only rarer than hen's teeth, it's also more expensive....

Edited by Jo NZ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Jo NZ said:

On the other hand- in terms of expense, one kit will keep you going for 18 months to two years ( often longer). You need to factor that against other hobbies or kits that you might buy in that period.... 

And of course you can display it part finished. Engine, then engine and chassis etc.  I regard long 

term builds as a set of mini projects, then you get the satisfaction of actually finishing something.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Jo NZ said:

There is a T35 kit in 1/8, but it's not only rarer than hen's teeth, it's also more expensive....

Is that the Wespe T35 you're on about? I have a few gripes with that one, it is very expensive and to be blunt not very good! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, TGA said:

Is that the Wespe T35 you're on about? I have a few gripes with that one, it is very expensive and to be blunt not very good! 

It appears I have underestimated your familiarity with the subject. Apologies for that; only meant to inform, not give sermons.

I just realized you're the perpetrator of the 1/18 Burago in progress. You certainly know your way around an airbrush and glue.

Shifting gears, I now can recommend either the Pocher Muletto or Monza. But not the highly innacurate Spyder (see Endeavor's thread) - You certainly appear up to that kind of challenge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, TGA said:

Is that the Wespe T35 you're on about? I have a few gripes with that one, it is very expensive and to be blunt not very good! 

No it 's the Art Collection Auto/ J P Fontanelle one, with brass body panels. There were only 25 kits made. I think I've seen one kit change hands in about 10 years.  Told you it was rarer than hen's teeth!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Codger said:

It appears I have underestimated your familiarity with the subject. Apologies for that; only meant to inform, not give sermons.

I just realized you're the perpetrator of the 1/18 Burago in progress. You certainly know your way around an airbrush and glue.

Shifting gears, I now can recommend either the Pocher Muletto or Monza. But not the highly innacurate Spyder (see Endeavor's thread) - You certainly appear up to that kind of challenge.

 

No problem my friend. I'm very glad to have your feedback and input. I'll definitely look into it. I have stumbled across a big Pocher collection for sale. Might be worth investing in and selling on the kits I don't want.... Choices, choices...... 

7 hours ago, Jo NZ said:

No it 's the Art Collection Auto/ J P Fontanelle one, with brass body panels. There were only 25 kits made. I think I've seen one kit change hands in about 10 years.  Told you it was rarer than hen's teeth!

Aaah the ACA kit, a work of art in its own right. Would almost be a shame to build it. Absolutely stunning, too bad it is that rare!

Edited by TGA

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A relatively cheap way to get a Pocher is to buy a (usually badly) made up one - often seen on fLeaBay,

dismantle it and build it again using your skills.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/02/2019 at 10:39, Codger said:

The Bugatti is NOT entry level.

 

I think I'd have a different point of view. I've built the Torpedo Rolls, Monza and the Bugatti as OOB, for sales display, and I would say that the Bugatti is better produced and easier to assemble as a kit. The early versions had gears in the gearbox and a diff. As you turn the crank handle, the camshafts rotate and operate the valves, the crank rotates (viewable through the side cover on the sump) and drive goes all the way to the rear wheels, with correct diff action. It's also the easiest kit to make the brakes work. Hours of fun, holding the rear off the ground, spinning the wheels with the crank handle and then stopping them with the brake pedal....😵

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, Jo NZ said:

I think I'd have a different point of view. I've built the Torpedo Rolls, Monza and the Bugatti as OOB, for sales display, and I would say that the Bugatti is better produced and easier to assemble as a kit.

I have great respect for your opinion Jo for I feel your skill level is above mine and I have not built the Bug kit. Your Pocher work has been outstanding. I have built the Alfa Spyder and of course the Rolls.

 

I'll concede the somewhat simpler Bug does not have 80-part wire wheels and a somewhat simplified engine. My advice to our friend TGA was based on the the fact that he asked for a 'starter kit'. Knowing from experience that most all Pochers have poor leverages and materials for the working features like steering, brakes and engine movements, I discounted those models from my suggestion to him.

 

It appears that I may have misjudged his experience level by recommending the FIAT. Not my intention.  But it does  fit his bill for a beautiful replica at reasonable entry fee.

 

Also, he requested a selection that 'isn't overly expensive' - something that may be considered of the Bugatti more than the FIAT. The point made earlier about 'fun per/dollar/hour' is certainly valid but I have no idea what Tom considers 'expensive'. Certainly a $1000+ USD Bugatti kit is in that range. And I surely do not wish to limit his ambition or 'fun quotient'.

 

My comments were only made as suggestions for I'm certainly not the Last Word on Pochers...:worthy:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I can't do the last word either. Never built a Merc, for a start! I know that TGA said that he was looking for something inexpensive and a starter kit, but he does seem to like Bugattis.

You said that the Bugatti had a simplified engine. The early ones had a gear drive off the front of the crank that spun the cams and operated metal valves and springs. Has that disappeared along with the differential?

 

I just remembered that I have built another Pocher - the Testarossa. I'd forgotten it because it wasn't really a pleasant experience.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I highly respect all of your opinions and I shall definitely keep them in mind if I make my decision. I'll probably work on some more models before and go for something decent after summer. Something is definitely pulling me towards the Pocher kits which, for the considerable time it will take me to assemble one, I would say are great value for money. I am madly in love with Bugatti at the moment but that Alfa 8C Monza is so very tempting too..... Maybe I'll get myself that damned Wespe T35 and completely redo it, but what's the use in that? Too many choices!!!! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Jo NZ said:

Yes, I can't do the last word either. Never built a Merc, for a start! I know that TGA said that he was looking for something inexpensive and a starter kit, but he does seem to like Bugattis.

You said that the Bugatti had a simplified engine. The early ones had a gear drive off the front of the crank that spun the cams and operated metal valves and springs. Has that disappeared along with the differential?

 

I just remembered that I have built another Pocher - the Testarossa. I'd forgotten it because it wasn't really a pleasant experience.....

That Testarossa seems to come floating past every now and again. What's wrong with that kit? I have seen many a half built Testarossa or ones for parts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, TGA said:

That Testarossa seems to come floating past every now and again. What's wrong with that kit? I have seen many a half built Testarossa or ones for parts.

Follow Jo's advice above as well as this; I had the TR new in the '90's. After thoroughly inspecting it, I sold it - unbuilt. I can give you a litany of what's wrong with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, Jo NZ said:

.You said that the Bugatti had a simplified engine. The early ones had a gear drive off the front of the crank that spun the cams and operated metal valves and springs. Has that disappeared along with the differential?

 

 

Far as I know that is still true. But by 'simplified' I meant the castings of the induction, block and heads, not a lack of working features. They are just blocks of metal shapes, lacking the beauty of the Alfas, Rolls and Benz. Subject to individual taste of course.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I may Tom, for inspiration I suggest a look at the site of David Cox, Pocher Specialist. There you will find Pochers of every stripe and some highly modified, extreme ones too. David is a commission builder but his favorite customer is himself. He also welcomes questions and contact.

In the Photo Album, you will see a Rolls with a few build photos that looks familiar ...:devil:

http://www.detailedmodelcars.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Codger said:

Follow Jo's advice above as well as this; I had the TR new in the '90's. After thoroughly inspecting it, I sold it - unbuilt. I can give you a litany of what's wrong with it.

Oh please do. You' ve gotten me all excited now haha. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the Pocher Testarossa in my part-built stash.

Too many problems to complete.

Some very weird things for an 8th scale kit.

The rear-view mirrors bolt to the doors. If you look at the Tamiya 1/24th TR, they are mounted on the A pillar!

 

I don't think that this will ever get built. Avoid!

 

Cheers, Alan.

Edited by Alan R

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Alan R said:

I have the Pocher Testarossa in my part-built stash.

...........

The rear-view mirrors bolt to the doors. If you look at the Tamiya 1/24th TR, they are mounted on the A pillar!

 

Cheers, Alan.

I believe that the early TRs had a single high rear-view mirror, but legislation meant that subsequent cars had two lower fitted mirrors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, the single A-pillar mounted mirror was only installed on early Testarossa's.

 

I've build 2 Pocher TR's and 5 F-40's. Curious to find out what you find wrong about the TR kit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×