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Shar2

Royal Navy Signal Flags. 1:350

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Royal Navy Signal Flags

Eduard 1:350

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Quite a few maritime kits these days provide a selection of flags and pennants that are printed on paper.  These can look ok, but generally always have a tired well worn look, like they’ve been left in the sun for a few months.  Eduard have now countered this look with the release of this pre-painted steel set, which supersedes the etched brass set previously available. The forty five flags and ten pennants are beautifully painted and will look great either as a coded message from a halyard or two or even on a ship dressed overall, although it would have to be modelled for a calm day as, even though the metal is quite thin I doubt you’d be able to replicate a flapping flag too easily. To use, just cut the chosen flag from the sheet and wrap it around your favourite rigging material.

 

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Conclusion

This is a very nice and easy to use set which would add a dash, or even a lot of colour depending on how many you use. Please note however these flags are based on the 1937 Royal Navy signaling Handbook so for use on ships from that time up until the new, revised handbook was issued during the war, where the flags for P and Q were swapped over, and is where the phrase “Mind your P’s and Q’s” comes from. So, research is your friend when it comes to modelling.

 

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Review sample courtesy of 


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1 hour ago, Shar2 said:

where the flags for P and Q were swapped over, and is where the phrase “Mind your P’s and Q’s” comes from.

Do you have a reference for that? It's not a derivation I've heard of before.

Thanks,

Brian

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I should have put may have been where the phrase came from, but the actual phrase could be older.  It does fit though within Naval parlance.

 

To quote the actual wording from the page I was searching. "While this may be fittingly related to the phrase "to mind one's P's and Q's", it may have happened too late to be its origin; that origin has also been claimed for printing with metal type, as the reversed forms of those letters on the type slugs can be confusing to distinguish, and for the tally of pints and quarts consumed on credit in a British pub, and several other possibilities are also still considered."

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