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Scratch-built 1/72 Savoia Marchetti S.64 - 1928


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A build from 12 years ago:

 

Long range planes were in vogue in different countries at the time when the record fever was burning high.

This elegant monoplane was designed by Alessandro Marchetti aiming to conquer the endurance and distance records.

First flown in 1928, the unusually configured machine demonstrated that the potential was there to intent the planned feat. The S.64 was in a way a sort of motor-glider, with a large wing area and minimal extras, capable of accommodating a crew of three in a small pod blended with the wing, on top of which the engine –a Fiat A 22T- was enclosed inside a streamlined gondola. Construction was mostly of wood –even the wings were covered in plywood- and the struts were metal.

It conquered the distance and endurance records in closed circuit and later, in a flight to Brazil, in straight distance.

In 1929 a second machine, the S.64 bis, with minor modifications, re-conquered the records that by then were in the hands of France and Germany. None of the machines survived long

 

Thanks to Fabrizio D’Isanto, Jim Schubert and all the modelers that helped with information and advice.

 

A perfect reference for this build is Paolo Miana's "L'ala di gabbiano con la finezza di uno Stradivario" "Seagull wing with the finesse of a Stradivarius"

 

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In contrast with the Joy 1935, this one certainly looks like it can fly – which it obviously did, and well, too.

 

At the same time, it has a distinct Porco Rosso air about it, doesn't it?

 

Impressive scratch build, as always!

 

Kind regards,

 

Joachim

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I can't imagine that their is much reference material for this subject (like most of your subjects) and it's impressive that you and others can pull what little their is and build it/ them... very impressive.

:goodjob:

 

Stuart

Edited by Courageous
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4 hours ago, Spitfire31 said:

At the same time, it has a distinct Porco Rosso air about it, doesn't it?

 

I also thought that it looked like the precursor to Porco Rosso's plane!

 

Again, a lovely job Moa.

 

Regards,

David 

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9 hours ago, Courageous said:

I can't imagine that their is much reference material for this subject

Hi Stuart: but there is:

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8 hours ago, Jonners said:

Can I ask what material you used for the cockpit and engine nacelles? 

Of course Jonners: it's a bakeable polymer called FIMO.

You shape it like plasticine, put it in the kitchen oven, and it becomes a solid plastic that can be sanded and painted.

At that time I was using it a lot on my models, later I started to carve the shapes in wood and vacuform a shell.

Cheers

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8 hours ago, JWM said:

That is nice! (and military - rare for you!) :)

Cheers

J-W

  

What? don't say so! I will stomp on it! Oh, the horror!

Actually it had no military use, ever, so it is in that grey area of military backed projects with civil projections (like the Douglas "around the world machines", or the Argentinian Fokker CVs Ciudad de Buenos Aires and Provincia de Buenos Aires, that attempted it too. Prestige flights one may say.

But I will put the model in alcohol to disinfect it right now, just in case.

 

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2 hours ago, Moa said:

Of course Jonners: it's a bakeable polymer called FIMO.

Thanks very much - I've heard of Fimo but never used it.  

 

Incidentally, I've been looking through your Wings of Intent website (led there via the comment on the De Havilland No1 thread elsewhere on BM). Very interesting - thanks for going to the trouble. Well said, by the way, for your observations about modelling civ vs mil aviation.

 

Jon

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That is a verygraceful and aesthetically pleasing machine. As always you have made a superb model and the photographs are top notch. Another unknown to me - so much still to learn!

 

P

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nice bit of scratching. (build not itch)

 

i think some scratch builds end up looking more like the actual thing than a kit

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