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1/32 Spitfire Cockpit Brassin - fitting.


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My first time using one of these set. Little query. In the instructions it shows to remove some of the kits sidewall before installing the resin part.

What is the best way to get this done so that it is  removed equally so the resin sits in well? Is it simply trial and error? Should the outline of the area to be thinned be marked and only this worked, or the larger part of the fuselage regardless?


TIA

 

Simon

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2 hours ago, Stealthman said:

Are we talking about removing existing moulded detail or thinning out the overall sidewall? Which kit is it?

Probably both I'm guessing. It's a wee while since I looked at the kit, been waiting for the Eduard stuff to arrive. Revell's  IXc.

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I imagine it certainly means removing all the moulded detail as I believe the Brassin sets are effectively fully enclosed resin cockpits that literally sit between the fuselage halves. A few people I know use Dremels for removing moulded items and thinning the walls. 

Much easier to use the Tamiya kit along with a few Barracuda bits.

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3 hours ago, Stealthman said:

I imagine it certainly means removing all the moulded detail as I believe the Brassin sets are effectively fully enclosed resin cockpits that literally sit between the fuselage halves. A few people I know use Dremels for removing moulded items and thinning the walls. 

Much easier to use the Tamiya kit along with a few Barracuda bits.

Thanks. Must dig the box out again.

 

Have a couple of variants of the Tamiya spit too.

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In my extremely limited experience with this, how you do it doesn't matter, as long as you don't get carried away!  How MUCH you need to remove depends upon the particular set- in some cases it ends up seeming as if there isn't enough plastic available to remove in order for there to be "enough room".

 

A well designed cockpit set will give you what's within sight, so Dremeling outside the lines won't generally matter.  It also doesn't really matter how precisely you smooth behind the resin, so long as you haven't left a high point.  Be careful that you don't take away more at the perimeter (especially cockpit sills, etc) than you do in the middle, though, or you'll have trouble making the edge meet the "host".

 

As a novice, the main thing is patience, a wee bit of caution, and plenty of test fitting.  (That patience bit is probably why I'm still a novice with resin cockpits...)

 

And finally, don't let the "snobs" (like me) give you a hard time about the Revell kit- you've shown that you know the difference by saying that you do have Tamiya Spits.  That being the case, there's no shame in messing around with "the other kit".  Actually, it's probably an excellent choice for trying some resin on.

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 Patience is certainly the key with copious amounts of test fitting! I must admit the Tamiya Spits are worth the money, but can still be improved. If nobody produces a better Mk Vb than the Hobbyboss kit ( come on Tamiya!!) Then I might be looking at a new resin cockpit for the kit.

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