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Hi guys, 

Sitting on on the shelf is a Revell 1:300 scale research vessel Meteor. 

The railings all look really chunky from the kit parts. 

I can't seem to find any 1:300 photoetch detail parts or railings. Would 1:350 look silly? I've seen a few 1:350 general ship detailing parts around but would they look odd at the difference in scales? 

TIA 

Jered. 

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8 hours ago, Jered said:

Would 1:350 look silly?

IMHO, no, they'd be miles better than the kits offering.

 

Stuart

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I would agree, that 1:350 railings would be much better than the overscale plastic ones in the kit.   I've been looking for one of those myself, as it is an interesting subject for me; so I'll be watching along if you can post photos of your build.

 

Mike

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Cheers guys. 

As long as you don't mind waiting a little while for it to start. 

I'm actually contemplating designing my own fret of PE for the model as I've found the ship's manual and scale drawings. Railings, ladders, chimney cowling and crane detail could then all be possibilities 

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It is possible to home produce PE but it involves nasty chemicals.

 

I've use the company in the link below, thay charge £20-30 for the set up and an etching cost(depends on the size of the fret and type and thickness of metal) plus VAT. They keep the design on file for 5 years after the last order. I've done several frets for the 1/72nd scale Revell Flower Class kit and sold enough copies to cover the set up costs.

 

Link - www.ppdltd.com

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Ah that's excellent, thank you. 

I did have a look at what was involved with home etching but the cost of setting up, learning what looks like quite a complex skill and as you say - the chemicals - I'd rather play to my strengths, ie. drafting and just do the design work then sub it out to someone who's already proficient at etching. 

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