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Moa

McClary "A" "Motorglider", 1929. Scratchbuilt, 1/72.

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Before we continue to enjoy our hobby -as he would have liked-, I want to make a brief homage to James (Jim) Schubert, who passed away just a few days ago.

Jim was a very good friend, a Boeing engineer for many decades, with a long and successful career. He was as active at his 85 years old as he ever was, and regaled us all with his vast, seemingly inexhaustible knowledge on aviation and modelling and a plethora of other matters. I knew him for many years, and often, sometimes seriously, sometimes tongue-in-cheek, embroidered his name in my modeling posts, many times here at BM. He was a very, very, very good friend, to me and to many. Aviation and modeling is what gather us here, and that's how I met him, and he was an extremely important mentor for me (and again many others) in those matters.

But there is something, for me far more important than his aviation career or knowledge, or his excelling modeling skills: he was an extraordinary human being, a classy gentleman, educated, polite, intelligent, humorous, witty, kind and always friendly and ready to help.

His models are extraordinary, but what I admire the most is his true quality as a human being, sadly not very common nowadays.

Dear Jim, your laughter and your incomparable, kind, warm, sometimes mischievous smile, will stay with us; even as you fly yonder.

 

 

This is an old build, from 11 years ago, with the original text:

 

Between 1929 and 1931, Mr. McClary developed a series of prototypes of which not much photographic evidence remains. The Model A is what you see here, according to Aerofiles. It seems that it was considered a motorglider.

Unfortunately there is no record of it ever flying, but I am an optimist.

Control was obtained mainly by fervent praying, but also through elevators and rudder, and some sort of ailerons protruding from the…-I guess I should say wing, although I am not totally certain.

This sort of flattened zeppelin ,although simple in appearance, offers certain challenges, not being the lesser one the absence of 3 views. I concocted one in my periods of lucidity.

Areas that will need attention are the engine (55 parts) the wheels (of the spoke type) and the various struts and protrusions. On the engine and its cowling aluminum sheet, styrene, solder and a home-made metalized vacuformed part were all used. Some generic interior was built into the pilot gondola too.

It looked simple enough at the beginning, but after all the dust settled down the count of parts surpassed the 140 mark. Nothing a normal modeler can’t deal with. If we could only find a normal modeler.

In 1/72 the model has a reasonable size, not too small, not too big, which makes handling easier. Nevertheless, a number of parts had to be made twice or three times in order to get a reasonable result.

The unusual shape dictated equally unusual production of parts and assembly procedures, not to mention that you normally make the fuselage and then glue the wings to it, but in this case you make the (only) wing and glue the fuselage to it. Then you glue the tail surfaces to the wing too. Feels strange, but the same can be said of the plane, isn’t it?

McClary went on to design other interesting places if on slightly more conventional lines.

Is contemplating these kind of designs that I start to see fine art in aviation.

01.jpg

 

01a.jpg

 

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03a.jpg

 

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09.jpg

 

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14.jpg

 

A link to some photos of the real thing:

https://1000aircraftphotos.com/Contributions/Shumaker/6191L.htm

 

 

 

Edited by Moa

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That's the most unusual one yet. It's a fascinating little aeroplane nonetheless. 

It's as if a parmesan cheese shaver too to the skies. 

Beautifully crafted as ever from your fine stable. 

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The most unlikely looking contraption to date? On closer examination, I suppose the design must have had some foundation in logic and in aerodynamics. Did it actually fly?

 

What a beautiful conversation piece, in model form! It would go well in a dio with the sort of roadster visible in the background of this photo, to give a scale reference and general era indication:

6191L-3.jpg

 

Wonderfully delicate little model!

 

Kind regards,

 

Joachim

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Spitfire31 said:

Did it actually fly?

Hi Joachim

As it says above:

"Unfortunately there is no record of it ever flying, but I am an optimist."

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3 minutes ago, Moa said:

Hi Joachim

As it says above:

"Unfortunately there is no record of it ever flying, but I am an optimist."

 

Oops, sorry – missed that sentence in my eagerness to pore over your lovely model photos.

 

I take it that your optimism concerns the wellbeing of the potential pilot and, God forbid, the passengers – should the 'A Motorglider' ever have left terra firma.

 

Kind regards,

 

Joachim

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Extraordinary, both the real thing and your beautiful model! I would like to think that it could and did fly - it does look sort of possible?

 

God Speed Jim.

 

Cheers

 

Malcolm

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I thought at first that this was a joke or a WHIF! A superb piece of scratchbuilding of a most unusual type. It remind ed me of the experimental types that proloiferated in the first decade of powered heavier than air flight... athrowback.

 

P

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At Interview.. "I'm sorry young man, but I don't see a career in Aviation for you".

 

Great model.

 

John

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9 hours ago, Baldy said:

t does look sort of possible?

 

Stranger things have flown.....

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This subject is really something!!!!

Where did you find it?

You said no flying record?

I don't know why, but...I believe you!!!

Of course this is another piece in the aviation history puzzle you're dilighting us with!!!

Bravo!... I don't have any more superlatives!!!

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9 minutes ago, pheonix said:

It remind ed me of the experimental types that proloiferated in the first decade of powered heavier than air flight... athrowback.

 

P 

Indeed, for the time.

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Just now, Massimo said:

Where did you find it?

Where I find most of these, in old aviation magazines, or Popular Mechanics, or rummaging through aviation-related publications on the Net.

They are not difficult to find, the challenge begins when you want to build them and need more information, not to mention 3 views or plans, which are almost invariably unavailable.

Still, they make your modeling fires light up!

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10 minutes ago, John Aero said:

At Interview.. "I'm sorry young man, but I don't see a career in Aviation for you".

 

Great model.

 

John 

You are very kind John, and you made me laugh.

Still, he went on to design interesting types. Here from the National Air and Space Museum:

NASM-NASM-1B17538.jpg

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"All I said was take a look at my Stinson". That tail skid is balanced on a stick, at what point did it pierce the aeroplane?

 

Cheers

 

John

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6 minutes ago, John Aero said:

"All I said was take a look at my Stinson". That tail skid is balanced on a stick, at what point did it pierce the aeroplane?

 

Cheers

  

John

If the tail leaves the ground, does it count as a flight?

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That’s a very eloquent tribute. Jim was clearly a very special kind of person; to be remembered in that way would be very special. The world needs more genuinely good people. I’m sorry that you have lost him.

 

Once again, a fantastic model of a bizarre machine. Intriguing and inspirational in equal measure.

 

Jon

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Nice tribute to Jim.  Thanks, C.

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1 hour ago, jeaton01 said:

Nice tribute to Jim.  Thanks, C.

Thanks John.

No word makes him justice, really.

But respects must be paid when due, even when we fall short.

 

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