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What's your day-job?


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Well I have done a number of odds and ends. Originally I wanted to be a fighter pilot but excessive height and astigmatism put paid to those dreams. I qualified as a Radar and Radio technician. I was trained in analogue just as the world went digital and I never really took to digital and 'board switching' as opposed to fault finding. I then went on to become a technician in a factory making computer monitors. From that I went on to be a technician in a silicon chip manufacturing plant. During those years I also worked as and when I could as concert security doing Glastonbury festival, various other festivals and 'Raves' throughout the UK. Other times I worked as a tattooist and motorcycle mechanic. Next I was back in electronics as a technician in a company making laboratory equipement (Incubators centrifuges and the like), then a short spell as a local authority waste services labourer. After that I was a web designer and then a Graphic designer and then a Civil Servant with Jobcentre. After getting married eight years ago my new wife's health started to decline and her son was diagnosed with Autism so, for the last six or seven years, I have been out of the world of employment and been a full-time carer.

 

Dream job? I don't think I have one, 'Deep thinker about life the Universe and Everything' would probably be it. Free to go where I want and do what I please while exploring the real big questions of the meaning of it all. I used to think that I wanted to be a rock guitarist as I am a brilliant musician (even if I do say so myself) but I think the music business has little to do with the art of making music and the sex drugs and rock'n'roll lifestyle that is supposed to be part of the package leaves me utterly cold.

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Interesting thread.

 

I'd always wanted to be an RN helicopter pilot and passed the pilot aptitude tests with flying colours. But the officer selection board said I was not officer material. and they were right!

 

My first job was making photographic filters. Dyed in the mass, rather than coated, they were revolutionary back in the day.

 

Then I was a Research Assistant at a local museum, working on a project to commemorate the 40th Anniversary of D-Day. I find it hard to believe it's now almost 75 years - so that job was 35 years ago!!!!!!

 

Then spent 5 years as a Cartographic Draughtsman at the Ordnance Survey - the last of the pen and ink draughtsmen, was I.

 

Took 18 months off work to travel around the United States, where I also worked as a nanny in San Francisco. On my return, I was a "1-in-10" and did a lot of temp work for about a year, before moving to the US on a permanent basis back in 1993. 

 

For my first 5 years here, I was a Unit Secretary/Nursing Assistant in the Special Care Nursery at the local hospital  -working with premies and newborns and also helped out in pediatrics.  

 

That was way too stressful, so I worked as the Assistant to the Director at the Planes of Fame Grand Canyon. Great job, but pay was terrible, so I had to move on. 

 

Went back to college, and doubled-up as a reservations agent at a Best Western call center for 18 months, but after 9/11, that closed up. But the benefits did pay for the birth of our daughter! 

 

Then used my new degree to work in the Tech Department of the local school district for 16 years. Got totally fed up with that, so I'm now working as a Financial Associate in the Dean's office of a major college here at Northern Arizona University. I hope and expect this to be the last job I have before we retire in about 5 years! 

 

And, of course, for over ten years I was also moonlighting as a writer for modelling magazines and have had three books published. 

 

 

Edited by Paul Bradley
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I have been a truck driver for the past 20 year's .

Before that, I was a general manager for a chain of movie theater's  for 7 year's  ( yea, you get to see movie's for free..... over, and over, and over, and over, you get sick of it pretty quick.)

Before that, I floated between several  Steel mill's ,and foundry job's.

( I cant tell you what I did through High School..... Law enforcement may still be looking for me.)

 

My "dream job" ..... ( is my wife looking ? ... no ? ...)  Backstage costume fitter for the Victoria's Secret model's !!!

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Graduated with a degree in Naval Architecture and a USCG 3rd Assistant Engineer's licence. First job was at a naval architectural consultant with a lot of business in the North Sea. Traveled a fair amount, mostly to Aberdeen and Stavanger to catch helicopters out to offshore construction platforms. Left that company to work on structural mechanics at a military aircraft manufacturer, got into high-performance computing, and met my wife. Moved cross-country to work at a computer-aided engineering software company. I'm now at a computer company. My wife is a retired rocket scientist.

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All of you have lead fascinating lives, so I'm afraid mine is going to seem pretty pedestrian by comparison. 

 

At fourteen, I had to get a summer job or find myself utilized by my annoyingly tireless and industrious dad on whatever home projects he could think up, often involving shifting large numbers of wood chips seemingly to little purpose, so I applied for a job working for the Youth Conservation Corps, one of the last surviving offshoots of FDR's make-work programs from the Depression era, in this case a sort of GI Junior Civilian Conservation Corps. One of the great beauties of the YCC selection process is that it takes the democratic spirit to its logical extreme and beyond, and hiring is done without regard for talent, work ethic, or ability, (three hurdles I could never have surmounted) but instead by public lottery: names are drawn out of one of those raffle spinners. It was actually a great job for the marmoreal, grub-like teenager I was, since it got me outside, ensured I had far more exercise than I could ever have been expected to do voluntarily, and kept me far away from hot fryers or angry customers. I built a foot bridge, cleared acres of buckthorn, planted (or surreptitiously disposed of) thousands of native plants being reintroduced to the prairies of Illinois, and encountered several million hungry leeches, all without the aid of power tools, excepting a trash pump. I did that for three summers before I was catapulted over the handlebars of my bicycle by a brake lock (I'd complained that they kept locking up, but my dad told me not to be a baby about it, not that I'm mad about it or anything) and broke my arm. The program director at the time was dyslexic, so she decided to have me keep working as a personal assistant, and I helped produce our yearly report and wrote all of her correspondence, and as a result, returned the next year as an assistant crew leader, leading a work crew of Disadvantaged Youths, who promptly mutinied and beat me up (a rather effete pseudo-intellectual teen from an affluent suburb may have been a poor choice to lead sixteen year olds who were already paying child support, a bit like Noel Coward skippering the Dirty Dozen), which resulted in my getting sacked. 

 

Anyway, during this time, I was also working first as a stock boy and then as a return-to-vendor specialist at a small local shoe shop during the other three seasons of the year. The manager was a delightful eccentric who'd maintained 155mm guns in the Marines and whose greatest regret was that he had signally failed to kill an Iraqi soldier in Operation Desert Storm, though he had survived a hair-raising experience when his CH-53 collided with a telephone pole while trying to lift off with a field piece (my memory is a little hazy on this front, that doesn't sound quite right, but here we are).

 

Mainly because of luck, the weak American high school system, and a series of complicated legal maneuverings, I'd ended up graduating high school at sixteen and by extension, college at twenty, despite never being better than a mediocre and indifferent student. I then started work as an electrical installer with the security system company owned by the (mostly) harmless cult my parents belonged to, until my mom and dad decided that I was possessed by the devil, and had all of my siblings watch as I was exorcised by the church's pastor (my cousin, by the way, it's very insular, my sister married a step-cousin, a very common match for that bunch), and had all of my paychecks sent directly to them, which is technically illegal, but why let something like that spoil it? So it was time to make a hasty exit, and in the middle of church I excused myself to go to the bathroom and walked out to a waiting car and sped off. (My parents and I are on good terms now, but it took a long time.)

 

Then I ended up working as a dispatcher in a very very shady same-day-air shipping service for three years while living in grinding poverty and a condemned apartment, which had the benefit of giving me a perspective on life I think that few young men of my largely fortunate background up until that moment get to experience. If you're not familiar with same-day shipping, we were just middlemen: a client (usually a big ball-bearing firm like Motion Industries or one of their competitors) would contact us asking us to get Widget Y from point A to Point B, ASAP. We would hire a local driver to pick up, take to the airport, and put it on a commercial flight, and then hire someone on the other end to collect it and deliver it. I once inadvertently held up the opening of the Hummer 2 production line by selecting a particularly unreliable driver for the final leg of the trip, and received endless calls from the angry plant people while their VIPs all sat around stewing. Good riddance. The job was stressful, the pay was terrible, and the people I worked with were truly awful, nasty human beings. The neighborhood was also quite bad, and I was extremely out of place there; a person I sincerely hope was an undercover policeman attempted to buy cocaine from me, I was stopped and frisked by uniformed officers, someone burned an SUV down to the rims(!!!!) outside the office once, and all in all it was three lost, desperate years of my life that I'll never get back. I often wonder who I might have become without the experience.

 

After three years, I was quite fed up, and took French leave from the company (Illinois is a right to work state and we can be fired without notice, and I've always felt, in the spirit of fairness, that an employer should receive the same consideration) and ended up working as a temp in the offices of Walgreens, a large corporation that runs most of the pharmacies in the midwestern USA. This didn't last too long, and I ended up working in the call centre of a large bar association, one of my least favorite experiences professionally. At least as a dispatcher people generally afforded me a certain level of professional respect, because of the complex work one had to do to obtain a good routing, but in a call centre, they treat you like children and you're berated all day by angry people who like to punish the people at an organization who are furthest away from the problem to the maximum extent they can get away with. During this time, however, I was placed on the Morale Committee (big mistake), and managed to do three things during my tenure: (1) rename it The Committee for the Preservation of Public Morale, (2), write our emails as Maoist propaganda, and (3) organize a massive waffle breakfast by getting people to bring in nine waffle irons (which caused a short, got us yelled at, and ensured this would only ever be a one-time deal) and make probably two hundred waffles for the fifty people who worked on our floor. I'm pretty sure it was this that ensured when they needed someone who wasn't very expensive to act as a staff participant in a consultant-driven test of a new email platform, they picked me. Around this time the economy took a spectacular nosedive, and suddenly people didn't really want to belong to professional associations anymore; they were too busy jumping out of high-rise windows or standing in front of trains (at the peak of the recession, there was one delay a week from people dispatching themselves this way on my train line into work), and one by one, every consultant on the project was fired, leaving only...me! As a reward for sticking it out, I was moved out of the call centre fully and officially (I got the news the same day I received a very negative performance assessment from one of my bosses -- who had provided negative recommendations whenever I sought out transfer to other departments -- it was like sweet nectar to me), and then spent about four years setting up discount codes and doing all sorts of other odd jobs of a tech-y nature for which I was ill-suited, until our social media guy, who had never exerted himself in the slightest (he'd gone off and gotten drunk while he was supposed to be covering our annual meeting) up and quit, and seizing on my boss's emotional vulnerability, I demanded the job. Despite a number of people being deeply concerned about my suitability for the job (those Maoist emails, remember?) I got it on a probationary basis and have been doing it for the last four years, and I like to think, have been doing a pretty damn good job of it. Certainly I think we do better than any other comparable organization, and I have the numbers to back it up. So finally I seem to be doing something I'm good at, which is working in the soul-destroying hell that is social media, without any promotion or substantive pay raise (though both have been dangled before me for the last four years), and enjoying my deteriorating mental health as I struggle to raise a family on a salary that barely keeps pace with inflation. Death will be sweet release!

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What's my day job? Currently, I'm employed as a rigger in coal mine mainteinence. 12 hr days, sweat, dirt, grease and heavy manual labour. But it pays reasonably well.

 

Yay me.

 

How I got here doesn't matter, it's my day job.

 

Edit: I should add. I'll have to keep working until I drop dead on the job, as I'll never able to afford retirement. Not keen on my current job (not the worst I've ever had, but not the best either), and my dream job would be something involving SCUBA diving and photography, pretty girls in bikinis not actually required (models are a PITA as a rule.) Fish are a lot less egotistical.

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After a long and varied career-pump attendant, fish delivery driver(!), trainee computer programmer, Coal mining management trainee, coal miner, motorbike salesman, electrical appliance salesman, coal miner (again), Registered Nurse, Care assistant,-

I now work nights as a warehouse operative in a distribution centre supplying clothing, sportswear, footwear, and sports goods to a chain of stores that now has branches worldwide. It's 4 nights on/4 nights off, so I get a long "weekend" every break- that's

the best thing about the job! The years spent working in mining and Nursing have taken their toll, leaving me with arthritic knees and hips, and chronic sacro-iliitis, which shows up as low back pain. I have 18 months to go till retirement, so I'm cruising to July

2020, at which point Mrs. Fifer54 and I will hitch up our trailer tent and take off into Southern Europe for extended periods.

 

Dream job? Working in a secondhand bookshop, especially one dealing in transport and aviation books . . .

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Started on British Rail at 16, worked as  fraud officer (Ticket Inspector but with more training and responsibility) for a few years. Always enjoyed going to court to give evidence, seeing the "professional" people hauled over the coals when they could afford to pay.

After that I became a Train driver, working in north London before moving out to East Anglia. Unfortunately several "things" happened and I ended up with severe mental health issues (PTSD and all its joyous off-shoots) and had to leave.

Then became a lorry driver, and now work as a supervisor for the same parcel delivery company. No more lorry driving, but sorting out all the mistakes that everyone else makes....

Dream job? did it. Train Driver.

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I left school at 15 and after a bunch of dead end jobs, joined the Royal Signals at the age of seventeen, and went off to see the world at the tax payers expense. I flew out to Singapore in a Britannia, saw the farewell flypast of three Beverleys and returned on a RAF VC10. While I was out there, I took part in a huge multinational land sea and air exercise in Oz sailing on Intrepid. It was reported as being the largest assembly of ships since the Inchon landings.

After leaving the army, I spent the next 30 years working in oil production for Shell , Mobil, BP and Aramco (in Saudi). I then took early retirement/redundancy, but as I was only 50 and my pension wasn't enough to live on, I took my class 1 HGV license and Hazchem certificate, and did a few years continental driving until 2004 when I jacked it all in , sold up and moved to France.

My dream job would have been to work with wood, to make furniture, but sadly, it wasn't to be. The nearest that I get to working with wood now, is when I get the chain saw out to cut logs for the log burner!

 

John.

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I left school without the proper results I needed for my original plans. After various dead-end jobs, I ended up in a civil engineering drawing office "because you can draw". I didn’t really enjoy the job, flunked out of the day release course as it didn’t seem to match with what I was actually doing in my job, and finally realised I really wanted to be a graphic designer.

 

My parents didn’t seem at all keen on helping me go to art college, and I ended up moving an entire county to go and live with someone I had fallen in love with. 

 

Time passes, and I went through various dead-end jobs - spot a pattern? - eventually setting up a small business trying to be a graphic designer. Eventually, I fell on my feet a found a full time job in the studio of a small printers. I learned a lot about printing, graphics, design, typography, and was completely overlooked for promotion. So, after 13 years I went out on my own again.

 

Time, as it does, passes. I couldn’t get the business going, had another full-time job as a designer and production manager for an advertising company. They went bust, made me redundant, and I tried the freelance/self-employed route again. After the 2008 crash, it really wasn’t working, and I thrashed around, doing all kinds of temporary and agency work, until a friend asked me if I would build a model railway coach for him.

 

Inside a year I was building full-time, doing things like this:

 

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43059263655_58e7decfd7_c.jpg

 

I'll never be a millionaire, but it keeps me occupied. In many ways, I suppose it is my dream job, but turning a hobby into a business is not all that easy.

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5 minutes ago, Heather Kay said:

I learned a lot about printing, graphics, design, typography, and was completely overlooked for promotion.

Ah, now you see, with regards to promotion, you have one basic flaw........you're a woman!! Just ask my wife.

Those locos are stunning. I love the pannier tank. I had the privilege (at the age of about 5 or 6) to travel on the Royal Scot up to Glasgow, hauled by 10001. I think that it was double headed with 10000. Happy days.

 

John.

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1 minute ago, Bullbasket said:

you have one basic flaw........you're a woman!

Yes, the thought had occurred. Of course, the dreaded age thing also hits at certain points. Double whammy.

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Always fascinated me that... You have the skills, you have the experience and the people that interview you are so dead keen on you, and then they come with that. sorry but you are just too old.... 

That happened on the last interview I went on late last year. Its already extremely hard to get a job down here and I actually asked the guy at the end, is it really that much of a big deal? If I'm not in the running, why interview me? Its not like I can say, okay, gimme a week and I'll lop off half a decade. 

You know what he said, its the vibe of the company... 

Like it just would not do to have a 49 year old man in the building? 

Maybe next time I should say, I'm 49, but I Identify as 25 :) 

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18 hours ago, Heather Kay said:

 

 

Inside a year I was building full-time, doing things like this:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I'll never be a millionaire, but it keeps me occupied. In many ways, I suppose it is my dream job, but turning a hobby into a business is not all that easy.

These are superb.

 

John

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18 hours ago, Heather Kay said:

 

 

 

 

 

I'll never be a millionaire, but it keeps me occupied. In many ways, I suppose it is my dream job, but turning a hobby into a business is not all that easy.

 

I agree with John Bullbasket that these locos are stunning. I grew up in a place called Wishaw which is about twenty miles south east of Glasgow and on a loop off the WCML. As a small child my father sometimes took me to the closed Wishaw South station on the actual WCML to watch the Royal Scot passing. There was great excitement if 10000/10001 or their Southern counterparts (10201/2/3) were heading the train and much disappointment if it was "only" a Coronation. Happy days!

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I’ve worked in the logistics industry virtually all my working life. Started off as a truck driver and worked my way up to senior management, currently based at a car factory in the Midlands. I also joined the British Army as a reservist in 1978 and then left in the mid 80s. Enlisted in the RAF Reserve in 2004 as a RAF Regiment Gunner. Served in Afghanistan before sacking it off a couple of years ago due to being an old knacker. 

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Software developer. 

Wrote my first code when I was ~12 and still eager for more at 45, never thought about doing something else except a short period of considering being a rock star, just like Simon Pegg's character in Hot Fuzz wanted to be Kermit the Frog

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I did an a apprenticeship at BAe Hatfield then spent a couple of years on the development side of the 146,left to go in the Navy,sadly that didnt work out so ended up back at Hatfield and also Leavesden but working for Rolls Royce on engine test beds,brilliant job but missed the aircraft side of things so back to BAe and into the flight shed.

Now at Cambridge on nights working on C130's and loving it.

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I'm a team leader in an NHS call centre. I've been working there for 2 and a half years, but only been a team leader for 18 months. Before that, I was a call handler, taking calls for South West London (from the North East, VOIP telephony is a wonderful thing).

Before even that, I worked in the family business for 28 years, making transformers for the electronics industry. Unfortunately, due to cashflow and other issues, that business went into liquidation, the designs and whatever stock and equipment that had any value were bought by another transformer company, along with my services as a consultant to translate our drawings into their drawings. That consultancy ended a year after the sale, so I had to go and find myself a "proper" job, hence the call centre.

So I've gone from a 13 person business winding transformers for such diverse things as PAT testing equipment, welding gear and guitar amplifiers, to managing a call centre that at peak has 60 people in it taking calls (particularly on a weekend or over the Christmas/New Year period.)    

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Retired.

 

Starting overhauling carburetters at a young age, then started a carb and tuning firm which I ran in partnership with another chap.

 

After a while 8-5 didn't suit me (too long) so I went into outdoor advertising for the next 20 odd years where I could work a 4-5 hour day and retired at 50 although I still help out at my wife's office cleaning firm. 

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19 hours ago, fatalbert said:

Now at Cambridge on nights working on C130's and loving it.

So you are Fat Albert and not the infinitely more intriguing and mysterious Fatal Bert: ☹️  Another illusion dies.

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4 minutes ago, Seahawk said:

So you are Fat Albert and not the infinitely more intriguing and mysterious Fatal Bert: ☹️  Another illusion dies.

Great Britain's answer to The Punisher!

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After a stint in the RAF as a Movs Controller (Movers to those in the know). In 2004 I took on a new & current career with Ambulance service. 

 

So instead of the logistics of loading C17's, C130's, VC10's & Tristars with freight and Passengers,  I now load A&E ambulances with poorly people.🖒

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1 hour ago, Seahawk said:

So you are Fat Albert and not the infinitely more intriguing and mysterious Fatal Bert: ☹️  Another illusion dies.

More of a Fat albert fixer 😀

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