Jump to content

What's your day-job?


Recommended Posts

I couldn't see an existing thread for this! 

What do you do for work?

Are you retired?

In education?

Do you enjoy work? 

What's your dream job? 

 

I'm a bespoke furniture maker... I make bespoke furniture, mostly one-off free standing pieces from European hardwoods with a few painted pieces too. Lots of hand work, traditional machines as well as a big 3 1/2 axis cnc. I thoroughly enjoy the work and the other makers in the workshop are a great bunch. Dream job? I already have it! 

 

Do you find modelling helps you with your work? 

  • Like 12
Link to post
Share on other sites

Currently im medically retired. In a past life i was in Law enforcement, Security, Construction, Truck Driving, and Warehousing. Modelling is my escape my coping mechanism for the rest of life in general. My dream job would’ve been Miltary career or Air Cargo Pilot.  

Edited by Corsairfoxfouruncle
  • Like 10
Link to post
Share on other sites

Retired handy craft teacher.  Retiring was the best job I ever applied for. 

 

Workshop got smaller and more detailed. The only time I pick "real" tools up is on the allotment. 

 

Do miss a band saw though 😊

 

Dick

  • Like 9
Link to post
Share on other sites

I run a Hobby Shop.

 

Fun job, but the pay sux in retail.

Unfortunately that means I'll probably never have enough money to retire but, what the heck.

  • Like 14
Link to post
Share on other sites

Fabricator/Welder or Plater/Welder depending on what part of the country you come from.

I left school ready with an apprenticeship lined up, a proper one. Been in the trade since then.

My work probably helps me with my modelling at times.

  • Like 9
Link to post
Share on other sites

Evening all 

I was retrenched last year and the job situation here is not good so my wife hired me as a stay at home dad/house husband/general slave 😁

Its actually quite cool and a lot less stress than my previous days being a Quality Control Manager for a construction company. My dream job was originally to be a flight engineer but my epilepsy put paid to that. Now? Maybe its time to give something back.....

  • Like 11
Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to be a computer analyst (no I don't know what one is either) but as I've always been a bit arty, I was about as suited to it as rabbit carving the Sunday roast. Modelling would only have been a help in my job if I made Voodoo dolls. That would have been quite useful.

 

I'm currently medically retired, much against my personal wish and desperate to go back (ssssshhhh! That's what I'm supposed to say, retired is absolutely fantastic!). I'm not in education, but to an open mind, every day is an education.

 

I'm currently doing my ideal job (which is none at all) but back when I was youthful, energetic and enthusiastic (that didn't seem to last long), I would liked to have been a furniture designer - really.

  • Like 15
Link to post
Share on other sites

I left school at 15 (hated it) and went straight down the docks. It was expanding and you could get a job anywhere. Office work at first, and the office block was teeming with mini-skirted crumpet. Did some warehousing work, then back into shipping. After 25 years of that and burn out, I did 12 years as a driving instructor. Followed that with 2 years in a video plant, a year delivering for Tesco, than back to the docks for 11 years as an internal postie. Now happily retired, and no intention of anything other than growing old disgracefully.

At school I initially fancied the RAF or the AAC. Then I wised up. I did fancy working for Ordnance Survey, but the changes to the school exam program spoiled that, so I got out PDQ. To be able to do it over, I would have gone into the Forestry Commission.

  • Like 10
Link to post
Share on other sites

After undertaking an apprenticeship at NGL/Westlands back at the beginning of the 90s i went and trained as a DT teacher and have been helping teenagers turn perfectly good timber into sawdust for the past 25 years.  Currently working in North Wiltshire but have taught in a variety of schools, state and private, day and boarding and now seriously looking forward to a well earned rest and retirement in about 9 years time... My photo shows me in the art gallery at a particularly well known school (there is a certain world cup next year that is all about a sport that was invented and named at the school) showing my wooden 1:24 mosquito i built for the staff exhibition back in about '04.

 

My modelling skills have worked both ways as I'm able to use them during lessons and also use the tools and facilities for my own benefit. Access to a laser cutter, 3d printer when it works,vinyl cutter and various casting processes is a real bonus. Just wish I had more time to work through my stash.....

 

Hutch

 

As for the ideal job - somewhere warm as an underwater archaeologist

Edited by Hutch
  • Like 11
Link to post
Share on other sites

.. had my 'dream' job, kind of I guess, or at least what some might imagine to be a 'dream' job - flight dispatch for a 'major' European airline, but the pay was not so good and the endless strikes (guess who I worked for ..) a bit soul-destroying, especially as I never could go on strike and had to clear the mess up every time!   Took redundancy in the end. But had some great experiences - like standing a matter of metres away from Concorde as she started her takeoff roll.....Nowadays I do a lot of commuting back and forth to France, still working in the mass movement/transport field..

  • Like 11
Link to post
Share on other sites

After 39 years on Military Aircraft (RAF and BAE Saudi) I fancied something different.

So three and a half years ago  I started as a Drayman, delivering and picking up booze and

other stuff that pubs sell. I've seen bits of England I'd never seen before, lots of fresh air &

healthy exercise, (The heaviest barrel we deliver is 22 gallons, that's almost 130 Kg) and I have

a different view through the windscreen nearly every day. Oh, early starts & up to ten hours usually.

The guys are a good team and we can have good laughs, you need a sense of humour in this job!

  • Like 18
Link to post
Share on other sites

Following University I had a job as a rep for a drugs company, then went into Customs & Excise for the next 38 years.

 

The conjunction of the two jobs meant I was able to infuriate my head of office (Assistant Collector, for those who know and that places me back in time, to!) when shortly after leaving the drugs company for Customs, I was introduced to the Chairman of the Board of Customs & Excise when he visited the office; I'm sure most have had the kind of inane small talk that followed, until he asked me : "What was it you did before you joined Customs?

 

To which I replied "I sold drugs".

 

In fairness, though there was a silence around us, the Chairman simply said in reply "Ah, poacher turned gamekeeper, then".

 

I have to say I loved my job in Customs.  I retired in 2013, and haven't missed it for a minute.

 

I suppose a dream job would have been bass player in a successful band. I have absolutely no musical talen or ability to play an instrument whatsoever, which means it was always a dream job. In that I dreamt about doing it.

  • Like 9
  • Haha 7
Link to post
Share on other sites

Mechanical engineer apprentice + 7 years for Marconi/BAE Systems.  Marine engineer for Shell Tankers. Various other engineering jobs including  power station/ nuclear power station maintenance, several years contracting & 13 years as a shift engineer in a plastic injection moulding factory (you can take it to the bank when I tell you flash on kit parts has nothing to do with tool age, wear or damage, you've no idea how annoying it is to see in print or hearing people who have no idea about injection moulding parroting something someone took a guess at to make themselves seem knowledgeable 40 or 50 years ago. Hendie has a thread on here which does a fine job of explaining injection moulding & debunking the flash myth. You can take a 50 year old tool & shoot it without any flash or a new too & shoot it with nothing but flash) & a couple of years at British Steel. Since 2001 I've been a truck driver & I'll probably retire in September. 

Edited by spaddad
  • Like 13
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm kinda semi-retired due to a long term illness, but to bring in a bit of money, I make guitar effect pedals. They're generally clones of out of production (and therefore hard to find and bloomin' expensive) pedals or modified classics. I also do a fair bit of bespoke stuff.

 

I'll never get rich doing it, but the money it does bring in is useful and it keeps my mind occupied. Most of the time it's enjoyable, though occasionally I'll have to deal with customers who want the moon on a stick, which would be fine, if they knew *which* moon they wanted! Mostly though, the customers are great, and I've made some good friends along the way.

 

With this job, many of the skills I picked up making models have helped with my work, with some tools swapping between the work and hobby benches in the garden workshop.

 

My first job, straight out of technical college, was as an electronics test technician. I worked for a company that made industrial chart recorders and process controllers. While it may not sound particularly glamorous, for the most part, the job itself was interesting.

 

After almost fifteen years, I left that job and became a laser engineer. While that probably *does* sound glamorous, it really wasn't! That said, the work was interesting, paid relatively well and I got on really well with one of the directors. The downside was that I'd often have to work very long days, as I was the one who tested and set up the lasers. If there was a deadline looming and time had been lost, I was the one who had to take up the slack and that meant working until 10 or 11 PM, usually on my own (which was incredibly dangerous and totally illegal) or through the weekend, also on my tod. 

 

After ten years or so, the director I got on with left suddenly and the job ended up being much more stressful. When I became ill, I did my best to carry on with the job as best I could, but doing a dangerous, stressful job when you're chronically fatigued isn't the best idea and after several close calls and a boss who decided that putting further pressure on me was the best answer, I walked out and never looked back.

 

I guess my dream job would have been as a pro musician, but I've always struggled to find like-minded people and my tastes are on the obscure side anyway, never the path to fame and fortune!

 

Cheers,

Mark.

Edited by lasermonkey
Added more info
  • Like 12
Link to post
Share on other sites

Left school at 17 and bounced around a few short term and contract jobs before going into the printing industry and doing my screen process printing qualifications at the old College of Building and Printing in Glasgow. 

By the time I was 30 I decided that there was more to life and did a degree in History and Political Studies at Stirling University. 

While I was at University I started working in printing and reprographics with Zeneca and stayed after I graduated. 

In the late 1990s Zeneca was broken up and the various divisions were sold off. I decided to leave and enrolled in Strathclyde University's Faculty of Education at Jordanhill in Glasgow, from where I qualified as a Secondary History teacher. 

I didn't go into teaching though, returning to the chemical industry as a Communications Manager with BP Projects at Grangemouth petrochemical complex. 

That lasted until a moratorium on new projects was imposed and, with a mortgage to pay and a young son to support, I became a supply teacher with Falkirk Council. After a few months I moved to Scotland's biggest Addition Support for Learning school and I've been there ever since. I changed my teaching registration to ASN in the process. 

I was only planning on staying in teaching until BP Projects picked up again but I've just passed 17 years in the job... 

Dream job? I can't say I ever really had one. Having entered the job market in June 1979 you took whatever was available and held on tight. 

 

John 

  • Like 9
Link to post
Share on other sites

Have worked in agriculture since I left school in the late 1970's, I am self employed and we have a small-holding , having downsized since the foot and mouth outbreak of the 2000's. 

I work part time on a school friends farm which helps with the bills, lots of variety , so I am never bored. Always wanted to join the RAF as a boy , being an  asthma sufferer ruled this out , but left me with a love for British military aircraft which has never left me.

 

Andrew

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

How do chaps.

 

Had a variety of jobs since I left school back in '88. Been a Junior sales assistant in menswear (really was like Are You Being Served) a care assistant, a barman and Pub Manager. Also did a few years working in night clubs as the day time ops manager. Worst job i had was as stock manager for a well known high street catalogue store. That particular job sent me off basket weaving for a few months. Have now worked in Social Care for the last 15 years. Started out as a senior carer then became a manager in various council care homes. Really enjoyed it but the aggro of trying to manage ever decreasing budgets became too much and i switched jobs just over 2 years ago. Now work as a Social Work Assistant. which is basically a Social Worker but without a degree. Job is very enjoyable, rather frustrating and can be quite stressful all at the same time. It helps that i work a great bunch of folks and have a good and supportive manager. No more weekends, bank holidays or shift work - the pay cut was worth it! 

 

Dream job? Always wanted to join the Police when I was younger but dodgy eyesight put paid to that :nerdy:

 

Regards,

 

Steve

  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites

Search and Rescue S-92 helicopter pilot (my photo is of me flying in Shetland a few years ago), previously RAF Sea King HAR3 and police MD902. Dream job: lucky enough to be doing it...

Jon

  • Like 16
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, spaddad said:

Mafia or a Cartel?

It was a German company so take your pick.

  • Haha 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

Before my stroke, I taught law and ethics to  nursing, midwifery and social work students, both pre and post registration.  Struggling to read and only being able to use a computer for a short while put paid to that. Before that I was a staff and then charge nurse in ENT. Originally I did a law degree and my articles, but was never going to be a good lawyer and so did a stint as a hospital porter at a cancer unit while getting over a broken marriage. 

  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites

Fully retired last year after 43 years as a lawyer.  I qualified as a solicitor in 1975 then spent three years in general legal practice followed by thirty two years as a prosecutor, in Scotland known as a Procurator Fiscal.  I eventually became District Procurator Fiscal (roughly = Chief Crown Prosecutor) for Dundee before taking a combination of voluntary redundancy and early retirement in 2010. After that I sat part-time as a Sheriff (roughly = County Court Judge) for eight years. Because I could be asked to sit in any court in Scotland there was a fair bit of travelling involved. I decided a while ago that I wasn't going to do another winter on the road and I also felt I was getting a bit old for the alarm clock going off at 5:30 a.m. so I hung up my wig for the last time at the end of October. Still trying to get out of the habit of logging on to the Scottish Courts website to check the latest appeal cases and other legal news!

 

Dream job? Back in 1969 when I was deciding on a career choice I explored the possibility of a pilot cadetship with BEA but shortsightedness put paid to that. In hindsight I don't really regret it. A couple of years ago I read a book called "Trust me, I'm the Pilot" by a guy who flew for BEA in the early 1970s and was a close friend of the First Officer on Papa India. It's appallingly badly written but the picture he paints (dysfunctional, strike-ridden, populated by ex-RAF captains with zero inter-personal skills) makes me think that my dream job could easily have become a nightmare. 

  • Like 11
Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been retired almost 4 years now. Before that I worked for 35 years in an oilsand extraction plant, in Plant Operations at the world's first oilsand mine. We ran the plant. We started up what needed starting, watched it while it ran and shut it down and safed it out for maintenance. We maintained plant safety for everyone there. We all received basic fire training and were the first response to any situation that might occur. There were numerous safety courses that were required and had to be kept up to date. We were required to know all procedures for everything in our plant, including H&V. Before that I worked 5.5 years in the largest greenhouse company in Eastern Canada. Prior to that one year in two different grocery stores and my first 18 years of life were on the family farm.

 

Now I just stay home and bother my wife and drive my two daughters to work and fetch them home when they're done.

 

Life is good. Retirement is GREAT! So much less B.S. to deal with.

 

 

Chris

  • Like 10
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...