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Jered

What's your day-job?

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My day (and night) job is as a flight attendant with British Airways , now in my 15th year. I fly on the 747/777/787 and A380. I also spent 7 years on the 767. Best part of my job is that I work with different people every flight and I've been to some amazing places (39 countries so far) over the years. 

My job has allowed me to stand on the top of Sydney Harbour bridge in the dark, visit Tiananmen  Square and The Alamo among others. On the modelling front it has also allowed me to run amok in the Hong Kong model shops.

 

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On 15 January 2019 at 4:38 PM, Radpoe Spitfire said:

After a stint in the RAF as a Movs Controller (Movers to those in the know). In 2004 I took on a new & current career with Ambulance service. 

 

So instead of the logistics of loading C17's, C130's, VC10's & Tristars with freight and Passengers,  I now load A&E ambulances with poorly people.🖒

Ahhh, movers, those chaps that are always bashing aircraft about.😀

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I was forced into early retirement back in 2015 due to ill health. At that point, I ended my career as a Catering Manager with a national contract catering company.

I began my career in 1971 as a commis Chef in a couple of local restaurants owned by Scottish and Newcastle Breweries. 

Then in 1972 I managed to get a job in a 5 star hotel in Lucerne, Switzerland and stayed there for 6 months until being attracted back to the UK by my old Head Chef who had moved to a new restaurant and offered me a job as a Chef de Partie in charge of the pastry and confectionery section. 

In 1975, after a year in that job, I applied for two jobs, one as a Sous (second) chef in a restaurant and the other as a Sous chef with a large international pharmaceutical company, tempted by the offer of straight shifts (07:30 to 16:00 Monday to Friday as opposed to my usual 16 hours a day shifts) with only Mondays as my day off. I applied for both as I had no experience of the industrial catering that was required for the pharmaceutical company which provided catering and hospitality for up to 900 employees each day, compared to the 80-100 that I was used to in the restaurants.

As it turned out, I was offered both jobs, so it was decision time. I elected to take the industrial catering job with the early finishing. I rang the restaurant owner to politely decline the other job and was surprised when a couple of days later, he rang back to ask that, as I would be finishing the industrial job at 16:00, would I consider working for him to cover the evening service and at weekends. What can I say, I was single, young and daft and used to long hours, so I accepted. The combined salaries were great and the taxman had a field day. I continued with that arrangement for about 18 months until I was asked to be Head Chef at the restaurant, which meant leaving the pharmaceutical company. 

After a year in the role, I was offered another position, this time back at the pharmaceutical site, but this time as Assistant Catering Manager. 

I stayed there in that position until 1994 when I was promoted to Catering Manager and continued in the role until 2008, but not without one or two difficulties, such as managing to avoid the closure of the restaurant facilities as a cost saving measure during two takeovers that the company went through. My department was then finally outsourced, together with Cleaning, Security and Site Services, to a large contract catering company and I ended up managing the Catering, Cleaning and Site Services departments.

There were three changes of catering companies in the intervening years until in 2008, the pharmaceutical announced a series of redundancies reducing the site workforce to 200 and they decided that the would be no catering facilities in future and so after nearly 33 years on the same site, I was put out to pasture. 

During my last three months on site working with the final catering company, I was involved with the winning of two contracts to provide the catering services to another chemical company and a large manufacturing company in the local area. This involved lots of hand holding to reassure the kitchen staff on the new sites and also to assess the catering managers capabilities and suitability for the role. I spent a couple of weeks on each site during the handover periods to get both sites up and running. 

When I was eventually made redundant, my wife and kids took our caravan up over the Scottish Borders for a couple of weeks and at the end of the first week, I received a phone call from my area manager at the catering company asking could I come to new chemical site at 09:00 on Monday morning. I explained that I was away on holiday and he said that in that case 09:30 would be fine! 

I did ask what it was about and I was told that they had had some "issues" with the catering manager and the head chef. 

I travelled down to the site and got there for 09:00 to find that the catering manager had blown a gasket with the amount of work that was required and had handed in her notice. Additionally, the head chef had been bullying one of the junior chefs and some of the kitchen staff and he had also told one of the customers to Swearing removed when he complained about something, so my company was told to remove him from site with immediate effect. 

During the time I was there during the handover period, I had build up a good working relationship with the site facilities manager and she had asked the company if I would be interested in taking over the job in a dual chef/manager role. So they offered me the job and I accepted it. 

I stayed there from 2008 until 2015 and spent my time working between three sites that the catering company had in the North East to cover holidays, sickness and a little bit of troubleshooting when things went pear shaped, like the time when one of our catering managers went missing for two weeks with no contact. When it came time to do the end of week banking, I checked with bookwork and the safe. The books said that there was £3,500 cash in hand, but the safe told a different story, £57.50. Apparently, he had "borrowed" the money with the full intention of putting it back, but the stress of job and his actions were just too much in the end and he went walkabout.

In 2015, I was diagnosed with a couple of heart problems and extremely high blood pressure, so that was the end of my catering career. 

I'd always thought that retirement would be great for my modelling activities, but I've managed to do next to nothing since I finished work. 

Our youngest son has just moved out and is living with his girlfriend down  in Norfolk, so my wife and I are in the middle of converting his room into a model room. Storage space has been arranged and all of my kits that have lived in the shed, so they are all now indoors and safe. The workbench will be going in next week and so normal should resume soon. 

Now I can enjoy my retirement!! 

 

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Reading through what some of you have had to endure makes me realize how lucky i have been so far!

 

I left school at 16 and walked into my working life 6 days later. Dream job was aircraft engineer in the RAF, but i have to say i enjoyed most of my time as an aircraft engineer at the local airport. After 10 years i was moved 20 miles up the road, and although i really did enjoy that, including the added excitement of low CAT aviation fire fighting, the draw of a return to my "home" became too much and just over 19 years later, i am a fire fighter at the local airport, where my career in aviation started nearly 31 years ago!

 

Sadly though, a few issues, mainly with my fitness to work through back, shoulder and more recently knee problems may see me looking for a way out sooner rather than later. Might manage another 5-10 years but surely there is something else out there?

Arabest,

Geoff.

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As I'm approaching the time when I can think about finally retiring I can look back on half my working life in the motor world including a short spell running my own specialist VW business (and never ran a Beetle!), and half in the aviation world working for first Air Atlantique and now AirTanker at Brize Norton.

 I always regretted not joining the RAF or the FAA when I was a teenager, so now I am doing my bit for the country as a civvie.

And as my role is a shift one my wife reckons I'm semi retired anyway as I only work half the year! The commute is a bit of a pain but job satisfaction and home make it worthwhile.

Modelling takes a much smaller part of my leisure time these days but like others, I'm promising myself it will get better when I retire.

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Left school in North Queensland at 15 and went to work as machinery operater in the local sawmill for 2 years.

Over the next few years I did few different things, soldier, carpet cleaner, husband, bouncer at a rugby league club,  father, security at a jewelry store, driveway attendent, ex-husband, and went through a period of moderate to severe paranoia along with a rather fascinating period of visual and auditory hallucinations (I managed to work my way through those problems alone, but it took a while. But if you do have mental health issues please see a professional).

Then in my early 30s I decided to get edumacated and went to university where I gained a BA with a double major in History and Archaeology.

With that I moved to East Asia and spent 13 years teaching English to kids, professionals, Ph.D candidates etc, eventually moving into teaching management. Became an ex-alcoholic (again by myself, don't believe in that nonsense of "Hi, I'm the Bear and I'm an alcoholic, its been such and such days since.....I choose to drink and I take responsability for that and any other thing I have done, ok off the soapbox now) got married again, became a father again, became a grandfather (daughter from my 1st marriage had adorables).

Eventually moved back to Oz and after trials and trubulations now work selling phone accessories and repairing smashed phones.

 

DennisTheBear

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34 years as a Senior Technical Illustrator and Technical Author, mainly with one contract company in Cheltenham and latterly with a much larger global company based in the midlands. Generally its been an interesting job (for the most part) producing illustrations and publications for a wide selection of equipment, concepts and processes, from the mundane everyday to the surreal. Overall I have been very lucky to have a stable and relatively rewarding career.

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Been an over-entitled Old Age Pensioner for just over a year and do a little bit of writing.

 

Left school at 17 to work in the Quality Control Lab of a leading Refractory Brick manufacturer which is now no more.   

 

Had been interested in an aircrew career in the RAF and attended OASC , did well in the testing for Navigator or Fighter/Air Traffic Controller but advised to ‘do something exciting’ and re-apply so joined the TA as a Sapper in the locally based 300 Troop of 131 (Independent Parachute) Squadron Royal Engineers (V) and did a few take-offs in Andover and Hercules both in the UK and on exercise in the Gulf.

 

But the need for a decent wage became pressing so joined the Police in the early 1970s and never had the time to reapply to the RAF , took a bit of damage to my legs during the 1984/85 Miners Strike which became more of a problem in later years by which time I was in the Admin/Communications side of things which did not present too many problems but eventually another on-duty injury led to a medical retirement and pension.

 

Took a degree course in Human Geography in my 50s and realized that I would never have had the discipline to do so as a school leaver and around the same time crossed paths with Neil Robinson which in turn led to the occasional bit of writing.

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On 1/13/2019 at 11:41 AM, MAD STEVE said:

Always fascinated me that... You have the skills, you have the experience and the people that interview you are so dead keen on you, and then they come with that. sorry but you are just too old.... 

That happened on the last interview I went on late last year. Its already extremely hard to get a job down here and I actually asked the guy at the end, is it really that much of a big deal? If I'm not in the running, why interview me? Its not like I can say, okay, gimme a week and I'll lop off half a decade. 

You know what he said, its the vibe of the company... 

Like it just would not do to have a 49 year old man in the building? 

Maybe next time I should say, I'm 49, but I Identify as 25 :) 

Sounds like a lucky escape to me, would you really like to work in a company with  "a vibe"? Imagine how many things would set you off in a company that had "a vibe" & sub 40year olds gobbing off mumbo jumbo all the time

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On 1/15/2019 at 4:22 PM, Seahawk said:

So you are Fat Albert and not the infinitely more intriguing and mysterious Fatal Bert: ☹️  Another illusion dies.

Sounds like its time for a petition to get Fatal to change his name, Fatal Bert would be, without doubt, the coolest name on the site, if not the whole internet. i'll start

 

spaddad

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3 hours ago, spaddad said:

Sounds like a lucky escape to me, would you really like to work in a company with  "a vibe"? Imagine how many things would set you off in a company that had "a vibe" & sub 40year olds gobbing off mumbo jumbo all the time

You are spot on Spaddad!

You get interviewed by someone half your age and you just do not understand half the crap that is coming out of their mouths. 

In the Quality Management job that I did, I takes time for you to build a reputation, and client engineers speak to each other and know of your reputation and want to use you, and if all goes well, you get letters of commendation at the end of a project. I have some from the biggest names in the industry in this country and I'm very proud of to have them, but when some spotty faced oik looks through them and says things like, we don't focus on individualism here, you feel like saying, ok, can I please talk to a grown up now :) 

 

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school lad.  in year 10

 

still having trouble with the factors of Pi and pithagarous not to mention triganmootory

 

(and spelling)

Edited by SA80A2AR

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I design fire surrounds and wood burning stoves, as well as all the advertising for the company (photography, websites etc etc). 

 

Previous job was designing coffins in all shapes sizes and printed picture designs. I describe that job as been like coffee. All my work ended up ground or roasted.

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Currently doing stock control mixed with engineering and babysitting the hard of thinking

spent 10 years as an industrial floor layer before that, which stopped due to recession

started working life as an apprentice engineer 

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My dream job was always to fly aeroplanes. I applied for the RAF as a pilot after finishing my degree only to be medically rejected and went down the civil route instead. After flying the A320 and A330 for Thomas Cook in the UK I moved to Dubai 7 years ago to work for Emirates on the A330. For the last four years I’ve been flying the A380. 

 

Chris

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On 1/21/2019 at 6:12 PM, airbus320 said:

My dream job was always to fly aeroplanes.  

Same here.

 

Some great stories on this thread. I always find it fascinating to read about people's lives.

 

Keep them coming.

Edited by noelh

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On 1/19/2019 at 8:56 AM, Coors54 said:

Ahhh, movers, those chaps that are always bashing aircraft about.😀

No not this one- to much of an aircraft preservation nut to do that. The worst thing I did was to play heads and tails with an empty aircraft pallet with a 10k Henley and come up tails.

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On 1/21/2019 at 8:05 PM, Radpoe Spitfire said:

No not this one- to much of an aircraft preservation nut to do that. The worst thing I did was to play heads and tails with an empty aircraft pallet with a 10k Henley and come up tails.

Very good.

Edited by noelh

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I too always wanted to fly, but the RAF was ruled out early on as I had to wear glasses. BA closed Hamble so that option was out. I left school at 16 and joined a bank. 3 (very boring) years later I left, took a pay cut, and joined a motorbike dealership. One year later I joined a temp agency doing whatever came up. The reason for that was I wanted to travel and didn't want multiple short term jobs on my CV. One of the temp jobs involved 3 months on a diamond mine on Guinea. Hamble reopened, but I was 6 months over the max age limit, so I paid my own way. PPL in 1985 but then no flying for 12 years as I couldn't afford the constant rental checks. 10 years at a haulage company in accounts, then I decided to give myself a kick up the backside. Sold the house and car and went to the USA to complete flight training. 7 years and 2,500 hours as an instructor, freight flying, bush flying in Guyana, 7 months in the Caribbean including St Barths (that was fun!) then ended up on Cape Cod flying for a small commuter airline. That went belly up, another commuter airline replaced it and I flew King Air 300s at 1,500 feet and 250 knots for 15 minutes a flight. Great fun!

 Then out of the blue I got a message on Linkdin asking if I'd be interested in instructing in the King Air. As a result of that I relocated to Abu Dhabi last May and that's where I am now. 10,000 hours of flight time later, finally earning a decent salary by not flying! 🤔

It's been a lot of fun though!

 

Ian

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On 1/23/2019 at 4:50 PM, limeypilot said:

10,000 hours of flight time later, finally earning a decent salary by not flying! 🤔

It's been a lot of fun though!

 

Ian

Didn't get so many hours but it was fun most of the time.

 

 

Edited by noelh

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On 1/22/2019 at 10:43 PM, noelh said:

. Many years later I got redemption. Another story.

 

Come on then, spill.

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Morning Chaps :bye:

Well I think all of you flying types just suck :) 

Its what I wanted to do from a very early age, but I didn't want to be a pilot, and I cant actually recall why I chose it, but I wanted to be a Flight Engineer. 

I did have a slight detour at one point, when I declared I wanted to be a tank driver, or even better still a tank gunner, until my dad pointed out tanks get blown up so maybe stick to the planes hey :) 

On the serious side, its actually quite a big downer in your life when you have wanted to do one thing all your young life, you go and try and sign up and you are told Sorry son, you cant do that. Not just you cant be a Flight Engineer, you cant join the RAF,period.

But anyway, here I am, 50 years old in a couple of weeks, and I still want to be Batman, an Astronaut and the dude in the Lamborghini factory that gets to drive the news cars from the plant to the storage yard :)  

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Hi, my name is Richard and I’ve been modelling for over 50 years. I was good at Art and I was encouraged to go to Art School and study Graphic Design. Unfortunately I couldn’t get a designing job and moved into industry. My Grandfather, my father (many of my family) worked for a company called Mettoy. It was a toy company making metal toys, clockwork train sets and cars (the cars became Corgi – now part of the Hornby Group), then rotationally moulded footballs and spacehoppers. I worked my way up to Production Planning Manager and really enjoyed the work.

Then my career changed, and I joined the railway as a Guard. Again I worked my way up to Train Driver and Driver Instructor. I loved both jobs, but my railway career became intolerable after a change to the franchise and I retired in 2013. I am now fully retired.

I guess my ideal job would be as an Historian of some sort (history fascinates me), but no-one employs over 60s any more, so I’ll continue to enjoy my retirement, modelling and bowls.

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1 hour ago, spaddad said:

Come on then, spill.

I'm afraid it must remain locked away under the forty year rule.🤫

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 'Ere Steve @MAD STEVE, your already batty enough to be Batman, nutty enough to be an astronut! You may stand a chance of being the valet with the new Lambo's, when you listen to the instructions and figure out yer Destra from your Sinistra! :whistle:

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