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WildeSau75

How to "rescue" sanded off panel lines?

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Hi guys,

 

I am building the 1/72 Academy Harvard IIb and used some Mr. Surfacer to close some seams which I then sanded. Unfortunately I sanded some panel lines away and now look for the best way to rebuild them.

 

Any tips?

 

Regards,

Michael

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I assume they must be the raised kind if you've sanded them off? When I used to build aircraft I simply used to apply some stretched sprue which I made the same diameter of the original line then glue it into place with liquid cement used sparingly..

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Are these engraved panel lines? If so, various plastic scribers are available, or, you could just use a knife/scalpel blade or a pin in a pin vise. The engraver I use for straight or slightly curved lines has a hook tip, so it actually removes a thin strand of plastic from the surface to create a "trench"; repeated applications will deepen it. I do also a pin in a pin vise when I'm using an engraving template because it's easier to scribe curved lines, like a round panel or such.

 

If they're raised lines, you can use a knife blade to score the surface. That scoring action will displace plastic to the side to form a ridge.

 

HTH

-- 

dnl

Edited by dnl42

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4 minutes ago, dnl42 said:

Are these engraved panel lines? If so, various plastic scribers are available, or, you could just use a knife/scalpel blade or a pin in a pin vise. The engraver I use for straight or slightly curved lines has a hook tip, so it actually removes a thin strand of plastic from the surface to create a "trench"; repeated applications will deepen it. I do also a pin in a pin vise when I'm using an engraving template because it's easier to scribe curved lines, like a round panel or such.

 

If they're raised lines, you can use a knife blade to score the surface. That scoring action will displace plastic to the side to form a ridge.

 

HTH

-- 

dnl

Thanks a lot - yes, I mean engraved panel lines. I tried with a knife but always slipped off on uneven areas. Which tool would you recommend for rather thin lines? Not sure I understand what a pin in a pin vise is....

 

Cheers,

Michael

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11 minutes ago, Steve Noble said:

I assume they must be the raised kind if you've sanded them off? When I used to build aircraft I simply used to apply some stretched sprue which I made the same diameter of the original line then glue it into place with liquid cement used sparingly..

Thanks mate - the are engraved. When sanding off the Mr. Surfacer part of them came off. dnl42's reply should do it I guess. Again, thanks.

 

Cheers,

Michael

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You need some sort of template or edge to guide the scriber. When using a metal scribing template, like this one, I tape the template to the model to prevent slipping. You could use any thin metal strip for this purpose if you're doing a straight line. In the US, we can get "Dymo" tape for making "embossed" labels. This tape will adhere quite nicely to the model and provides a good edge for this type of work.

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13 minutes ago, WildeSau75 said:

Thanks a lot - yes, I mean engraved panel lines. I tried with a knife but always slipped off on uneven areas. Which tool would you recommend for rather thin lines? Not sure I understand what a pin in a pin vise is....

 

Cheers,

Michael

Michael,

 

This is one form of pin vice

 

T130911.jpg

 

In some cases to get a straight line you need a guide to scribe against, either a flexible ruler or run thick tape (like electrical) along the line you need to rescribe.

 

You could also check youtube for rescibing technique videos.

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As for tools, you could use these tools from RB Productions. He's got some great tools on his site.

 

A pin in a pin vise is a pin of some sort chucked in a small hand-held drill handle, like this

pin-pinvise.jpg

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The Dymo tape suggestion in post 6 above is the method I always use, but stick the tape onto a similar length of Tamiya tape [or similar] as the Dymo tape, I have  found, often leaves a more sticky residue than does  the Tamiya tape.

This provides  a firm edge against which to scribe.

 

Placed carefully against the panel line, and using a scriber as described above, a clean panel line is [generally] the result.

 

Good luck !

Rog

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12 minutes ago, dnl42 said:

As for tools, you could use these tools from RB Productions. He's got some great tools on his site.

 

A pin in a pin vise is a pin of some sort chucked in a small hand-held drill handle, like this

pin-pinvise.jpg

thanks mate - will order one from there.

 

Cheers,

Michael

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A picture is worth a thousand words...…………..try this:

 

 

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3 minutes ago, roginoz said:

The Dymo tape suggestion in post 6 above is the method I always use, but stick the tape onto a similar length of Tamiya tape [or similar] as the Dymo tape, I have  found, often leaves a more sticky residue than does  the Tamiya tape.

This provides  a firm edge against which to scribe.

 

Placed carefully against the panel line, and using a scriber as described above, a clean panel line is [generally] the result.

 

Good luck !

Rog

Thanks mate - good hint. Have to see where I can get the tape from.

 

Cheers,

Michael

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1 minute ago, rayprit said:

A picture is worth a thousand words...…………..try this:

 

 

True! Thanks mate - appreciated. Although the colleagues did a good job in explaining it.

 

Cheers,

Michael

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20 minutes ago, Romeo Alpha Yankee said:

Michael,

 

This is one form of pin vice

 

T130911.jpg

 

In some cases to get a straight line you need a guide to scribe against, either a flexible ruler or run thick tape (like electrical) along the line you need to rescribe.

 

You could also check youtube for rescibing technique videos.

Ah - now I get it. Flexible ruler is good idea. Will order one of these tools and give it a try with a flexible ruler. If it's not working, I try to get hold of the Dymo tape

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I am again and again positively surprised how quick one gets very useful replies from friendly and helpful modelers all over the world. Indeed a great place for modelers BM is!

 

Thanks again to all of you - hope to be able to post some picks of my build with perfect panel lines in the near future.

 

Cheers,

Michael

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Ah, so for engraved lines I always use my Olfa P cutter. It actually removes a very thin sliver of plastic rather than just pushing the plastic aside like a needle in a pin vice does. Most useful tool for redoing panel lines I can think of..

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6 minutes ago, Steve Noble said:

Ah, so for engraved lines I always use my Olfa P cutter. It actually removes a very thin sliver of plastic rather than just pushing the plastic aside like a needle in a pin vice does. Most useful tool for redoing panel lines I can think of..

Thanks mate - will check it out.

 

Cheers,

Michael

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3 minutes ago, bhouse said:

For curved panel lines, a flexible curve (more properly called a lesbian curve) is a very useful guide.

Ha - a lesbian curve - there where other things coming to my mind ;-). This looks indeed useful. Thanks mate.

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