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Homebee

1/72 - Blackburn Buccaneer S.Mk.2 (new tool) by Airfix - 3D renders+schemes+sprues - release September 2019

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36 minutes ago, 71chally said:

Wing folding was regularly used right up to when Buccaneers were retired in 1994.

There was probably no need for it on the OCU, where aircraft were flown from a line and housed in hangars.  But there was certainly a need in RAFG, where the aircraft were put into a HAS.

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1 hour ago, 71chally said:

Wing folding was regularly used right up to when Buccaneers were retired in 1994.

Not on all aircraft

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You did say ,'towards the end of their career, wing fold wasn't an option', I read it as such, but even away from HAS's on the Lossie flightline for example the wings could be folded, always seemed to be an air show regular aswel.

.https://www.google.com/search?q=Bucc+line+up+at+Lossiemouth&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwicodW7r9DhAhW0WRUIHXtVAbkQ_AUIDygC&biw=1280&bih=657#imgrc=F51VQcK-2BVZdM:

 

I must admit that I haven't heard of some the jets having the wing fold capability removed, seems odd to do it to some aircraft and not embody it fleet. wide.

 

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The airframe Airfix scanned and researched XV361 at the Ulster Aviation Society still has full operational wing fold, direct from RAF service, it was in open and closed positions on different days of the teams visits in Nov 17 and Feb 18.

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8 hours ago, 71chally said:

You did say ,'towards the end of their career, wing fold wasn't an option', I read it as such, but even away from HAS's on the Lossie flightline for example the wings could be folded, always seemed to be an air show regular aswel.

.https://www.google.com/search?q=Bucc+line+up+at+Lossiemouth&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwicodW7r9DhAhW0WRUIHXtVAbkQ_AUIDygC&biw=1280&bih=657#imgrc=F51VQcK-2BVZdM:

 

I must admit that I haven't heard of some the jets having the wing fold capability removed, seems odd to do it to some aircraft and not embody it fleet. wide.

 

 

Yes, I can see what I wrote wasn't as clear as I intended it to be, what I meant was that some of the aircraft had the wing fold inhibited, IIRC (from a conversation we had a mighty long time ago), that it was something to with the wing-fold pins, apologies for the confusion, I did not mean to imply it was a generalised removal of the capability.

9 hours ago, Enzo Matrix said:

There was probably no need for it on the OCU, where aircraft were flown from a line and housed in hangars.  But there was certainly a need in RAFG, where the aircraft were put into a HAS.

 

Not my experience of being on an OCU, we liked to keep our aircraft as close to the fully operational standard as possible (albeit somewhat cleaner with less reds and greens), how else to you train the neophyte aircrew how to use the stuff?  I can see how the OCU may have had a higher proportion of these aircraft though.

 

8 hours ago, sniperUK said:

The airframe Airfix scanned and researched XV361 at the Ulster Aviation Society still has full operational wing fold, direct from RAF service, it was in open and closed positions on different days of the teams visits in Nov 17 and Feb 18.

 

Understandable that they would want to retain the most fully operational aircraft as they drew the fleet down.

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Source: https://www.airfix.com/uk-en/news/workbench/fresco-advances-to-test-shots-stage

 

Quote

Buccaneer wing fold update

 

1.jpg

The first test frame shots from the new Blackburn Buccaneer S Mk.2 tooling were first shown in the 97th edition of Workbench

 

One of the other new tooling projects announced at the beginning of the year was the Blackburn Buccaneer S Mk.2 in 1/72nd scale, one of the most capable strike aircraft to see British service and a kit many Workbench readers are very much looking forward to getting their hands on. In the 97th edition of our blog, we were pleased to bring you an exclusive update from this project, with the very first showing of the test frame components from the tooling, which clearly illustrated how our designer Matt had cleverly split the individual pieces of the kit to produce a highly accurate scale representation of this famous aircraft. Clearly, as this is a keenly anticipated new kit, the images came in for some close inspection and we were grateful for the many complimentary comments we received in the days following publication, along with a noticeable spike in pre-ordering activity for the kit. One or two modelling forums did carry comments from several modellers who were concerned that they could not see how the parts allowed the model to be constructed with its wings raised in carrier stowage configuration. Whilst these concerns were quickly allayed by fellow forum members, explaining how the frames included additional parts, we thought that we would clarify the situation now, so that Workbench readers can begin to consider in which wing configuration they intend to build their Buccaneer, before the kit is already lying on their workstation. Having discussed our intentions with Matt, he was only too happy to spend a little time away from his computer to produce a quick sample model build to illustrate the steps required. The following images have been provided by Matt and will hopefully be of interest to our readers – please remember that these parts are test frame components from the first plastic injection through the new mould and are only intended to illustrate the wing fold build option.

 

2.jpg

This series of build images have been produced in just a few minutes by Buccaneer designer Matt, who wanted to show how easy it will be to finish the model in the folded wing configuration. This first image shows where and how the lower wing section should be cut if this option is desired

 

3.jpg

Lower fuselage section interior assembly, with outer wings removed

 

4.jpg

Fuselage centre section assembly

 

5.jpg

Underside of the main fuselage assembly, showing both the wing fold and wheel bay detail

 

6.jpg

Another angle on the wheel bay detail

 

7.jpg

Outer wing assembly if the folded option is to be modelled

 

8.jpg

Outer wings attached to the centre fuselage assembly in the raised position – all parts are included in the kit

 

9.jpg

Viewed from the front, the Buccaneer featuring its raised outer wing option

 

Hopefully, the images featured above show how the raised wing option has been planned and how simple the modification procedure actually is. The full span of the lower wing has to be cut down the panel line as illustrated, if you intend to build your model in this raised wing configuration and new lower wing sections are included as an option within the kit itself. The new Buccaneer kit was developed in this way because the feeling amongst the team was that most modellers would be intending to build their model in flight configuration, providing an accurate scale representation of this iconic naval strike jet and in that case, Matt wanted to ensure the correct wing alignment was available to modellers. The appealing wing raised option is very much available and just requires a little prior planning and the use of some additional parts which are all included in the kit. Hopefully, this clarifies the situation and just leaves us all pondering the question, will we finish our Buccaneer with the wings up or down? We would like to thank Matt for breaking away from his busy day to provide these informative build pictures, which we hope you will find informative.

 

V.P.

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Very cool to have in box options of spread or folded.  🍻

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4 hours ago, Homebee said:

Hopefully, this clarifies the situation and just leaves us all pondering the question, will we finish our Buccaneer with the wings up or down?

That's assuming that people will only be building one.  I have plans for three in the Buccaneer STGB alone. :D 

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I’m stupidly excited about this!

 

Trevor

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The plastic seems to be of better quality than the previous one used on many new Airfix kits so, this is a plus (theoretically).

 

Apart from this, the old kit had issues with the air intakes, hopefully Airfix has resolve this????

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How do you tell the plastics better from pictures

 

This is a good watch by the way

 

 

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23 minutes ago, colin said:

How do you tell the plastics better from pictures

 

Hi Colin,

 

I'm simply guessing by the colour and praying to be true:pray: !!!

 

:smile:

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34 minutes ago, Shalako said:

The plastic seems to be of better quality than the previous one used on many new Airfix kits so, this is a plus (theoretically).

 

Apart from this, the old kit had issues with the air intakes, hopefully Airfix has resolve this????

That might just be a production thing, e.g. you need to use a softer plastic for mass production runs

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Looking impressive. That bomb bay roof looks like a Lego structure.

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4 hours ago, Paul J said:

Looking impressive. That bomb bay roof looks like a Lego structure.

Exactly why Airunfixed have skipped on a full ordnance load - so that one can show off the bomb bay roof in all its Lego glory!

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5 hours ago, colin said:

How do you tell the plastics better from pictures

 

This is a good watch by the way

 

 

Fantastic interview thanks for sharing! 10 feet then 20 feet, ruddy heck & like the technique for hugging the tops of the hills. What a superb bloke!

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One spread and one folded, I think Airfix might have just doubled their sales just by that one Workbench piece alone. This long awaited classic is looking very pleasing to the eye. 

 

Cheers.. Dave 

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6 hours ago, colin said:

This is a good watch by the way

 

We'd descend down to about ten feet, summat like that.

 

He's about as far from the Hollywood expectation of a fast jet pilot as it's possible to be.  But he's seen it. Done it.  Can't be bothered to wear the teeshirt.  :lol: 

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This could be that Ken Norman in flight.

Exactly as he says, banking over - hugging the hill tops. Awesome flying.

 

Really can't wait for this kit!

Martin

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The wheelbay detail looks wery impressive compared to older kits...

 

Cheers / André

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The two Xtradecal sheets are now available.  One of each is winging their way to me even as we speak. 

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Nice everything, however Airfix seem incapable of producing pilots who can do anything else but scratch their crotches.

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