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1/48 - DH.82a Tiger Moth by Airfix - released - DH.82b Queen Bee conv. set & CMK upgrade sets


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Loving it already I note the frame with the fuselage parts etc look as though it can be repalced with a different sprue to feature the Canadian version as these had very different cockpit openings to accommodate the enclosed cabin and the Menasco engine version with different cowls of the DHC 82C.   And several other differences.

 

And bang goes my plan to cut out  on 1/48th builds

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Looks to be a step up from the 1/72 kit and rectifies some of the deficiencies in its smaller brother, like the missing door-edge 'bumpers' and under-nose faired drain pipe.  Curiously, it adds the rear cockpit foot stirrup which was only on the early pre-War aircraft and deleted before WW2.  The too-long corrugated step plate on top of the nose cowling and missing covers on the insides of the wheels shows that Airfix spend too long looking at surviving aircraft (Shuttleworth) rather than original period photos......  

But overall, looks a good effort.

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10 hours ago, Homebee said:

.... the wing was repositioned to allow better front cockpit access to the aircraft

 

Still didn't stop me from managing, while distracted, to end up facing backwards when climbing into it on one occasion.....

 

A little surprised at the way the engine is done, but looks good and my stash will be increasing by at least two of these.

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This is the guy's second project and, judging by this, he's got a bright future ahead of him. The engine is a good compromise I think as many buyers will be happy with the detail provided. Those of a more 'enthusiastic' nature would probably go etched brass and resin replacement anyway. Not usually my thing but that's just changed ;)

As for the Smer kit? Well my one will end up on a truck disassembled after an unscheduled landing.

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On 1/7/2019 at 9:34 AM, AMB said:

see my Warpaint Tiger Moth book

@AMB, many thanks for pointing me in the direction of your Tiger Moth book.  I snagged a copy and was surprised and delighted to see drawings that both mention and show the forward rake of the landing gear on the DH-82C.  I'd been looking for any documentation on that for years.  This is the first time I'd seen it mentioned and drawn.  Thanks again!  :thumbsup:

 

And the rest of the book is quite good also.  :nodding:

Edited by uncletommy
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Release now expected in February 2020

Source: https://www.airfix.com/uk-en/news/workbench/sub-hunters-moths-and-classic-airfix-artwork

 

Quote

1/48th scale Tiger Moth schemes confirmed

 

As Airfix fans inspected the new model range at the beginning of 2019, they will have been delighted to see the inclusion of three completely new tooling projects, in the shape of the Buccaneer S.2 and MiG-17F in 1/72nd scale and the De Havilland Tiger Moth in the larger 1/48th scale. Although it has been a real pleasure to keep Workbench readers updated with the progress of these new models throughout the year, we did have to wait quite some time before we could bring you development details from the Tiger Moth project, which is why this information appears to have been coming thick and fast over the past few weeks. There is a very good reason for this, but that little modelling tale will have to be the subject of a forthcoming edition of the blog. Thankfully, it is now full steam ahead for the new Tiger Moth and we are delighted to be able to continue its triumphant advance towards eventual release by bringing you confirmation of the two scheme options which will be included with the first kit from this exciting new tooling.

 

Airfix and the De Havilland Tiger Moth have a long modelling association which dates all the way back to 1957, when the first 1/72 scale kit of this famous biplane was introduced to the range – back then, the kit would have been presented in the distinctive polythene bag with illustrated card header style of packaging. This classic kit was a regular in many an Airfix kit range over the years, benefiting from a series of cosmetic presentation changes, until it was superseded by new and much more detailed 1/72nd scale kit in 2014.

 

With this year’s announcement of a highly detailed new Tiger Moth kit in the slightly larger 1/48th scale, the famous aviation attributes of this magnificent aeroplane will be enjoyed by an even greater modelling audience, who will all come to appreciate that whilst this classic may not be as overtly appealing as either a Spitfire or a Mosquito, it is undoubtedly one of the most significant aircraft in the history of flight. Our new 1/48th scale de Havilland Tiger Moth is already attracting plenty of attention and possesses all the attributes to ensure it is regarded as a Classic Airfix kit, once this beautiful new model is unleaded on an expectant modelling world.

 

We are please to confirm the two scheme details which will be included with the initial release from this spectacular new tooling:

 

Scheme A - de Havilland DH82A Tiger Moth, K-2585/G-ANKT (formerly T6818), owned and operated by The Shuttleworth Collection, Old Warden Aerodrome, Bedfordshire, England, 2018 – finished in the colours of the Royal Air Force Central Flying School Aerobatic Team.

g_shuttleworth_collection_tiger_moth_k25

h_shuttleworth_collection_tiger_moth_k25

 

One of the most popular venues for historic aviation in the UK is the delightful grass aerodrome at Old Warden in Bedfordshire, home to the world famous Shuttleworth Collection. In addition to allowing visitors to inspect the historic hangars at the site and marvel at the aviation delights within, the Collection also arrange several Airshow events each year, which attract many thousands of people to this sleepy corner of rural Bedfordshire. Boasting a unique atmosphere and flying displays which seem to be performed much closer to the crowds than at other events, it is fair to say that once you have experienced an Old Warden show, no other Airshow comes close.

With an impressive number of historic aircraft based at Old Warden, the Collection could quite easily stage an Airshow with the serviceable aircraft they have in their hangars, one of which is a particularly flamboyantly presented de Havilland DH82a Tiger Moth, an aircraft which has been owned by the collection since 1966. This aircraft was built by Morris Motors at their Cowley factory in 1944, with the construction number 85087 and delivered to the Royal Air Force with the serial number T6818. Little is known of the aircraft’s military service history, however, like the thousands of other RAF Tiger Moths which trained a great many British and Commonwealth pilots during the 1930s and 40s, it will undoubtedly have been an extremely busy aeroplane.

 

j_shuttleworth_collection_tiger_moth_k25

Always one of the stars of any Shuttleworth Airshow, de Havilland Tiger Moth K-2585 wears the distinctive colours of a Royal Air Force Central Flying School Aerobatic Team aircraft from the 1930s

 

The aircraft’s post war history is much easier to trace, as it received the civilian registration G-ANKT and was acquired by the Shuttleworth Collection in 1966, along with two other Tiger Moth airframes. Over the next ten years or so, the aircraft was completely overhauled and re-covered by two former Old Warden engineering apprentices, using components taken from the other airframes owned by the collection. It made its first post restoration flight in 1977 and began a new career as an Airshow performer and training aircraft for pilots hoping to go on to fly the Collection’s aircraft.

 

Now a much loved feature of the many events held at Old Warden, the aircraft wears the colours of a Royal Air Force Central Flying School Aerobatic Team Tiger Moth from circa 1932/33 and the fictitious codes K-2585 – an aircraft wearing these markings would have represented the CFS at the annual Hendon Air Pageant. These massive events were an opportunity for the RAF to display both their flying skills and latest aircraft designs to crowd numbers which regularly approached half a million people and were a source of huge pride between individual squadrons. In these markings, Tiger Moth K-2585 (G-ANKT) is one of the most distinctive aircraft on the UK Airshow circuit and a real Shuttleworth favourite.

 

Scheme B - de Havilland DH82A Tiger Moth, K-4259/G-ANMO, Headcorn Aerodrome, Kent, England, 2018.

k_aero_legends_tiger_moth_k4259_scheme_d

l_aero_legends_tiger_moth_k4259_scheme_d

 

For the entire Airfix team and the lead designer on this new Tiger Moth kit in particular, this second scheme option to be included with the first release will have real poignancy. As this fantastic new kit was progressing through the development stages, they were given the opportunity to visit Headcorn Aerodrome and have unprecedented access to the actual aircraft which is featured with this scheme option.

 

This particular Tiger Moth was built in 1934 and allocated to the Royal Air Force as K4259 in November of the same year. Officially taken on charge on 12th January 1935, it was initially issued to No.1 Aircraft Storage Unit, before being allocated to No.24 Squadron and a service career training future Royal Air Force pilots, as the nation prepared for war. During this extremely active period, it passed through a succession of training units, including lengthy periods with both Nos 10 and 22 Elementary Flying Training Schools. It ended its impressive service career with No.12 Maintenance Unit, from where it was sold to a private owner in December 1953 and was allocated the civilian registration G-ANMO the following month.

 

In 1955, the aircraft was purchased by an owner in France and it would be a further 15 years before it returned to the UK and regained its original G-ANMO registration. On 30th July 1972, this Tiger Moth was involved in a non-fatal mid-air collision with a Stampe biplane at an Airshow at Weston-super-Mare, an incident which would result in the aircraft undergoing a major rebuild and many years in the hangar. Making its first post restoration flight in early 1987, it has remained in airworthy condition since that date and passed through the hands of several different owners.

 

m_aero_legends_tiger_moth_k4259_scheme_d

This magnificent aircraft allows members of the public to experience the thrill of flight and provided essential data during the development of the new Airfix kit representation of the aircraft

 

Perhaps the most significant date in the post war history of this aircraft occurred during 2014, when K-4259 was acquired by Aero Legends, a company which offers experience flights in several historic aircraft types from their facilities at Headcorn Aerodrome, North Weald Airfield and Sywell Aerodrome. Allowing people the opportunity to experience what it was like for young airmen during WWII who were progressing through their elementary flying training, the company can also offer flights in a two seat Spitfire, if you want the ultimate wartime RAF flying experience.

 

The de Havilland Tiger Moth was without doubt one of the most important aircraft of the 20th century and astonishingly, is still performing the same flying training role for which it was designed 88 years ago, to this day. Current Airshow display pilots who harbour a desire to progress to flying powerful Warbirds will need to gain plenty of ‘taildragger’ experience before that dream could become a reality and the most suitable aircraft in which to gain this experience is still a de Havilland Tiger Moth, designed during the 1930s. Just as it did in during the dark days of the Second World War, the Tiger Moth is still the most effective initial route into the cockpit of a Spitfire or Hurricane.

 

Our magnificent new 1/48th scale de Havilland Tiger Moth kit is now very much back on track, even though its release date has now been confirmed as February 2020. This extra time will allow everyone to pre-order their example of a model which we know will be incredibly popular and possibly quite difficult to obtain following its release.

 

V.P.

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⏲️   even a longer wait now... on the bright side it will , in that case, be out for my next birthday so then I have an excuse to buy a kit or more...

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Criminy, they're killing me with these delays.

 

I suppose we're getting a modern version of the aircraft rather than as it would have appeared in its working lifetime.

Edited by dnl42
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4 hours ago, bradleygolding said:

Still no Australian build option though.

 

Steve

I'm sure they will have  in service with foreign operators releases after this initial one.

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12 hours ago, tonyp said:

I'm sure they will have  in service with foreign operators releases after this initial one.

To do an Australian one they actually need slightly different wings and a different Air filter.

 

Steve

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rhere are a number of other different, if fairly minor) features on the Australian-built Tigers, and these were discussed at some length in an earlier thread when the 1/72 kit came out.  Thanks to Ed Russell.  Nav lights is one, but I don't recall the others immediately, nor a wing difference.  Memory isn't what it was, I'm afraid.

Edited by Graham Boak
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I'm happy that the Central Flying School Aerobatic Display Team scheme is one of the decal options, though disappointed that the model will not represent the aircraft flown by the CFS at RAF Wittering, 1932-33. The front cockpit was faired over, making it a single seater. This is the old Airfix 1/72 kit in that configuration.

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23 hours ago, Stephen said:

Airfix can't get anything out on schedule.

 

Or perhaps more accurately, Airfix aren't very good at project forecasting.  Then again, they're hardly alone in blowing past self-declared release dates...

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Don't be nervous with the Airfix proposed markings, there'll be for sure and very soon a lot of other decals to find and realize your favourite Tiger Moth scheme.

By example, go Xtradecal:

 

- ref. X48205 - de Havilland DH.82a Tiger Moth Pt1 - FAA, RAAF, RNZAF & SAAF

https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/X48205

 

  • T7189/L1A of 780 Naval Air Squadron 1943.
  • A17-56/56 of No.6 Elementary Flying Training School, Royal Australian Air Force, based at RAAF Station Mallala, South Australia, 1940
  • A17-347/’347’ of No.10 Elementary Flying Training School, Royal Australian Air Force, based at RAAF Temora, NSW Australia, 1940
  • NZ882 ’AI’ of No.3 Elementary Flying Training School, Royal New Zealand Air Force based at RNZAF Station Harewood, New Zealand, 1940
  • ‘524’ of No.4 Air School, South African Air Force, based at Benoni, South Africa, June, 1945

 

X48205-1.jpg 

 

- ref. X48206 - de Havilland DH.82a Tiger Moth Pt2 -  Civil Schemes

https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/X48206

 

  • G-ADVZ operated by Scottish Aviation/No.12 ERFTS, Prestwick, Scotland, 1935.
  • G-ANOD based at Ipswich Airport, UK, 24 July, 1954
  • ZK-BFH of Croydon Aircraft Works, Mandeville Airfield, South Island, New Zealand, 2006.
  • G-APMX owned by K. B. Palmer, Popham, Hampshire, UK, 10 August, 1980

 

X48206-1.jpg

 

- ref. X48207 - de Havilland DH.82a Tiger Moth Pt3 - Overseas Operators 

https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/X48207

 

  • DE-832/9 of French Pilots School, Armée de l'Air, Cognac, Charente, France 1948.
  • 53 of SK.11, Flygvapnet, (Swedish Air Force) 1932.
  • 107 of Força Aérea Portuguesa, (Portugeuse Air Force) 1937-40.
  • 2-I-2 of Marinha do Brasil, Brazil, 1935.
  • 002/V of Koninklijke Marine, based at Valkenburg en De Kooy, Netherlands, late-1950s.
  • T-2 of Belgisch Militaire Vliegwezen/Aviation Militaire Belge, Goetsenhoven, Belgium, 1950s.
  • DE745/Dorothy of 353rd Fighter Group, United States Army Air Force, based at Goxhill, North Lincolnshire, UK, Summer, 1943

 

X48207-1.jpg

 

V.P.

 

 

Edited by Homebee
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On 13/10/2019 at 11:55, Ratch said:

I'm happy that the Central Flying School Aerobatic Display Team scheme is one of the decal options, though disappointed that the model will not represent the aircraft flown by the CFS at RAF Wittering, 1932-33. The front cockpit was faired over, making it a single seater. This is the old Airfix 1/72 kit in that configuration.

 

The original CFS aircraft were DH82s (some of the very first delivered to the RAF), not the mass-produced DH82a depicted by the Airfix kit.  There are a number of other differences besides the covered

 forward cockpit, which would require conversion work.

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Indeed. I used to occasionally fly G-MOTH, which in the 80s was rebuilt into the only airworthy Tiger Moth I am aware of in original DH.82, rather than DH.82a configuration. No plywood rear decking, just stringers. No anti-spin strakes. Lovely aeroplane. 

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