Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Bandsaw Steve

RMS Carpathia, Scratchbuild, 1/500 Scale

Recommended Posts

2 minutes ago, Chewbacca said:

Seriously impressed with the speed of this.  That much work would have taken me at least a month.  Interesting choice of scale.  Was there a rationale behind that?

 

I seem to recall my Grandmother saying that her Aunt and Uncle perished in Titanic but that her cousin survived so she must have been rescued by Carpathia.  In their honour I shall be following this with interest.

Hi Chewie!

 

Thanks for that. I'm surprising myself with how fast this is going. I started work on this one week ago and now - just seven day's in - I have a model that I think is recognisable as the ship she's supposed to be. This model is never going to be 'museum quality' she's always going to be the result of an expedited project, but so far I am really happy with her all the same.

 

Thanks for writing in about your family connections - I have been surprised at how many personal connections this has touched, yours is the third mention on this thread already. It underscores just what an impact this terrible event had on so many families.

 

Finally - 1:500 scale...

 

No real reason. The original plans in John Bowen's book are 1/1200 - which is far too small for my liking. When I doubled them to 1/600 the model still looked small. I nearly went with 1/600 because that's Airfix's old maritime scale but decided I wanted a bigger model. I went to 1/500 because that was about the limit of enlargement that it looked like the plans would stand. Furthermore I am a big fan of the metric system and typically use google to convert all imperial measurements into metrics - not that makes much difference in this case as I'm really just working directly off the plans.

 

Thanks for your interest.

 

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some really nice details coming out on this build and the tutorials are so interesting the notebook is getting well used :book:

 

Thanks Steve 

 

beefy 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Beefy,

 

I think the main lesson is that with a handful of tools - including some sharp chisels - and some high quality wood, carving is a highly practical way of creating all sorts of things.

 

Often I’m greatly surprised by the complex, expensive and slow means by which people fabricate things that could be quite readily carved. I think people often think it’s trickier than it is.

 

Pleased to have you following along mate! 👍

 

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No wheels and no wings are just two of the appeals of this project!

The way things are going, the next project might be exactly the same.😀

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

fantastic work Steve.  Impressive skills on display.

For some reason I had imagined the ship to be much, much larger so the scale shot was useful.

 

 

This really brightened up my day !     :rofl2:

 

11 hours ago, Bandsaw Steve said:

Don't sand off too much or you will be left with this...

 

zYazBXP.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very impressive work Steve, you make it look so easy.

I do not have the weaponry to handle wood like you do but much can be taken from this that will help me build my own liner, the Fushimi Maru, in plastic. I'm trying to decide on a scale and edging towards 1/350 on the basis that some 'after market' stuff like boats, funnels, etc will be available.

Carry on with the great work, will be interesting to see what your next build will be now that you've the 'bit in your teeth'

 

Stuart

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Courageous,

 

FWIW I would advise 1/350 if possible. As you point out there’s a lot of detailed aftermarket fittings in that scale that could really help the project along. 

 

I would have have done this in 1/350 if the enlargement of the drawings had permitted but even at 1/500 the copies were starting to look a bit rough.

 

 Thanks for the kind words on the project to date. 

 

Steve

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I cannot but admire the work of a craftsman.

Working with chisels , a bandsaw, files and sandpaper to create a piece if history, in my eyes, and all credit to you.

 

I look forward to seeing this develop into the tribute it will become.

 

Ian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ooh.  looks nice

Edited by SA80A2AR

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Mancunian airman said:

I cannot but admire the work of a craftsman.

Working with chisels , a bandsaw, files and sandpaper to create a piece if history, in my eyes, and all credit to you.

 

I look forward to seeing this develop into the tribute it will become.

 

Ian

 Couldn't agree more with Ian.

Astonishing progress - Steve - I'm in awe

Rob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Steve, a wood rasp is a butchers instrument no matter what you touch with it. Look at the canopies on my tram models, they are finished using a drum sander on a mini drill and it can do outside or inside curves down to abt 10mm radius. Metal sanding balls are also available.

 

A nice model, when is the launching party?

 

Regards, Barry

 

ps... still can't get flickr to perform, any ideas pls???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Barry Marchant said:

ps... still can't get flickr to perform, any ideas pls???

 

This may help

 

Kev

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Flickr should be improving as Yahoo is elbowed out and Smugmug introduce their changes - ie the pending new log in. Note though, the FREE account limit of 1000 images kicks in very shortly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 08/01/2019 at 19:07, Barry Marchant said:

Hi Steve, a wood rasp is a butchers instrument no matter what you touch with it. Look at the canopies on my tram models, they are finished using a drum sander on a mini drill and it can do outside or inside curves down to abt 10mm radius. Metal sanding balls are also available.

 

Actually when considering my Britmodeller name I nearly went with ‘Wood Butcher’ so I would have to agree with you on the point regarding butchery!😁

 

Will be getting a cylindrical sanding attachment   and possibly a sanding ball for my Dremmell on the strength of your recommendation. 👍

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's really when you post the image with the pen and sunglasses that shows the scale of this little beauty.

Inspiring work. I scratch built a few local steamers in my younger days 30-40 years ago :) 

No true scale, but they were all about 8-10 cm size from full scale size of 30-50 meters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mega! Really nice work, it might even inspire me to do a "waterline" model of a block ship, just a couple of masts and a funnel poking out of the oggin!

 

Granto

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Valenstitch said:

it might even inspire me to do a "waterline" model of a block ship, just a couple of masts and a funnel poking out of the oggin!

 

Now that Sir is a truely great idea! 👍

 

Sorry about the lack of progress on this project. Work sent me to the other side of Australia this week so nothing likely to be reported until this weekend. Part of the reason I put the Avro on hold was because it looks like I’m going to be doing a lot of travel over the next few months so this thread is likely to be intermittent. 

 

Thanks for for all the interest and comments everyone it really helps the motivation to get back to this as soon as possible. ✌️

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 09/01/2019 at 21:55, Bandsaw Steve said:

Actually when considering my Britmodeller name I nearly went with ‘Wood Butcher’ so I would have to agree with you on the point regarding butchery!😁

 

Will be getting a cylindrical sanding attachment   and possibly a sanding ball for my Dremmell on the strength of your recommendation. 👍

 

Thats good, but watch the power of the dremel. My mini drills are much less powerful and I prefer them 2 your Dad's dremel!!!!  Too much pressure and the dremel takes over too quickly!

Good carving,

Barry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Noted!

 

It’s not often that I have too much power - my wife makes sure of that! 🤪

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, Bandsaw Steve said:

Noted!

 

It’s not often that I have too much power - my wife makes sure of that! 🤪

Lucky Man!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Masts

 

Righto, enough chit-chat.  Let's give this thing some masts!  They will be built from fine brass tube with some necessary details soldered on.

 

I'm fairly new to this soldering lark and there's a great deal that I have to learn and a lot of materials and tools that I haven't tried yet. So far however I can say that soldering is great fun, extremely useful and is 'an art well worth your learning' as they say.  Expect to see quite a bit more of it in future as I enthusiastically hunt down new tools, techniques and materials.  I've already got a soldering torch - as opposed to an iron - and I've been fiddling around with it an effort to burn my fingers.

 

Anyhow , here's what I've done with the masts for this project.  Just using the soldering iron, not the torch, for this particular phase.

 

aUOwAKI.jpg

 

The second mast has a sort of 'doubled up' length in the middle of it. So I've crudely represented this by soldering a second bit on at the relevant position. Remember this is going to be a quick build so let's not get too hung-up about the big blobby bits of solder left over.

 

sVNGsuN.jpg

 

The second and third masts both also supported cargo handling davits so they had to be at least crudely represented. In this case they are the two sticky-out bits that make the mast look like there's a bipod sticking out one side.

 

GOV0xp1.jpg

 

Each mast has a 5 degree rake on it - dead parallel to the rake on the funnel.

 

zpMNrNl.jpg

 

Getting the masts to sit in exactly the correct position at exactly the right angle can be done one of two different ways

 

AYZF9ED.jpg

 

Option one - Drill a series of holes. This is what sensible people with no imagination do...

 

Option two - Smash the ship's hull in half... Guess which one I did!...

 

Y4mAtY5.jpg

 

Bang it with a big hammer !!!! 🔨

 

4pZtBbn.jpg

 

Yep, why have one hull, when you can have two?

Mark up the exact positions of where the masts must sit...

 

x84gPAc.jpg

 

measure on the 5 degree rake...

 

IKThZ98.jpg

 

and now you can plot each mast's position and angle directly onto the ship's exact centreline. So it's not actually a completely stupid way to do this job, besides there are another couple of little tasks that I can only do with the hull split. More of that in the next post...

 

kRZuxwK.jpg

 

After using a fine saw to cut slots for each mast on the meeting faces of the hull (sorry no photos) we can place each mast directly into it's own, very accurately determined position. 

 

rUhWPH2.jpg

 

Here is the project right now - entirely dry fitted. The only glue in use at this point is the spray-on stuff that is holding the paper plans on the wood.  Except for the soldering, nothing at all is stuck together at the moment

 

eo1J3NO.jpg

 

Tomorrow we shall get some glue out I think...

 

Best Regards,

Bandsaw Steve

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Bandsaw Steve said:

Yep, why have one hull, when you can have two?

 

Yeah double the fun :penguin:

 

 

23 minutes ago, Bandsaw Steve said:

Here is the project right now

 

You can see the grace and beauty of the real thing starting to shine through :thumbsup:

Not bad for someone who claims to work for  Bodge It & Leggit !!

 

Kev

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...