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bobsyouruncle

A little metal and woodwork, 1918 Bristol F2B Fighter.

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I had a very small window of spare time this week, so fancied doing something that didn't require a lot of thinking about. 

I love getting up close to some of the materials on the older aircraft and liked the look of this metal edging on this wooden prop tip.

It's only a small one, this, oils on oil paper 10" x 9", but a lot of fun. Apologies for the reflections on the surface in this photo.

I'll just hold back a very short while before saying what aircraft the prop belongs too (just in case anyone likes a challenge, purely for fun).

Ngb2qD.jpg

 

Cheers, Bob.

Edited by bobsyouruncle
Add aircraft type to title

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That is a very fine piece of work. I'd be proud to have that on my wall.

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Beautiful work, what are those three cutouts at the tip?

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I thought it was a photograph until I looked closely and saw the canvas. Astounding.

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Thanks for the kind words, Gents.

The prop was on the 1918 Bristol F2B Fighter of the Shuttleworth collection. 

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what are those three cutouts at the tip?

I don't know what these are for (yet) Nils, but I do like the small details like that which you only see when close-up.

Cheers, Bob.

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Yes me too.

I can’t stop admiring your metal look. Extremely well done paint job 👍

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what are those three cutouts at the tip?

Nils, I think I have the answer (according to 'the aeronautics guide'). It says that metal edging/tipping, is added to prevent damage to the wooden propeller from debris, particularly whilst in the vicinity of the ground.

It adds that condensation forms between this and the wood, so drainage holes are added near the tip, to allow water to escape/be thrown out by centrifugal force? 

 

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what's you secret of your nmf

Hi Colin, thanks. I don't have any secret. I think it's probably one step easier than modelling really.

In modelling, I guess you observe and then try to replicate effects using various methods and materials, learning from others and experimentation/pioneering.

With oil paint, it's still observing but replicating using just the different colours where applicable. No other medium required.

Cheers Bob.

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