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This is a first for me, a scratchbuild, so let me tell you the reason why.

The intention is to build a Japanese Steamer, the Fushimi Maru and that will be a scratchbuild. So before I start on that build, I thought I better 'cut my teeth' on something less demanding, like a tug:

 normal___57_28129~0.JPG

to learn some new skills. The deck plan, side profile and the build process of the subject was acquired via @ShipbuilderMN but this is in wood, I don't do wood, so plastic is going to be used. A quick search of 'tug line drawing' revealed these free plans:

 

planche-n-1-la-coque.jpg

Although these are not of SA Everard, they are of a very similar tug and good enough for this exercise of boat building. The plans were scaled so as I can use a standard size sheet of  plasticard and copies printed.

 

20181024-124947.jpg

It's going to be waterline, so we have a 'waterline' base cut to shape, marked with the frame locations and a spine fitted.

 

20181025-125631.jpg

A few frames fitted.

 

Comments welcome

 

Stuart

 

 

 

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Cheers guys, early days.

Most of this build will most probably take place at work during my lunch hour, so no fast build here. Hopefully @blackmme will be helping me out with photos when I need the detail.

 

Stuart

Edited by Courageous

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Nice idea Stuart, and as you say a good one to cut your teeth on for a bigger scratch build.

 

One thing I would warn with plastic in a build like this - make sure the major surfaces are made from good and solid sheet. Years ago I attempted to scratch build a Russian Krupny class destroyer in 1/700. I have some very good plans, and I constructed the hull from sheet and frames similar to the way you show but after a time it had warped. Suspect I had not built it beefy enough and also I made some of the surfaces thicker by laminating the plastic. I scrapped it in the end. If I ever re-attempt that it will be at least 1/350 and of much more sturdy card!

 

This looks good and with those frames you should be OK, but something to watch for.

 

What scale is this one?

 

Terry

Edited by Terry1954

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:hmmm: This is going to be interesting ….

 

2 hours ago, Terry1954 said:

but after a time it had warped.

 

I suspect this may also be a sign of glue sniffing

Be careful when assembling any structures that form a box. Glues used in plastic work give off fumes and if contained within an airtight compartment will soften the plastic. In the above structure I would leave a good size hole in the bottom

 

HTH

 

Kev

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@Terry1954Cheers, thanks for the warning. Scale is 1/100.

 

After Terry's warning about plastic thickness, I thought I'd check the stuff I'm using, 1mm (0.040" in old money)

Update:

 

But, it was after all this work that I realised that I was a bit of a Homer and made a rather large boo-boo. I had used the line drawings of Dundram Bay literally, and didn't adjust my measures for Everard, DOH!:suicide:The length was good, the side profile was good but the beam was way out, 10mm to be exact. I was contemplating ditching what I'd done but I said 'No', and clipped both ends of the frame and then the base to marry-up with Everard. :thumbsup:

20181026-111009.jpg
After the rework, all frames in albeit a bit scruffy but this will all be covered up and shouldn't be a problem.

20181026-135303.jpg

Deck on.

20181026-135412.jpg

Side view.

20181026-135443.jpg

Paper deck layout laid on top.

 

Next up will be the hull and bulwarks but I'll have to go to thinner card, which I don't have, before I tackle this.

 

Stuart

 

 

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3 minutes ago, longshanks said:

Be careful when assembling any structures that form a box. Glues used in plastic work give off fumes and if contained within an airtight compartment will soften the plastic. In the above structure I would leave a good size hole in the bottom

 

I was planning on putting this onto a sea base, I'll have to give it some thought, thanks.

 

Stuart

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4 hours ago, longshanks said:

:hmmm: This is going to be interesting ….

 

 

I suspect this may also be a sign of glue sniffing

Be careful when assembling any structures that form a box. Glues used in plastic work give off fumes and if contained within an airtight compartment will soften the plastic. In the above structure I would leave a good size hole in the bottom

 

HTH

 

Kev

 

Thanks Kev, I didn't know that, very useful information! Maybe my desire to get airtight seals on my models isn't a good idea after all.

 

I assume then that the fumes don't go inert over time... Or do they do the damage before they go inert?

 

 

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4 hours ago, longshanks said:

Be careful when assembling any structures that form a box. Glues used in plastic work give off fumes and if contained within an airtight compartment will soften the plastic. In the above structure I would leave a good size hole in the bottom

I have an idea :idea:. What if I put holes in all the internal frames, thus making it one sealed box, then vent the said box up the 'chimney'. 

 

Stuart

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If the fumes don't go inert then - add some black ink to the glue and you might have natural smoke from the 'chimney' for years to come.   😄

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15 hours ago, Courageous said:

20181026-135412.jpg

That side view looks really good!

 

Terry

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When making a deck like this I would recommend using 2 sheets of 20thou rather than 1 sheet of 40thou as it produces a stronger deck and reduces the chance of the hull having the bow and stern distorting downwards.

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9 hours ago, Terry1954 said:

That side view looks really good!

Cheers Terry.

8 hours ago, robgizlu said:

Ambitious and intriguing - is there no stopping this man :worthy:

Looking great;)

I do my best. Taking advantage of a FULL MOJO tank.

6 hours ago, Niall said:

When making a deck like this I would recommend using 2 sheets of 20thou rather than 1 sheet of 40thou as it produces a stronger deck and reduces the chance of the hull having the bow and stern distorting downwards.

Duly Noted. As I said, this is a first and a bit of learning curve. In my defense, I still need to finish the deck that includes areas of wooden decking and I shall 'skim' a second layer of 0.020" over the top.

 

Stuart

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Welcome to the wonderful world of scratchbuilding Stuart. You have made a great start and I am looking forward to watching it progress! It is a nice subject too!

 

All the best,

 

Ray

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With so much going on in this section lately I missed this one 

Great start there Stuart. :popcorn:

 

beefy 

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Cheers guys. End of another week and time for a little update with my lunchtime effort.

 

20181102-134247.jpg

As I've said, never scratch built a boat before so was unsure as to tackle the hull sides. I decided to to use .5mm plasticard over 2 or 3 frames, leaving the stern. I tackled the stern using Milliput and smoothed it off with a wet finger. A bit rough in places, once sanded and filled should be okay. Not much but 'slowly, slowly, catch a monkey'.

 

Stuart

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Looking good Stuart. Where would we all be without good old Milliput!

 

Terry

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1 hour ago, Terry1954 said:

Where would we all be without good old Milliput!

So true Terry probably making a right mess with some other kind of filler not that I would know  <_<

 

Really starting to take shape now Stuart

 

beefy

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Just to keep you posted, a little update.

 

20181106-160040.jpg

A sequence of filling, sanding and priming ensued and we have this. Not 100% but good enough to move on.

 

20181106-160120.jpg

As mentioned above, I want to add another, thinner deck. This deck was made a little smaller, ie 0.5mm off the outer edge. My reasoning behind this is the later fixing of the bulwarks will need some plastic to attach to but before that, I need to do the deck. The lined areas forward and aft are wooden decks, so it'll be time to scribe some planking spaced at 1mm, then we'll take it from there.

 

Stuart

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Question: The wooden decks, would they be inlaid into the steel decks or laid on top like this?

Another question: Bow windlass or winch, I think it would a simple affair as many tugs didn't have anchors and so was used for 'tug' things, any ideas?

 

Stuart

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Not much of an update but an update it is.

 

20181108-130141-1.jpg

The two larger sections are the decked areas and although it isn't clear, these have been scribed to represent the wooden planks. As far as I can tell from the deck plan, deck prisms were fitted into the large deck area, these are yet to be sorted. The tug was fitted with three bollards; two forward and one aft and these were 'scratched' together thus.

Until next week.

 

Stuart

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Hi there mateys. After the excitement of SMW, it is time to get back to everyday reality.

Upperworks.jpg

Doesn't look much but this is a definite case of measure twice, cut once. Must apologize for the wonky lines, can't remember how I do this in Photoshop, more learning.

Here we have most of the upper works. The left (aft) section of engine room needs a roof fitted, this has a flat centre roof section with sloping sides. The funnel deck is on, just needs a tidy up before looking at funnel, vents and stuff. The funnel deck was also ran through into wheelhouse. The wheelhouse sides and front are at window sill height, the rear being full height to accommodate doors. It's the wheelhouse that will get some attention as it has glasing on three sides and people WILL want to look in...hopefully. The section forward of the wheelhouse will be the galley and is still to be boxed in.

Not much to show for five lunch hours but 'slowly, slowly, catch a monkey'.

 

Stuart

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