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Percival Vega Gull (72002 & 72004) - Civil & Military Service - 1:72 Dora Wings


Julien

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Percival Vega Gull (72002 & 72004)

Civil & Military Service

1:72 Dora Wings

 

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The Vega Gull was a development by Percival of their earlier D-Series Gull. The main advantages over the earlier design was the addition of a 4th seat, dual flight controls, and flaps were fitted. The airframe was made wider, the wings longer and the airframe made more streamlined.  A feature of the aircraft was the ability to fold the wings for storage. The work was attributed to Arthur Bage's arrival at Percival. The resulting Vega Gull had extended range and payload without sacrificing performance. The aircraft was powered by a de Havilland Gipsy Six engine. As well as civilian operators the Air Ministry ordered 15 Aircraft. 11 were used by 24 Sqn RAF, 2 by the FAA, and 3 by British Air Attaches. At the outbreak of WWII many civilian aircraft were impressed into service in Britain and the Commonwealth. 

 

 

The Kit

Dora Wings is a new company to us, and have kindly agreed to send samples for review.  As it is this reviewers opinion that Percival Aircraft made some of the best looking Civil Aircraft in the UK, these new kits are more than welcome. Initially Dora Wings have given us two boxings depicting both the Civilian & Military users of the aircraft.  Like the Proctor Information and help was gratefully received in the production of this kit from John Adams formally of Aeroclub models which can only be a good thing.  Construction is fairly simple just like the real aircraft.  The wheels and their spats are the first parts to be made up and then put to one side. We then move to the cockpit. The instrument panel is made form a plastic part with the film and PE making the front of the panel. This is then added into the coaming. 

 

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Just to go off on a tangent the wings then put together, these are of convention left/right & upper/lower construction. Separate flaps are included as are landing lights for both wings. Now that the wings are done we can move back to the main cabin, the rear bulkhead is installed. Then the controls and seats are put in place, followed by the front firewall and instrument panel we put to one side earlier. The fuselage can then be closed up, and the canopy added. At the rear the rudder is added along with the tailplanes, and at the front the engine front and propeller. The wings can then be added along with the main landing gear. 

 

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Markings

Decals are printed in house For the Military boxing 4 options are provided;

 

  1. L7272 ex G-AFWG Allocated to British Air Attache Buenos Aires, Argentina 1939.
  2. ex L7272 Sold to Argentine Government in 1946
  3. P10 Requisitioned by the Belgian Government 1939
  4. N7571 Requisitioned by the Royal New Zealand Air Force 1944

 

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For the Civilian boxing again 4 options are provided;

 

  1. G-AFBC 1952 Kings Cup Air Race, Joan Lady Sherborne.
  2. G-AFBW Alex Henshaw, Nicosia, Cyprus 1938.
  3. VP-KCC Beryl Markham trans Atlantic flight 1936.
  4. G-AEKE Winner of "Schlesinger Race" 1936.

 

vg06.jpg

 

Conclusion

It is high time that we had some modern toolings of British Civil aircraft from this period 

 

Very Highly recommended.

 

Review sample courtesy of

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I'm interested in picking one of these up, but it would be nice if you gave us a bit of info on what you have in front if you - what's the quality like if the holding like, panel lines and details and what the quality of the decals like etc? I know you said highly recommended but would be helpful before spending money on a kit.

Edited by Tbolt
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7 minutes ago, Tbolt said:

I'm interested in picking one of these up, but it would be nice if you gave us a bit of info on what you have in front if you - what's the quality like if the holding like, panel lines and details and what the quality of the decals like etc? I know you said highly recommended but would be helpful before spending money on a kit.

I generally let the pictures do the talking, but as you have asked the plastic looks quality, the panel lines such as they are are nicely restrained, detail is good and the decals look like they will pose no issues. I did say the decals were printed in house, but on closer inspection they are done by a Ukrainian company Decograph which I cant seem to find any information about, however I note AMP and BPK kits now have decals by them also.

 

Julien

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32 minutes ago, Julien said:

I generally let the pictures do the talking, but as you have asked the plastic looks quality, the panel lines such as they are are nicely restrained, detail is good and the decals look like they will pose no issues. I did say the decals were printed in house, but on closer inspection they are done by a Ukrainian company Decograph which I cant seem to find any information about, however I note AMP and BPK kits now have decals by them also.

 

Julien

Thanks for the info. We can only gain so much info from pictures unless they are close ups.

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I am building/working on both kits - suffice to say they are lovely but need a lot of test fitting and care in interpreting the instructions which are rather generic and do not reflect the parts in the boxes nor the actual aeroplanes represented therein. The general fit of major components is good, but the slot-in nose and rear fuselage underside parts need a bit of fettling. Also be aware that the examples in various museums may not be true to type - the one that is at , I think , Moorabin is a MkIV and cannot be built with these kits ( use the old FROG one) and the one at the South Australian Air Museum is a Mark II that was converted into a civil hack for the Church Mission Society and then into a MarkIII for the museum but still has the Mk II radios behind the rear seats whereas the Mk II has the radio beside the pilot in most cases. The Vega Gull kit should not have landing lights in the wings while the Proctors should have them in both wings while the kits include them in the port wings for both versions - easily fixed. Seats are incorrect for both versions and the control columns are not for all versions - the military ones appear to have sticks rather than spade grips but I could be wrong. Both kits include a lot of 'spare' parts that indicate further versions in the future  and several parts have no reference in the instructions, the PE being particularly the case, some of which is beyond my ability to handle being too small for my clumsy fingers.

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  • 5 years later...

Just wanted to add my five cents - as I'm going through the assembly of 72002 Vega Gull kit. Overall the kit is okay. Nice surface details. Good fit. Underside does require some work but no drama. Some flash here or there but nothing intolerable.

Still I did some observations that hopefully someone could find helpful.

- spinner shape. Kit gives two options: parts 24 and 25. 24 seems like a normal spinner shape, 25 is somewhat roundish shorter one. In reality Vega Gulls had either normal spinner or extended spear-looking ones - like instruction shows for VP-KCC. However there is no spear-shaped spinner in the kit. 

- radiator opening is quite large here but no engine details are provided. Also as there is an opening on the bottom side aft of engine cowling - you'll get a see-through effect. Other kit manufacturers of airplanes with similar radiator would at least provide a "partition wall" with more or less crude engine front elements. Here you got nothing while on real thing radiator and engine elements are quite observable. I've already scratched something to resemble the front engine part. 

- kit has no upholstered civil pilot seats. Seems what is provided is for military Proctor with or without cushions. Moreover instruction asks you to use parts 28/29 which are the military seats without cushions. I'd suggest to use parts 31/32 and maybe reshape backrest.

- in general instruction is unfortunately containing quite a lot of errors. For example it asks you to use part 49 as engine cowling while it's the one for Proctor. For Vega Gull you need part 52. Some errors are made with arrows showing attachment points. E.g. instruction asks you to attach control sticks to where pedals should be attached. Not sure what p/e part 8 is but it definitely should not be on the instrument panel. Lastly drilling guidance is a complete nonsense. 

- everyone said about completely missing painting guidance which IMO is a huge screw-up. BTW I noted that many Ukrainian born instructions completely ignore interior painting guides. But at least they normally give you exterior colours.

- someone already mentioned about suspicious red colour for G-AFBC which was blue and silver per race program. Also instruction tells you to have number '67' in six places while there is only 4 such decals in the kit. 

Edited by Dennis_C
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On 26/09/2018 at 10:43, Horatio Gruntfuttock said:

The Vega Gull kit should not have landing lights in the wings while the Proctors should have them in both wings while the kits include them in the port wings for both versions - easily fixed.

I think it varied. 

3270-1.jpg

This is clearly a Vega Gull with one (or two?) landing light. 

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Its a nice kit if a bit tricky to put together - the IP was one of the best I've ever seen in that scale. The only gotcha I found was the fit of the doors into the canopy if showing them closed, I couldn't get a decent fit and I'm still not happy with mine

 

TT

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18 hours ago, Dennis_C said:

- in general instruction is unfortunately containing quite a lot of errors. For example it asks you to use part 49 as engine cowling while it's the one for Proctor. For Vega Gull you need part 52. Some errors are made with arrows showing attachment points. E.g. instruction asks you to attach control sticks to where pedals should be attached. Not sure what p/e part 8 is but it definitely should not be on the instrument panel. Lastly drilling guidance is a complete nonsense. 

- everyone said about completely missing painting guidance which IMO is a huge screw-up. BTW I noted that many Ukrainian born instructions completely ignore interior painting guides. But at least they normally give you exterior colours.

- someone already mentioned about suspicious red colour for G-AFBC which was blue and silver per race program. Also instruction tells you to have number '67' in six places while there is only 4 such decals in the kit. 

Thank you @Dennis_C, this is very useful information, I hope I remember your post when I build mine some day. I just started their Lysander, there is a good build build article on kfs-miniatures, I hope it will help me to finish the kit. There's a huge discrepancy between how good Dora Wings parts look on the sprue and how awful their instructions are. I would have bought their P-43, but I'm not sure about the landing gear assembly, looks very confusing and complicated, and there is absolutely no reference material for that area.

Do you know about G-AFBW, was is red? Mixing that turquoise to match the decals can be quite tricky.

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33 minutes ago, TheKinksFan said:

Do you know about G-AFBW, was is red? Mixing that turquoise to match the decals can be quite tricky.

Who knows.... on old black and white photoes from the 30s painted Vega Gulls all look quite dark which in my understanding can suggest deep red/burgundy colour easily. Or deep dark blue...

https://www.alamy.com/percival-vega-gull-image69920779.html?imageid=0D2DD8D0-D349-43C7-8361-596D1944B233&p=211879&pn=1&searchId=db6200b9124336016171076d78e80f77&searchtype=0

G-AFBC on the colored photoes from the 1952 race is lighter than coloured Vega Gulls from the 30s. 

https://www.alamy.com/percival-vega-gull-image69920784.html?imageid=BFD2F906-2E2E-43F8-B5DC-967FFC186754&p=211879&pn=1&searchId=db6200b9124336016171076d78e80f77&searchtype=0

Note number '67' likely in six positions as per Dora's instruction but not in line with their decals sheet.....

 

Edited by Dennis_C
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7 minutes ago, Dennis_C said:

Who knows.... on old black and white photoes from the 30s painted Vega Gulls all look quite dark which in my understanding can suggest deep red/burgundy colour easily. Or deep dark blue...

I can't resist with deep red, so I will go with that. If manufacturers (and also decal designers) would spend more time on Google looking at old photos, they would avoid stupid mistakes like that with the missing 67s. It's so easy now that there's no excuses for not doing it.

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Civil front seats. Difference to those in the kit is quite obvious.

724-1.jpg

A question - were civil aircraft in the 30s equipped with seat belts at all? Only pilot seats? Passengers' sofa? 

Edited by Dennis_C
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