Jump to content

1/72 Jotika Caldercraft HMS Victory By Kevin


Kevin Aris
 Share

Recommended Posts

My conservatory has just been updated with LED Lighting decent power, computer connection and brightened up, and will serve as a winter months mancave (no spray painting or power tool sanding, so its time to show you the return of my HMS Victory

HMEd8Tl.jpg

wocbpez.jpg

 

b08fbmL.jpg

Jccirmf.jpg

XZwDzBL.jpg

Edited by Kevin Aris
  • Like 16
Link to comment
Share on other sites

oOEUw58.jpg

Construction[edit]

In December 1758, the commissioner of Chatham Dockyard was instructed to prepare a dry dock for the construction of a new first-rate ship.[2] This was an unusual occurrence at the time, as the Royal Navy preferred smaller and more manoeuvrable ships, and it was unusual for more than two to be in commission simultaneously; during the whole of the 18th century only ten were constructed.[3]

The outline plans were based on HMS Royal George which had been launched at Woolwich Dockyard in 1756 and the naval architect chosen to design the ship was Sir Thomas Slade who, at the time, was the appointed Surveyor of the Navy.[4] She was designed to carry at least 100 guns and was established with that number of guns; in practice, her armament varied from 104 to 106 guns and carronades. In January 1808 the Victory was reduced to a 98-gun second rate, but was reclassed as a 104-gun first rate in February 1817.[5]

The keel was laid on 23 July 1759 in the Old Single Dock (since renamed No. 2 Dock and now Victory Dock), and the name was finally chosen in October 1760.[6] In 1759 theSeven Years War was going well for Britain; land victories had been won at Quebec and Minden and naval battles had been won at Lagos and Quiberon Bay. It was the Annus Mirabilis, or Year of Victories, and the ship's name may have been chosen to commemorate it or it may have been chosen simply because out of the seven names shortlisted,Victory was the only one not in use.[7][8] There were some doubts whether this was a suitable name since the previous first-rate Victory had been lost with all on board in 1744.[8]

Once the frame had been built, it was normal to cover the ship up and leave it for several months to season but the end of the Seven Years' War meant that she remained in this condition for nearly three years, which helped her subsequent longevity.[9][10] Work restarted in autumn 1763 and she was finally launched on 7 May 1765,[11] having cost £63,176 and 3 shillings,[5] the equivalent of £7.31 million today.[12] Around 6000 trees were used in her construction, of which 90% were oak and the remainder elm, pine and fir, together with a small quantity of Lignum Vitae.[13]

Because there was no immediate use for her, she was placed in ordinary—in reserve, roofed over, dismasted and placed under general maintenance—moored in the River Medwayfor 13 years until France joined the American War of Independence.[14] She was commissioned in March 1778 under Captain John Lindsay but he was transferred to HMS Prince George in May 1778 when Admiral the Honourable Augustus Keppel decided to raise his flag in her, and appoint Rear Admiral John Campbell (1st Captain) and Captain Jonathan Faulknor (2nd Captain).[5]

The Victory was armed with smooth bore, cast iron cannon. Initially she carried thirty 42-pounders (19 kg) on her lower deck, twenty-eight 24-pounders (11 kg) on her middle deck, and thirty 12-pounders (5 kg) on her upper deck, together with twelve 6-pounders on her quarterdeck and forecastle. In May 1778, the 42-pounders were replaced by 32-pounders (15 kg), but the 42-pounders were reinstated in April 1779; eventually, in 1803, the 42-pounders were permanently replaced by 32-pounders. In 1782, all the 6-pounders were replaced by 12-pounders. Later, she also carried two carronade guns, firing 68-lb (31 kg) round shot.[15]

Edited by Kevin Aris
  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The carcus is quite quickly built up, and non of it is seen ever again, double planking keeps everything rigid, the gun port templates were my biggest nightmare to get lines up, as there is at this stage very little to ensure everything is true and lined up
jhXx5w5.jpg

cDJE81A.jpg

 

sOP3e4w.jpgsPNrbLU.jpg

oKPhiJi.jpg

d5KmMxo.jpg

GTUGp2R.jpg

UFmmHsQ.jpg

 

  • Like 11
Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, Courageous said:

Looking good Kev. I wish I had the space to build and display one of these.

 

Stuart

lol so do I, its no where as long as the Fife or the SD 14 build (1.3m), but where as they are quite low in relation to the hull this is about the same, then with the spars fitted it gets wider than it is at present 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

the copper tiles approx 2500 took me weeks to finish,not only to go on correctly, matching both sides but to look good as well, i perhaps lost about 500 in removing ones around the stern as it was the worst bit to get right 

IQ5pF0G.jpg

 

QBwawtW.jpg

aB9649V.jpg

WCwVi1j.jpg

Edited by Kevin Aris
  • Like 17
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, longshanks said:

I can only guess at how many hours have gone into this build thus far. I can feel my life ebbing away just looking at those tiles.

 

Congratulations on your achievements so far

 

Kev

i used to keep a build log, but lol what do you record, i spent as long researching where a rigging line goes than it does to cut,the rope, stain it, wax it splice it and add blocks, and then put it in position, estimates from other builds say about 2500 to 3000 hours, and i am approx 2/3 the way through 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello Kevin, many thanks for taking the time to post these updates.

 

This kit was always on my wants list, and I was inspired by a special issue magazine (Model Boats?) years ago, but never could afford it. It is now way over the £700 you paid and has not got any easier to afford!

 

I was amazed by your use of large pins to keep things in place, a great idea. I do have a part-started wooden 'Clara May' ketch on top of my wardrobe, so this may inspire me to have another look at it.

 

Thanks again,

 

Ray

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, Ray S said:

Hello Kevin, many thanks for taking the time to post these updates.

 

This kit was always on my wants list, and I was inspired by a special issue magazine (Model Boats?) years ago, but never could afford it. It is now way over the £700 you paid and has not got any easier to afford!

 

I was amazed by your use of large pins to keep things in place, a great idea. I do have a part-started wooden 'Clara May' ketch on top of my wardrobe, so this may inspire me to have another look at it.

 

Thanks again,

 

Ray

Ray its a great kit, but repetition has to be taken into consideration, there is so much of everything, Gunport lids, lots of them, i found as i progressed, i got better and faster, but as they were getting better the earlier ones were looking that poor i did them again, then i ripped the whole lot off and had them in the slightly open position, rigged them again, then removed them all to put the simulated sheaf into place will post phots later as i update the build log

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

up to the bow now, the head timbers (cheeks) take some time to get right, the wood is cnc but the final shaping depends on the builder as no two builds art the same, the hawse holes are for the anchor ropes to pass through and laid through the gun deck prior to playing out or stowing in the rope lockers

Ydg6Leu.jpg

4xX5584.jpg

 

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

this series of photo's takes me to the end of April 2012, and around 560 hours in build time
Gun decks
the middle and lower gun decks are simulated by a dummy barrel, sticking out from a false bulkhead, as can be seen in the early carcass photograph.
The upper gun deck is a different matter though, as about 20% of it can been seen through the skid beams which is where the ships boats are stowed when not in action
Rightly or wrongly, the amount of work that can be put into this is very much up to your own discretion, if you allow say perhaps 5 hours per cannon on batch building times 30, and then rig them, you have to remember that a lot will be lost forever, and only yourself knows what went into it, on the other hand, i only rigged the ones that possibly could be seen, - my choice

oiVRJQt.jpg

Ke0Jr55.jpg

CfgJcqo.jpg

a9AcaYD.jpg

hPnq2FO.jpg

sjR2BTM.jpg

 

  • Like 12
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, MarkSH said:

Fascinating to see how one of these wooden ship models go together, I have always had a hankering to have a go at one, thanks for posting and great work.

go for it mark, you can always say you tried it

as for my build it starts to tidy up now as the 1/4 galleries get fitted and the front end gets built on

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

gunports

 

initially i had all ports open, just like all the other builds, but then a decision was made to put into a diorama setting, lol this meant all the carriages made for the main gun deck had to be removed, but as the build had progreed they were basicly broken up inside the ship and tipped out of any hole big enough vie shaking

BA4T7fE.jpg

all ripped out

a lot of the lids were replaced to fit better within the hull, then rigged which was then done again to simulate the sheath which pulls the lids open

hmAjpE8.jpg

  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good evening everyone, 

hope you are not getting to bored of my babble on this site, if so please tell me

Main masts - i will try to identify everything as it is posted

as you may or may not know masts were made up of many pieces of wood that were banded together, i have used 13mm dowel which has been turned down to 12.7mm, styrene strips have been used to simulate the banding
YzA4g6q.jpg
  

this is then tapered down to 8mm on two sides only
yIRS2Bn.jpg

  
  
a simple jig was made to allow the tapering, a nail was put through to stop the wood twisting whilst being sanded and allowed me to rotate 180 deg to sand the other side

sHPoiBM.jpg

 

fNBkwlq.jpg5g0K5vF.jpg

jbvcvlx.jpg

cWGdQmM.jpg

RFjCcxX.jpg

kUkXYDP.jpg

ZJyeCZk.jpg

owrFWIj.jpg

rtdqXZp.jpg

dmRrD07.jpg

  • Like 11
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...