Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Sign in to follow this  
Rob 1

Revell 1:48 'Stearman', U.S. Army

Recommended Posts

I haven't built an airplane for while, so to add to a few trainer types I already have, had a go at this new Revell 1:48 'Stearman' kit, which is an interesting (and colorful) subject of a classic primary trainer of it's time, and is such a good basic aircraft that they've been in fairly widespread civilian use ever since. There's some nice HD videos on You Tube of this type being flown.

 

gVglPc5.jpg

 

Gl0sjMK.jpg

 

NkXi9L9.jpg

 

72CUqud.jpg

 

Edited by Rob 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice, tidy build of this classic and the last photo is just great – the machine waiting at dawn for its barnstorming pilot and a nervous, paying passenger, somewhere in the midwest…

 

In fact, this very nice and quite new kit would be ideal to convert to one of the many, more or less improvised, cropdusters that buzzed the Kansan plains in the fifties and sixties. Who can forget Cary Grant sprinting in a cornfield to escape from a Stearman, "dustin' crops where there ain't no crops"?

 

Kind regards,

 

Joachim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Reini78 said:

Great job!:thumbsup:

What did you use for rigging?

More important to me right now is how did you fix it? 

Good looking plane as well. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks all for your comments. The rigging is E Z Line (fine), as it has elasticity it can be fitted with just a small amount of tension and they stay taught, and survive any amount of being caught or knocked.

It was fitted by drilling fine holes in the wings and fuselage, and glued on the inside faces. I would warn anyone using this that spraying Halfords primer after completing the rigging was a big mistake, lesson learned: better to prime the parts first before assembly with the rigging.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is how I did it. The problem I had was sometimes it would stick straight away and most it won't. I ended up in a real mess and breaking the wing off. This time i'm going to try using kicker to see if that will help. Hopefully it won't melt the EZline.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I built the aircraft up after pre drilling the holes in the lower half of the top wing, but omitted the upper half of the top wing. I threaded each line through those tiny holes, pulled them tight one by one, put a dab of standard polysterene cement over each hole/threaded end, turned the aircraft up-side-down and clipped a mini clothes peg to each dangling line end to keep them all taught while the glue set overnight. The upper half of the top wing then nicely covered all the glued ends.

 

First time I've done it this way but works well. May do some WWI planes in the future using this method.

 

This is the drill set I use for all modelling work (available at Hobbycraft stores), as the thicker shaft doesn't need a driller, all holes can be done by rotating between finger and thumb. The smallest drill is good for rigging lines.

microbox-shanked-drill-set-10-0-5-to-2-2

Edited by Rob 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×