Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Moa

Sir George Cayley's Flying Carriage, 1853 , scratch 1/72nd

Recommended Posts

Here is Sir George’s flying carriage in all its kite-looking beauty.

I made this model some time ago, but thought of posting now here for the fellow BModelers.

I followed neither the “flying” replicas nor the modern renditions but the original Cayley’s drawings. In his description he states that wire or rope may be used for the rigging, so I used “rope”, more accordingly to contemporary ballooning and nautical practices. In his drawings the fore mast does not protrude above the sail, and so it was depicted here too.

The sight of such aviation dawn designs is refreshing and helps us understand and appreciate the hard labor, keen minds and ingenuity of the aviation pioneers.

31a.jpg

 

31b.jpg

 

33.jpg

 

34.jpg

 

35.jpg

 

36.jpg

 

38.jpg

 

42.jpg

 

45.jpg

 

49.jpg

 

08.jpg

 

12.jpg

 

25.jpg

 

26.jpg

 

27.jpg

 

29.jpg

Edited by Moa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A great project very well done by scratch-building. Thanks for sharing.

 

Do you mind me asking how you did the wood finish?

 

Regards,

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Dazey said:

A great project very well done by scratch-building. Thanks for sharing.

 

Do you mind me asking how you did the wood finish?

 

Regards,

David

Hi David

Thanks for your kind words.

Sure:

A very light wood color (almost skin color) acrylic base, and then a few shades of oil paint stretched along with an old brush. You make a mistake, you just rub it off.

Finished later with a clear varnish.

Cheers

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, John D.C. Masters said:

You, sir, are a true artist!

Actually, John, I am, in real life 😉

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, invidia said:

Fantastic looking model, interesting subject. Did it fly??  

Reputedly yes, scaring the wits out of his poor coachman (that piloted it).

Accounts diverge, but it actually flew in a somewhat controlled glide for some distance.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, John D.C. Masters said:

That explains a great deal.

Have been told that many times, but more often with an accompanying grin.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Utterly different.

 

Brilliant!

 

Trevor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What a fantastic job,i'd never heard of him or his flying machine until now so i'll have to read up about it....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is absolutely brilliant!  I love the figurehead.  What did you use for the wing covering?

 

AW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very interesting and well done! I hav not heard about him, in Poland more popular are German and French pioneers (and few Polish), what is not good I am affraid.

Cheers

J-W

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What a terrific model.  A really interesting project beautifully rendered.  It looks like you should go in for model boat building as well.  The pioneers of aviation are somewhat neglected in modelling terms so it makes a very pleasant change to see one of these contraptions.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brilliant model of a largely forgotten pioneer of flying, who made the first successful man carrying glider and established some of the basic principles of flight. The fact that is less well known is surprising, given that he was a Yorkshireman. 

Mr T living in Yorkshire and married to a Yorkshire lass.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Moa said:

Hi David

Thanks for your kind words.

Sure:

A very light wood color (almost skin color) acrylic base, and then a few shades of oil paint stretched along with an old brush. You make a mistake, you just rub it off.

Finished later with a clear varnish.

Cheers

Hi Moa,


Thanks for the information. I have oil paints for washes, so it should be easy to experiment with different colours.

 

Regards,

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Superb model that really does put the later development of heavier than air flying in perspective.

 

My personal favourite of the early pioneers is Otto Lilienthal, who (43 years after Sir George Cayley) might have become the first to pilot a powered aeroplane, had he not crashed in his glider in 1896 and broken his back. Allegedly, his last words were: 'Sacrifices must be made'.

 

Kind regards,

 

Joachim

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great work, how did you make the wheels (?), they look tricky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Outstanding build and a great subject,possibly the oldest flying machine to appear on Britmodeller?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, invidia said:

Fantastic looking model, interesting subject. Did it fly??  

Isn't this the machine flown a good few years ago by Derek Piggot at (I believe) Lasham?  He did say never again!

Skip

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...