Jump to content

German Rocket Launcher with 28cm WK SPR & 32cm WK Flamm (35269) 1:35


Recommended Posts

German Rocket Launcher with 28cm WK SPR & 32cm WK Flamm (35269)

1:35 MiniArt

 

boxtop.jpg

 

Based upon the chassis of the 7.62cm FK 39(r) field gun, which was in turn based on a Soviet 76mm M1936 gun, this rocket launcher was cobbled together using the frame, trailing arms and part of the breech and recuperator assembly, with a framework "shelf" welded to either side of the barrel on which two 23cm or 32cm Nebelwerfer 41 crates could be mounted.  These were spin-stabilised rockets that carried either high explosive warheads in the smaller diameter, or 50 litres of an incendiary mix of oil for the larger 32cm rocket.  They were both suspended in wooden crates of the same dimensions, so they were interchangeable without any adaptation to the launcher.  The rockets were launched by an electric signal, and due to their rather noxious vapour trail the name nebelwerfer literally means "smoke bomb".  These weapons were used in stand-alone framework launchers, as well as attached to the side of a half-track, which gained the nickname Stuka zu Fuß, "Stuka on foot".  Their smoke trails made it likely that they would attract return fire, so mobility was key, which led to the easily transported versions finding favour, and the self-propelled half-track version even more so.

 

 

The Kit

This is a newly tooled kit that utilises a lot of the parts of another MiniArt kit of the 7.62cm FK 39(r) (35104), which gives us the chassis, running gear and some of the upper structure. I don't have that kit, but on reflection I think I seem to have three sprues of it, which includes the barrel, splinter shield and most if not all of the elevation mechanism.  The box is slightly larger than a figure box and opens at the top, containing nineteen sprues of various sizes, a sheet of Photo-Etch brass, decal sheet and a rather nice instruction booklet in a glossy colour printed cover.  It's an interesting topic that combines a lesser known gun and these fearsome rockets that were used to good effect during WWII.

 

sprue1.jpg

 

sprue2.jpg

 

sprue3.jpg

 

pe.jpg

 

Construction begins with the trails, which are rectangular in section and taper toward the rear.  These have the usual grab handles and towing hitch applied, as well as the ground spike and spades, which can be show deployed for combat, or stowed for transport as you see fit, with alternative construction steps along the way.  The carriage is next with the single axle through the centre, attaching to the trails by massive hinges, and each axle end is the capped off by a road wheel that is laminated from three parts and a rear hub, which results in a good representation of the grooved solid rubber tyres and pressed steel hub.  The lower sled and remnants of the recuperator and breech are fitted next along with a large counterbalance that was welded in place on the real thing.  The trunnions are made up on each side with some PE parts, and the whole assembly is installed on the carriage with recoil springs and the elevation mechanism.  Meanwhile the crates and rockets are assembled, with four provided of each diameter in eight identical crates, four of which have the adapters for the smaller 28cm rounds.  Frames are added to each side of the breech for the crates using PE parts, and they are each held in place with a cage that is folded up from PE, with two bracing strips between the cages.  The transport lock between the trails is fitted in the stowed or active position, and the pins that lock the hinges of the trails are fitted in appropriate sockets depending on which variation you choose.

 

 

Markings

The small sheet of decals is used on the rockets and their cases, with their positions shown on the painting diagram at the rear of the booklet.  The rounds are all painted olive green, but their crates can be Dark Yellow, German Grey or bare wood.  The gun/launcher/carriage is painted dark yellow, with the counterweight in bare steel, so you can have a bit of fun adding surface rust if you feel like it.  There's probably plenty of scope for sooting up the launcher too, given their reputation.

 

 

Conclusion

I built a six-tubed Nebelwerfer a few years back and have a fondness for their oddities.  Detail is excellent throughout, and the supplied munitions are generous, giving opportunity for diorama use or loading up the towing vehicle with ready rounds.  Now, where can I get a Stuka zu Fuß from?

 

Highly recommended

bin.jpg

 

Review sample courtesy of

logo.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...