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Anthony Kesterton

Parc Models Sputnik kit

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I picked up a copy of the 1/144 Parc Models Sputnik kit this week  Not opened the wrapping yet, but the moulding looks good, not sure about the fit and accuracy yet.

 

Anyone built this yet?

 

thanks

 

anthony

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This is a rebox of old Apex kit.

I think there was a detailed analysys of accuracy somewhere on NewWare web site. 

 

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The Sputnik must be pretty tiny. Even in 1/1 scale it isn't very big - 

 

 Sputnik1_f.jpg

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"Sputnik" here refers to R-7 rocket that delivered this cute ball with mustaches to the orbit

apexsput.jpg

 

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Ah - you meant the rocket rather than the satellite. 

 

The rocket was technically referred to as the R-7. "Sputnik" in Russian translates as "Satellite" - they weren't being terribly imaginative when giving it a name.

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I made a model of the actual Sputnik 1 last year. It is made from a ping pong ball and works out at about 1/13 scale - 

 

FE0i3kvP.jpg

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I recall reading that this kit was more accurate than the Airfix one, which was too slender

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Yes! This is the article I was talking about above.

I thought it was published on NewWare site, evidently I was wrong.

 

Thanks Anthony!

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The Airfix kit was issued in 1970 when there was limited access to technical information on Soviet boosters and spacecraft.

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1 hour ago, Eric Mc said:

The Airfix kit was issued in 1970 when there was limited access to technical information on Soviet boosters and spacecraft.

As shown by the shapeless bulges on the Soyuz payload shroud which are actually the vanes that deploy in an abort situation.

 

Unfortunately Mat Irvine was unable to persuade Airfix to make a more accurate version when they reissued the kit alongside the Saturn V and IB, with the corrected CSM.

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Westerners didn't really get a really good look at these Russian rockets and spacecraft until the Americans got involved with the Soviets in the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project. This began in 1972 and at first the Russians were reluctant to part with too much information. NASA basically told them that the project would be off if they didn't open up a lot more than they initially seemed to want to. In particular, NASA wanted the full report on the accident that befell Soyuz 11 when the three cosmonauts died during re-entry.

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