Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Ah - you meant the rocket rather than the satellite. 

 

The rocket was technically referred to as the R-7. "Sputnik" in Russian translates as "Satellite" - they weren't being terribly imaginative when giving it a name.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I recall reading that this kit was more accurate than the Airfix one, which was too slender

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes! This is the article I was talking about above.

I thought it was published on NewWare site, evidently I was wrong.

 

Thanks Anthony!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Eric Mc said:

The Airfix kit was issued in 1970 when there was limited access to technical information on Soviet boosters and spacecraft.

As shown by the shapeless bulges on the Soyuz payload shroud which are actually the vanes that deploy in an abort situation.

 

Unfortunately Mat Irvine was unable to persuade Airfix to make a more accurate version when they reissued the kit alongside the Saturn V and IB, with the corrected CSM.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Westerners didn't really get a really good look at these Russian rockets and spacecraft until the Americans got involved with the Soviets in the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project. This began in 1972 and at first the Russians were reluctant to part with too much information. NASA basically told them that the project would be off if they didn't open up a lot more than they initially seemed to want to. In particular, NASA wanted the full report on the accident that befell Soyuz 11 when the three cosmonauts died during re-entry.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...