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goggsy

Horsefly bites?

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I went wild swimming last weekend and came back with four big painful lumps on one shoulder. I got one of my colleagues, an ex nurse, to have a look at them and she reckoned they were bites of some kind. I still have two big red lumps that are very painful to touch although they don’t ”appear” to be infected, but what is more bothersome is that the skin around and in my armpit is really sore. It’s kind of odd because to look at there is little to see, just a couple of spots, but the whole area is tender and uncomfortable when touched by a shirt. I’m think they are likely horsefly bites and was wondering if anyone has experience of this and any suggestions for remedy? I don’t see the point in going to the doctor - even if I could get an appointment in the next few days I doubt they’d do anything over a bit of discomfort other than tell me to take paracetamol. I did have a raised temperature and felt under the weather for a few days but that seems to have passed now so I don’t think it’s Dengue fever!

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Was at my cousins in Whitehaven last week. A horsefly (Clegs to us Reiver folk) landed on a car. Big critters aren't they? Certainly about in your neck of the woods.

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One bit my wife on her forearm towards her wrist 14 days ago. The wound tracked up her arm as far as her elbow. 5 days of antibiotics did not touch it. So another set of stronger ones were prescribed to which she was allergic to and the thing is just about gone now. 2X visit from Doctor 3X visit from District nurse.

Tell me about the bloody things.

 

Google horsefly and images and se what these buggers can do!

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They’re nasty buggers, they’ve got massive jaws and they’re not afraid to use them. Plus they carry infection. 

 

The only other thing I’m wondering is whether I’ve had a spider trapped in my shirt after I got out of the water. An equally unpalatable thought.

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@goggsy I would get yourself to the doctor pronto. If I recall correctly, and I'm no medic, the armpit contains lymph nodes and, if you have an infection, they will be inflamed.

 

Clegs/horseflies are really nasty critters and not to be messed with. They DO NOT sting and suck like a mossie or Midgie but rather saw away with their mouthparts and those mouthparts probably chewed a horse, cow or sheep etc. before you met it and that inter species chewing is why they can readily create infections. I have even known a lassie who had to be airlifted from the isle of Bute as a horsefly bite had turned into a nasty abscess within hours.

 

Read the first post in this link and see if you are displaying similar symptoms: http://www.horseandhound.co.uk/forums/archive/index.php/t-320252.html

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Just done a tiny bit of research and swollen lymphs seem more indicative of a Tick than a horsefly so watch out for the classic 'bullseye' of lyme disease as well. Don't mean to scare you but there are certain things you should be aware of and watch out for with biting and stinging insects even in Britain where we have very few that can really do harm to you. Early treatment is key to avoiding nasty long term consequences.

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Fair enough thanks, I’ll make an appointment in the morning. Just to clarify though, I don’t seem to have any swelling, rash or red line denoting infection, the skin just feels sore. There were four bites originally but two seem to be disappearing, leaving two that are red rimmed and do look a bit infected if truth be told. I’ll ask for antibiotics and go from there.

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10 hours ago, goggsy said:

so I don’t think it’s Dengue fever!

Unlikely to be that as I believe it's mainly tropical and sub tropical areas. When I was a patient in St. Pancras Tropical Disease Hospital, I was checked out for that. Apparently, one of the tell tale signs is a rash on the palms of the hands.

The horsefly bite situation is obviously increasing as there was a slot of BBC Breakfast this morning with a couple of experts on the subject.

 

John.

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Tick bites can give you Lyme's disease. Easily treated, but nasty if not. You should see a doctor soon.

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Got an appointment for 10am, let’s see what they say. 

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57 minutes ago, Bullbasket said:

... it's mainly tropical and sub tropical areas...

Pretty much describes Cumbria at the moment, we’ve had no rain in a month and even the peat bogs are bone dry...

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So anyway, Doctor reckons that I’ve got a virus and the pain I’m having under the arms is a result of that. He says there’s no infection and has recommended keeping the bites clean and taking paracetamol for the pain. Could be worse then. 

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Fairly rare where I'm at and at the moment.

 

Enjoy your selves ...

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13 hours ago, goggsy said:

wild swimming

 

Wossat then? Serious question, afaik know swimming's swimming. River, creek, sea or swimming pool (eww), it's all the same.

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47 minutes ago, Rob G said:

 

Wossat then? Serious question, afaik know swimming's swimming. River, creek, sea or swimming pool (eww), it's all the same.

 

less shorts...

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It’s swimming without having to dodge around the group of children doing slow motion Kung fu in the shallow end, the elderly chap who doesn’t so much swim as drift up and down like a Portuguese man’o war, and the plasters and hockle floating around. The upside is you usually get the place to yourself, the downside is that you could drown, get poisoned, or eaten by something.

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Myself I only swim at all if I fall in. Haven't been near a swimming pool since I was in my early teens although I have landed in the drink a few times over the years and managed to swim to safety so I guess you don't forget how once you've learned.

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20 hours ago, paul178 said:

One bit my wife on her forearm towards her wrist 14 days ago. The wound tracked up her arm as far as her elbow. 5 days of antibiotics did not touch it. So another set of stronger ones were prescribed to which she was allergic to and the thing is just about gone now. 2X visit from Doctor 3X visit from District nurse.

Tell me about the bloody things.

 

Google horsefly and images and se what these buggers can do!

I really wish I hadn't googled that. That's one nasty insect.

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Aye they really are horrors. A few times, back when I was a biker, They hit my visor and then the airstream carried them over the surface in a big bloody smear. I assume the blood wasn't theirs but rather a victims'. I see a fly called the Blackfly or Blandford fly is having a resurgence in England too.

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4 hours ago, goggsy said:

 hockle

I haven't known anybody else use that word in years. I have to explain what it means to people down in the SW.

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Vinnie you coulld close the page. I had to look at it daily and change the dressing!😀

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44 minutes ago, Beardie said:

Blandford fly is having a resurgence in England too.

It certainly is...

038762f7-f740-4364-98e6-dde72f0a3b33.JPG

 

:drink:

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2 hours ago, Darby said:

I haven't known anybody else use that word in years. I have to explain what it means to people down in the SW.

Aye, northern things.

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Not specifically about Horse flies, but earlier in the year I asked for advice about avoiding midge bites as Mrs Gorby is frequently feasted upon by anything from the insect world. Following advice, she has been taking vitamin B for several months and it is very noticeable that she has had a drastic reduction in the number of bites this year – only two or three.

Incidentally, we didn't encounter any midges in Scotland for the entire too weeks (apparently either too warm or too windy for the little buggers).

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Aye the midgie count has been down somewhat around here as it has been too hot and too dry for the poor wee things.

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