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Olivier de St Raph

Ford Mustang "1965" Convertible 1/16 from the Coupe AMT kit: the Indy 500 version

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About the Molotow LC, a question remains not totally clear for me: will I get a better result applying first a very Gloss Black, or not?

I need to do a last trial and a comparison to decide. If the result is the same, of course, I will apply the Molotow directly, as the ArtPrimo (I am still expecting for an answer about the pressure of spraying) suggests.

I am preparing the very Gloss black primer, using the same technique than with the body color (see above): 

1- Thin coat of Tamiya X-1 thinned with 96° alcohol

C3cgA2.jpg

 

2- After drying, Alclad Klear Kote not diluted:

CTsHd6.jpg

 

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If it helps....I have only experienced problems in getting a smooth overall coat of Molotow when using black base coats....so...as such I do not use a black base.

 

One tip I can offer...I have used different acrylic metals as a base coat....sealing them before applying the Molotow.....and the results are very subtle changes in the tone of the Molotow.

 

Regards

 

Ron

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1 hour ago, silver911 said:

One tip I can offer...I have used different acrylic metals as a base coat....sealing them before applying the Molotow.....and the results are very subtle changes in the tone of the Molotow.

 

Thanks Ron for sharing your experience with the Molotow.

Though, I am not sure I understood what you meant there. If I did, you say you got changes of the final Molotow aspect when applying such or such acrylic metal base coat. I am surprised if that is right, because I just applied the Molotow on either the Black base coat and the direct plastic and I could not see any significant difference. My own conclusion was that there was no interest to apply any base coat under the Molotow, because of its very high covering power, the latter hiding completely the base coat. With an Alclad Chrome, fe, the Black base was really necessary to get a good result. For me, it is a major advantage of the Molotow, making the work more simple (only one coat, no base coat, no dilution, the dream!!). On the other hand, I think the surface must be as clean as possible and with a very smooth surface (sand up to 3000 grit or more). Another major point imho is that the Molotow must be shaken strongly to get an homogeneous result.

 

sFd1hA.jpg

 

N.B: the photo has been done while the Molotow had been sprayed less than 10 mn before. I noticed, during my previous trials, that the best result is got after the complete drying time with this product (about 24h).

 

P.S: Bernard has sent me very good infos about the bumper, on which I will come-back in another post. I thank him warmly for his great contribution. He should tomorrow measure the calender hexagones, so that I will be able to order the right Aber grille...

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As I said just above, Bernard brought me some useful precisions about the bumpers and the shields ("bananas"). 

The latter are 20 mm (1,25 mm at 1/16 while they are about 2 mm now - and I have ever reduced them a lot! -) and 35 mm at their base in contact with the body (2,18 mm while they are about 3 mm now - same comment -). 

He gave me other infos on which I will come-back later, especially the lenght of the soft top main arm... 

 

EWznCb.png

 

XipoKM.jpg

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Bernard has kindly measured the hexagons size, it is 10,5 mm on flat, which means about 0,67 mm at 1/16 (and the calander grille is about 0,8 mm thickness which means 0,05 mm at 1/16)  . The smallest Aber hexagonal mesh (ref. S 23) are 1 mm on flat, which seems to be 50% too big. Would someone know a reference of smaller hexagonal mesh (other manufacturer)?

Though, I tried to check, considering the proportions: the Aber mesh are 78 mm lenght, while my Mustang grille is 60 mm width. Here are 3 Aber mesh options:

dj0Xyv.png

 

Conclusion: unless any of you has a better idea, I will order the S 23 Aber for my grille.

 

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Oliver,

 

Such beautiful work👍

 

I too have used the Molotow pens and find them to be a great tool when I’m not up to using Bare Metal Foil.

 

You are quite the artist 👩‍🎨 

 

Cheers,

 

Mr.Happy (In name only)

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16 hours ago, Mr.Happy said:

I too have used the Molotow pens and find them to be a great tool when I’m not up to using Bare Metal Foil.

 

Thanks a lot Mr Happy for your kind words, welcome on the topic and thanks for your contribution, by reminding the BMF option, still relevant.

For chromes on my 1/25 Chevy Bel Air Convertible, I had used both BMF and Alclad Chrome (post# 11, p.1). The BMF may give very good results, but, especially for a bumper at such a big scale, the problem of joints and folds would not be easy to avoid at 100%. And these folds and joints could ruin the beautiful UB Chrome aspect, probably still better than the Molotow, imho:

xxQnzJ.jpg

 

N.B: the strategy of painting would be completely different in case of use of the BMF. Indeed, while I intend to paint first the Chrome bumper and then the body color (the tests of masks removal are however not totally convincing, not only with the Tamiya one, but also with the Tesa, the surface losing a little its beautiful bright aspect, and I will have to decrease the tack in case of use of the Tesa), the BMF would rather have to be applied after the body color.

 

N.B 2: Even if it seems that you can handle the parts painted with Molotow, I strongly recommend to wear gloves or any other solution, to keep the very nice look of this product (I experienced that with one of my samples). 

In the same vein, I don’t recommend to use the Tamiya compounds over the Molotow. Indeed, if you improve a bit the state of surface and the brightness doing so, you also get a different color, darker, turning to a kind of Dark Alu.

 

Cheers

 

Olivier

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Some little improvements, but still a lot to do in this area:

RS3ryt.png

 

The frame must be thinned too... and probably other defects...

 

Thanks for staying in tune and watching.

 

Olivier

 

P.S: I have ordered the S 23 net Aber reference, for my grille...

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Bernard has kindly sent me (to my request) new photos of the radiator and top of radiator grille. The one below is particularly interesting:

 

rzeHd3.jpg

 

In order to give you an idea of the huge work I will have to do there if I want to be quite faithful, I have done a photo on nearly the same angle of view:

ykIZMG.jpg

 

Well, I feel I am at the foot of the Everest, with this build. I begin to be used to clim summits, but this one seems to me very high!!

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A small example: 

Mdcy29.jpg

mLBnzG.png

 

Of course, I will have to simplify a bit in order not to become definitely mad, but such a detail improves the perception of the grille, don't you think?

 

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2 hours ago, Olivier de St Raph said:

Of course, I will have to simplify a bit in order not to become definitely mad,

 

:lol:….no, that happened long ago on the 806 build...…..:D

 

Cheers, H

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Yes, Harvey, you are definitely right: the 806 research and scratch thread... A topic of about 188 pages when I finished the build - without forgetting the predecessor "806 Gangshow" of 44 pages - and that is now more than 200 pages with Hannes build.

After having taken an active part to this topic, you decided to create your own, the H's 806gp full-scratchbuild 1/12, that is now 13 pages... A crazy guys group, really, and a fascinating saga that will remain in my modeler's memory!! :D

 

Cheers, O

 

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Not surprisingly, the internal part of the engine hood is also very basically represented on the AMT. I should have decided to close by glueing this engine hood, things would have been more simple!! ;)

 

UgpSJ0.jpg

 

2mdkHl.jpg

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The AMT instruction sheet suggests to place the battery like this:

yWk5wc.jpg

 

I had noticed it was placed transversally on all engine compartments I could see. As all the latter were restored car's ones, I tried to find a period doc and found this one:

tfx53c.jpg

 

This doc tends to confirm that the AMT battery position is not correct. I will place my battery transversally...

In my research, I could also find these blueprints: the first one is about the 1964 version: the horns are different, but the battery is also placed transversally. I am far from being a specialist in engines, but such documents could be useful for my build...

VqRRyN.jpg

x5JlXe.jpg

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I have begun the assembly of the wheels. Here is a dry fit assembly of the hubcaps, for some comments and a comparison with the photo I made recently (see my post# 56 p.3):

 

lqlFTf.jpg

 

 

 

 

6rANxB.jpg

 

N.B: 1) this wheel above is far from being new, even if it is in quite good condition

2) I have tried to find a better tyre than the AMT one (acceptable though...) , but didn't find anything at such a rare scale, 1/16, on Oupsmodel or Spotmodel. A suggestion? A reference?

3) several options for the black strips: home made decals (from clear ones, I practiced a lot with the Alclad mentions in the P-51 D wheel bays...), masking tape, or Black BMF (very delicate option imho).

 

Thanks for watching and staying in tune anyway.

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Fine tip marker pens might do the job Olivier, I have quite a large selection. Is there a Cultura or large arts and crafts  shop anywhere near you?

 

John

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Hi John,

thanks for your suggestion. If I understand well the marker pens you talk about, I ever have got them, in several sizes (from 0,05 up to 0,4 mm) but I am a bit sceptical on this option, in this case, for several reasons (Chrome support, difficult to get sharp edges mainly).

A trial could be done, however.

 

Olivier

 

P.S: the fine marker pens I suppose you suggested:

zmqRzN.jpg

 

I just made a trial, on plastic and, as I expected, it is not convincing. 

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I have several ' Pilot ' permanent marker pens which have worked reasonably well for wing walk lines in 1/48, but I suppose that it depends what sort of surface you're using it on. 

Sorry it didn't work.

 

John

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No problem, John, I appreciate the intention! :)

Bernard has just sent me new precisions and photos I had asked him. His contribution to my build is huge and I am infinitely grateful to him for the time he spends to help me. I post here only the main documents, but of course he sends me more...

Bernard has confirmed me that the calender grille is not flat, following the shape of the calender.

The width of the frame is 63 mm, meaning about 4 mm at 1/16.

xiW76r.jpg

 

 

ll2udC.jpg

 

Thanks to Bernard, I now know that my frame remains a bit too wide. I will do the correction...

R1bcCg.jpg

 

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I will come-back to my build in a next post (Bernard sent me still new precisions about the grille frame...) but for now, a special post about the Indianapolis Pace car version. 

First, and because I did not recall above the context in which this legendary car was born, here is a little summary from the great book I have ordered (see above), way of remedial course (translation??):

In 1960, Lee Iacocca replaces the austere Robert Mac Namara, who takes up a senior post (secretary of Defense of the USA). Mac Namara had created the very sad Ford Falcon, Lee decides to stop the austerity policy. The Ford cars must reshape their image, in a sense of youth and dynamism. He would create, for the new generation of drivers, a car, more, a concept. It will be the Ford Mustang, and also, through the Total Performance concept, the amazing race car Ford GT 40.

From the beginning of 1964, photos of preproduction copies of the Mustang are circulating in the press.

April 16th, a special program totally dedicated to the Mustang is played on the 3 main TV channels. People are informed that, from the next day, they will be able to go to their Ford dealer, to get a Mustang for only... 2360 $!

A real frenzy seizes American people: 22000 orders in only 1 day...

 

It is in this context that, 1 month later, 2 Convertible Mustang will be used officially as pace car for the famous Indianapolis 500:

JTziMQ.jpg

 

Henry Ford II poses on this photo, installed in the driver’s seat of the Convertible Mustang pace car while the winner of the challenge  will get one as a gift:

8lA0f0.png

 

A limited edition Official Indianapolis 500 pace car of hardtop version is produced, every copy being transmitted to the best Ford dealers. If you have $ 1.099.000  to invest, you can buy one of them on an internet site (most of the 82 photos are great and very interesting for me, completing my library...)

i5Z3Sx.png

71dNuN.png

 

I am not sure I told you that the AMT kit gives the opportunity to build one of these limited edition, thanks to a quite good decal sheet:

85rZOC.jpg

 

Yet, considering I am not building a hardtop version but a convertible one, it means that I could decide to build one of the 2 Indy pace cars...

Well, the decision is not taken, because I also love the Rangoon Red version, but this very special version, all white, with these inscriptions and blue strips, is very tempting!!

 

Pace car and love ;)

 

Olivier

 

P.S: if I refer to the Thibaut Amant « Guide de la Ford Mustang », the name "Mustang" was really inspired by the famous P-51 WWII fighter (p.13 of the book)... 

P.S 2: More infos about this version and the Indy 500 1964 race (terrific accident, 2 dead pilots and several wounded) here:

https://youtu.be/7bgxKr6rLFA

https://youtu.be/3FDlPeNXxcc

https://youtu.be/RBiN2_YvFrg

 

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ZJgz7c.jpg

 

For the record, here is what was the part initially (notice on the real car how this trim strip is fine):

hi7Iu4.png

 

N.B: I should get soon my grille Aber ordered on the Oupsmodel site.

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3BXTT1.jpg

 

For comparison, the wheel of the pace car Mustang. Notice the very small inscription Firestone 500 and the off white strip on the tyre sidewall.

vtFgrC.jpg

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A tip for the future Olivier....if you need to paint on a chromed or painted surface....and your wheels fit that scenario exactly....matt varnish them first....which provides a 'tooth' for the other paint to grab onto...and means the coverage is improved.

Paint the details (stripes in this case)...then re-seal the piece with satin or gloss varnish.

This also allows you to better control the 'shine' on the piece...which adds to the final realism.

 

Regards

 

Ron

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44 minutes ago, silver911 said:

A tip for the future Olivier....if you need to paint on a chromed or painted surface....and your wheels fit that scenario exactly....matt varnish them first....which provides a 'tooth' for the other paint to grab onto...and means the coverage is improved.

Paint the details (stripes in this case)...then re-seal the piece with satin or gloss varnish.

 

Thanks Ron for this tip. Though I must say that, to my own surprise, my enamel paint had no problem to grab on the AMT Chrome.

I could also have first removed the Chrome (like I did for the front bumper) but considering the challenge it is to get the same Chrome effect (even with the Molotow), I decided here to just use the Molotow pencil to re-chrome the small portions where it had been erased and sanded (sprue attaching points).

More, applying a coat of mat varnish on the whole hubcap would have probably altered a bit this Chrome aspect (even applying at the end a gloss varnish) so difficult to get.

So, your tip is certainly very good in most of the cases, but here, I am not sure the result would have been better.

Well, when I made this trial, I was not sure at all of the result, and I thought: if it doesn't work, no problem, a short bath of the part in the white spirit US tank will remove gently the black paint, and I will try another solution.

But finally, I am not dissatisfied with the result (the above close-up is merciless but at naked eye, it is not bad at all), even if, after drying of this first coat, I will probably try to improve it, with a second coat of black and maybe small corrections with the Molotow 1 mm Chrome pen.

 

Regards

 

Olivier

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