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Olivier de St Raph

Ford Mustang 1964 1/2 Convertible 1/16 from the Coupe AMT kit: the Indy 500 Pace Car

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Thanks a lot, Marco. I suppose this powder is nearly the same than the Magic Powder.

Now the question remains: what is the best option for the bumpers? 

Have you tried this C1 powder yourself?

Well, here is another interesting video about the same product:

It seems to give very good results, not depending so much on the color applied as primer (unlike the Alclad Chrome), especially if you apply a second coat of powder.

It seems to be resistant to masking tape removal, not needing any Clear to protect it and not being a problem with fingerprints. To confirm...

As with every other options, the result will depend widely on the quality of the support, that should be gloss and smooth.

Now difficult to compare on videos the Chrome mirror effect you get with such a method compared with Alclad, with Molotow LC and with a pro plating service.

It must be added that this powder will imho not be adapted to apply on complicated surfaces, as rims fe...

I will be back home tonight and will go on with trials tomorrow.

 

Cheers

 

Olivier

 

P.S: I have ordered the C1 powder and will compare it as soon as I get it with the Alclad and Molotow LC options.

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So far I only tried the powder on some small parts, which was may be a mistake, because it's very difficult to polish to get the effect in the tiny corners. But the bumpers in 1/16 are

somehow bigger

Cheers

Marco F.

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Hello,

I am back home. A lot to do after holidays (homework, garden...), but I could however go on a bit with my build. I have completely removed the too big inscriptions (in relief) on the AMT tyres (see my post# 115 on p. 5). It was a long and patient job (2 sides on 4 tyres), first with a curved blade, then with sanding paper and Micromesh. I am not yet totally satisfied with the result for now. I will post photos as soon as I am, tomorrow I hope...

 

qzLJLH.png

 

N.B: if decals can be placed with no problem on such a soft surface, it could also be the best solution to represent the partial white side... 

 

Olivier

 

Edit: I just made a trial of decal placing on my soft tyre, and it seems to be OK (good adhesion of the decal). More as soon as possible...

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I have just applied the Microscale Liquid Decal Film on my printed Indy 500 wheels: I should use the central logo, the white strip and maybe, if possible, the Old Gold line and Firestone 500 inscription (tiny). Hope it will be all right... 

 

rsF41a.jpg

Edited by Olivier de St Raph
adding

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I wonder if the white strip will work with Clear virgin decal (because the printer can't as it seems print the white color). I know Holi sells also white versions, maybe I will have to order a set (I only used the Clear up to now. If any of you have experienced this question, thanks for sharing...

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I was very busy these last days so few time for model making. But I could however go on with the tyre job:

XfVdGW.jpg

 

P.S: I have received the very beautiful book: Mustang: reflets d'une légende, with plenty of gorgeous photos by Hubert Hainault, ETAI ed., that I highly recommend to any fan of the Pony car. The first chapter is dedicated to a wonderful Coupe 1964 1/2 in Wimbledon White, a very useful reference for my Indy 500 Convertible...

I got too the copy of the n° 289 Retroviseur issue (see below), very interesting too...

 

i4cIUt.jpg

 

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The decal option didn't work for the Old Gold line and for the Firestone 500 inscription. So I had to do them freehand (the line for now) with the Vallejo 878 Old Gold and a fine paintbrush (Winsor and Newton Series 7) . I learnt from Juan Manuel the many advantages of the Vallejo acrylics, allowing to do small corrections that will remain invisible one dry. 

I found out another one by myself, which is that it is one of the rare paints that may be applied on a soft support, like my tyres, while it gets sticky with most of them... 

kywzHT.jpg

 

Well, the result is not perfect (craftwork), I still have small corrections to do (this close-up will help) and the inscriptions are a bit too big, but, unless someone gives me a hint for a better result, I will accept it as a compromise.

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A new little step on the wheels, with the white strips, made from Holi White decal sheet. one of the hardest thing was to determine precisely the inner and outer diameter of these strips, and to cut them as welle as possible, with a compass cutter. The Microscale Liquid Decal Film was used to make these custom decals.

All is not perfect, I will have corrections to do and a light weathering on the too white strips with Vallejo paints and my paintbrush...

 

kcEDlU.jpg

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The Retroviseur 289 issue learnt me a lot of things about the first versions of the Mustang (1964 1/2 to 1966). Here are below the technical features including the several engines and transmissions available in that period.

The standard engine in 1964 was the 101 hp 6-cyl. of 170 ci (U code)

Optionally, the engines available were:

- the 164 hp V8 of 260ci (F code)

- the 210 hp V8 of 289 ci (D code)

- and the High Performance 271 hp V8 of 289 ci (K code).

Let's recall that the Indy 500 pace car was equipped with the latter, as ever mentioned above.

 

nfznVd.jpg

 

A very interesting buying guide brings also many useful infos for the ones who would like to buy such a version of the Mustang...

 

And I ever said above how the Hubert Hainault book was beautiful, he is a great photographer and a Mustang fan. I should try to contact him, he lives not far from me (less than 50 kms), to inform him of my project. Maybe he could bring me some more infos and photos, especially about the 4 barrels 289 HP engine.

 

Olivier

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That's a great job you did on the wheels Olivier.

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I have improved the white strips by applying an Off White Vallejo (820 and a hint of Desert Yellow 977) over the decals. I recall that the rims and hubcaps are just dry fit assembled for now:

 

Hg4wOI.jpg

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The AMT 3 point stars are a not so bad base. Of course, they need to be prepared and improved to be quite faithful to the original ones:

1) I had to remove the nice AMT Chrome in order to get a better shape and to remove the moulding marks. As for the bumpers, it is a pity to have to remove the AMT Chrome, which is really nice, but no choice if I wanted to get better shapes and clean parts...

 

UgnD8J.jpg

 

The center of these parts is wrong. I used a 3,2 die (Punch and die RP Toolz) and 0,2 mm thickness acétate sheet to get a wider center part, on which I will try to place decals at the right size... I first used the Molotow LC on these stars, but I removed the paint and for now applied Polished alu and then Chrome Alclad. I love the Alclad for their incredible grain, but I admit I would like more shiny parts. Maybe I should have applied a thin gloss black base instead of the Polished alu. And it is probably what I will do...

In addition, I am a bit disappointed by the Molotow. Unless it is me who don't use it properly, I think you need to apply a quite thick coat to get the Chrome effect, and so you loose details and the result is not so good. I tried to contact Molotow on their site to get hints but didn't get any reply. Maybe Hannes, who is German, could help me, as Molotow is a german brand...

 

Hf0fdf.jpg

 

Among the docs used as reference for this area, there is this amazing close-up, taken from the H. Hainault book ever mentioned above (of course, I will remove this photo from my thread if the author asks me to do so). Notice the very fine engraving (red arrow), that I tried to represent by using a 240 grit paper:

3BQBrI.jpg

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Dear Olivier , sorry  I don´t have a clue if this manufacturer is interested in the  improvement of his  product or wants to give advices .

But I have another suggestion: Have you ever heared about the silvering technique ? About  25 years ago I bought a kit by a manufaturer named Hi- Q . I don´t know if this company still exists and I never used it , it´s still in my stash .In Germany  this technique is known as " Silbrieren "

You can achieve chrome , silver , gold , brass and copper effects and also  add every color you like .

It´s a quite complicated procedure and you must wear rubber gloves .But the result is what matters .

The adress is ( was ? ) HI-Q Enterprises GmbH , 2401 Ratekau ; Bahnhofstr. 5. I´ll post an advertisement slip of paper in the next hours.

Many greetings !  Hannes

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From this close-up, screen capture of a video on You Tube, I am gonna reproduce the wheel central logo:

1WF84d.png

 

After several trials to get the right size, I get the 3,2 mm diameter logo, that I print on the White virgin decal:

buWwfP.jpg

 

I have just applied the Microscale LDF and should be able to place the printed logo today.

 

More soon...

 

P.S: thanks Hannes for this tip, I don't know if this brand still exists, but I ever have several options (Alclad, Molotow and now C1 Metallizer powder, that I got 2 days ago). I will think about another option if I can't get a convincing result with the latter.

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I am glad with the 3 point stars I could get: the Chrome Alclad has been applied on a Gloss Black base, giving a good shine. I like the fine engraving I could get with the 240 grit sanding paper, and the decal reproduces quite well the logo. I have applied a thin coat of Klear Kote Gloss Alclad on the latter. My hubcaps are OK now or nearly so (looking at the photo below, I see that I have small corrections to do with the 1 mm Molotow LC pencil, on the outside part of the hubcaps):

 

eItpsp.jpg

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The last corrections have been brought. Here are my wheels with their hubcaps now over. It will have been a hard job to get this result, but I am glad with it, and it is what matters...

Of course, this is maybe just 1% of the final build, there will be a lot to do and several months (1 year??) to get the model of my dreams...

 

kvZK7x.jpg

 

P.S: this is still a dry fit assembly (but the 3 point stars are now glued on the hubcaps) and some details are missing, like the inflating nipples (my next step)...

In addition, the tyres sides are too shiny, I will apply a coat of Vallejo satin varnish on them.

Edited by Olivier de St Raph

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vafhe8.jpg

 

I am sure you know the answer: no primer, no paint and no varnish!! Only polishing and buffing, with the Alclad Micromesh and the Tamiya compounds!!

This technique, the most simple, could be the best solution for my body...

ASC5md.jpg

 

If I use this solution for my body « painting », what is very probable, the challenge will be to get the same mirror effect even on hollows, reliefs and complex areas, while the polishing and buffing techniques were applied here on a wide and flat surface...

 

N.B: the Tamiya LP43 is a nice pearl paint, but does not correspond to the Wimbledon White.

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2 interesting details on the screen capture below:

- the hole in the hub cap and the inflating nipple: I have done the holes with a 0,8 mm drill. I will use a 0,58 mm diameter Evergreen plastic rod to represent the nipple. The lenght of the latter must be about 30 mm at 1/1 (including about 12 mm of cap) in its visible portion but must be a bit longer to let it go through the hole. I will cut a 2,5 mm portion of rod.

- the lead balancing, to add

QLjpuD.png

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On 10/09/2018 at 07:09, Olivier de St Raph said:

N.B: the Tamiya LP43 is a nice pearl paint, but does not correspond to the Wimbledon White.

Hi Olivier, maybe you could try to order a can of automotive paint. A quick search gives me Ford FW2AWHA Wimbledon White and Ford 7341 Wimbledon White as options here. Of course, I have no idea if this would match your desired colour but I may be worth a try. 

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Testors, in the Model Master range, sells Wimbledon White (1964) in spray cans #28132.  There are multiple vendors selling touch-up paints for full-size Mustangs. Duplicolor, I believe, is one that is available in Europe and is available through Amazon in Europe.

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Thanks a lot, Jeroens and mdesaxe (welcome on the thread), I will think about your suggestions, but I admit that the "no paint" option is very tempting, as far as the AMT sprues match very well (I suppose they made it deliberately) with the Wimbledon White (it is less creamy than what the 2nd pic of my post#171 suggests). I am really not sure I will get a better result with a painting option... But maybe I will order the Testors #28132, as a reference...

 

Cheers

 

Olivier

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