Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Sign in to follow this  
Oberleutnant

Help! Building Eduard Resin Propeller Kit

Recommended Posts

Hi folks,

 

I am new to the hobby and recently purchased an aftermarket Eduard Brassin propeller kit for my BF109 G-6.

 

It has come in sections ready to build however the base of the propeller is connected to one large lump of plastic.

 

How am I supposed to get the base of the propeller off this lump of plastic? (see photos).

 

Surely I don't have to take a knife and slice it apart? There are no prep instructions.

 

Seems crazy to me for what is supposed to be an easy to construct set.

 

Its not an error in the kit.

 

This is probably obvious to you guys but it seems illogical to me.

 

I would appreciate some advice please if you guys wouldn't mind.

 

Only the top bit of this solid lump is required:

 

20180611_082229

 

20180611_082049

 

Looks nothing like this!

20180611_082255

 

Presume this is sliced off too and sanded down:

 

20180611_082110

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These are the resin pour blocks that are used to both attach the part to the base of the original mould, and to give the part a reservoir of resin to fill the parts during casting.  What you need is the finest saw you possess (a razor saw is best, but only if you have one), and to cut off the base from the plate as closely as you can (preferably with the base held in a vice), then sand it flat to the edge of the detail.  Take it slowly and rotate the part a few times to make sure your cut isn't wandering into the detail, as that would be a very bad thing :owww:

 

If you have a Dremel or similar you can use a cutting disc to remove the bulk and a sanding drum to get near to the finished depth.  Wear a particle mask in a well-ventilated space though, as any fine dust can be bad for your lungs.

 

The prop spinner should be easy to cut with some nips, leaving a bit sticking out so that you can sand it back to the profile of the spinner.  Little and often, and squirt some primer over it to check your work, adjusting as necessary :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The lumps attached to the spinner and prop base are what is known as casting blocks which enable the originals to be completely covered with resin and still able to be handled.

 

Ha, Mike beat me to it, and far more clearly than me.

 

Good luck  and welcome to the mysterious world of resin.

 

Rog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks gents for the replies.

 

What total and utter overkill for a propeller!

 

If I'd known I would not have bought the kit.

 

I don't have the tools and without a clamp am liable to slice my fingers off with just the scalpel. 

 

Sigh.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Oberleutnant said:

I don't have the tools and without a clamp am liable to slice my fingers off with just the scalpel. 

 

In that case, grab the harshest grit sandpaper you own, and sit down for a sanding session.  Keep checking where you're up to, and providing you don't nod off during the process (remember dust protection), change to a finer grit and then a fine finishing grit when you're just about there.

 

In truth, you need to have a bit of a tool kit accumulated to deal with resin casting blocks (especially the big ones), and you're possibly approaching resin a little too early in your modelling career? :shrug: It's important not to overstretch yourself with too much new at once, so perhaps skip the resin props & such for a wee while until you've grown in confidence a little.  Also, look out for a razor saw, as they're a really useful tool in general.  If any of that sounds condescending, please accept my apologies, as it wasn't meant to :yes: 

 

As a post-script, I've used Eduard resin props before, and they are excellent, as they bring the ultimate in detail, but you must consider them worth the money for your project of course :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Mike said:

 

In that case, grab the harshest grit sandpaper you own, and sit down for a sanding session.  Keep checking where you're up to, and providing you don't nod off during the process (remember dust protection), change to a finer grit and then a fine finishing grit when you're just about there.

 

In truth, you need to have a bit of a tool kit accumulated to deal with resin casting blocks (especially the big ones), and you're possibly approaching resin a little too early in your modelling career? :shrug: It's important not to overstretch yourself with too much new at once, so perhaps skip the resin props & such for a wee while until you've grown in confidence a little.  Also, look out for a razor saw, as they're a really useful tool ini general.  If any of that sounds condescending, please accept my apologies, as it wasn't meant to :yes: 

 

As a post-script, I've used Eduard resin props before, and they are excellent, as they bring the ultimate in detail, but you must consider them worth the money for your project of course :)

Thanks mate, very helpful and not condescending.

 

I agree this is probably a bit too early for me.

 

I chose to buy this because the prop which came with the kit I painted the wrong colour so I thought I'd buy this kit and simply put it together and paint!

 

I might have a look at sanding the paint off the existing propeller as my primary option.

 

I didn't want to add any more coats as I've already got too many and its covering the detail.

 

Not much detail can be seen from this picture but its the propeller I've looked to replace.

 

20180602_093048

 

Just the wrong colour and looks pants.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could always strip it?  If it's acrylic soak it in some Isopropyl Alcohol (IPA), or oven cleaner.  You can use the latter to attempt to remove enamel paint too.  Put it in a bag and leave it for a number of hours to melt that paint :)

 

Shame it's the wrong scheme, as you made a good job of the demarcation ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can I suggest you don't despair.

 

While the difference between the kit prop and the resin version may be insignificant [I don't know, I haven't seen them to compare], when your skills improve to the extent of  seeking to improve wheel wells or cockpits with resin, you will notice some significant improvements.

 

As Mike suggests, a razor saw is a valuable part of any modellers armoury and has uses beyond fettling resin, and they are not expensive. Mine is over 30 years old and is only on its third blade, and despite only returning to the hobby a few years ago, I have used it on kits completely of resin.

 

I had to walk before I could run with all this new stuff, but with encouragement from fellow modellers, including from BM, I have been able to tackle aspects of modelling previously completely foreign to me.

 

Good luck and keep at it !!

 

Rog 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, Mike said:

You could always strip it?  If it's acrylic soak it in some Isopropyl Alcohol (IPA), or oven cleaner.  You can use the latter to attempt to remove enamel paint too.  Put it in a bag and leave it for a number of hours to melt that paint :)

 

Shame it's the wrong scheme, as you made a good job of the demarcation ;)

Cheers,

 

Yeah I had a couple of goes at masking but the lines did surprise me!

 

I'm using Vallejo water based acrylics.

 

Will the product you mentioned strip this do you know?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Oberleutnant said:

Will the product you mentioned strip this do you know?

It certainly should do, yes.  Mr Muscle oven cleaner is the stuff I use.  Pop the prop in a ziplok bag, squirt that nasty stuff all over it (watch the fumes), and do up the bag.  Put it somewhere safe for a couple of hours (in the sink so if it leaks it's ok), and then get it out.  You might need to loosen some of the paint with a toothbrush (an old one), and it might possibly need another go, but it should bring it off without damaging the plastic underneath.  Rinse it thoroughly in water to neutralise the chemical as the last action :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Mike said:

It certainly should do, yes.  Mr Muscle oven cleaner is the stuff I use.  Pop the prop in a ziplok bag, squirt that nasty stuff all over it (watch the fumes), and do up the bag.  Put it somewhere safe for a couple of hours (in the sink so if it leaks it's ok), and then get it out.  You might need to loosen some of the paint with a toothbrush (an old one), and it might possibly need another go, but it should bring it off without damaging the plastic underneath.  Rinse it thoroughly in water to neutralise the chemical as the last action :)

Lovely, thanks mate.

 

I'm sure I've got some oven cleaner somewhere I can use.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We now need you to report back ;)

 

Once you've got 100 posts, you can always move the resin prop on to another member, or just hang onto it until you've got the tools to do it justice :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×