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ShipbuilderMN

Iron barque - 25 feet to 1 inch - Scratchbuilt

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Completed this monring.   Completely hand-built.     Took 84 hours (timed on a stopwatch) Spread over 53 days.   Note:   The "gunports" were just decoration, painted on, they did not open, they did not conceal guns - she was a merchant ship - cargo only!

Bob

1_Complete_Medium.jpg

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Another absolutely beautiful model Bob, wonderful craftsmanship!

 

Keith

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Absolutely fantastic again Bob!

 

Can you please give me an idea on how you do the sails? I am stuck on a build I have been trying to do!

 

All the best,

 

Ray

 

 

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Perfection in miniature! Stunning.

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Beautiful model of a beautiful ship presented on a beautiful sea. A joy to behold!

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The sails are just white airmail paper (obtained from Ebay), molded round an ostrich egg when wet.   Dried with a small hobby heat gun.   Nothing worse than a flat sail or flag - Bob  

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34 minutes ago, ShipbuilderMN said:

The sails are just white airmail paper (obtained from Ebay), molded round an ostrich egg when wet.   Dried with a small hobby heat gun.   Nothing worse than a flat sail or flag - Bob  

Brilliant, thanks for that Bob, it gives me a bit of a clue now!

 

Ray

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Ostrich eggs can be found on Ebay, but if too expensive, a shiny plastic ball will work, but less choice of curves.   Pat damp sail to egg or ball, place handkerchief over it and hold it tight at back to dry out with heat gun or other heat source.

Bob

 

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29 minutes ago, ShipbuilderMN said:

Ostrich eggs can be found on Ebay, but if too expensive, a shiny plastic ball will work, but less choice of curves.   Pat damp sail to egg or ball, place handkerchief over it and hold it tight at back to dry out with heat gun or other heat source.

Bob

 

Thanks again Bob. Kev (@longshanks) has just also helped me out, and guided me to your website where you do a download for sailing ships- I should have thought about that before, as I already had your download of Glenmoor and Kenya I humbly apologise! I have now downloaded it.

 

Ray

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Not only seriously good bit of modelling but amazing that it took only 84 hours.  The rigging alone would have taken me that long!

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The rigging is the easiset part, as it is wire, and there are no knots anywhere - it is just glued on in short lengths!

Bob

 

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Wonderful, I love the plinth as well, it completes the work. Also including the pen to give the size is a great idea.

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Thanks,

It is safely inside a display case now.    Sadly, most model shipbuilders convince themselves they can't build anything like this on account of the rigging when, as I have said many times, that is the easiest part of it.      I am the other way round now, I know I could never build a kit, too big, too expensive, and too many about.    When I changed over from 8 feet to 1 inch to 32 feet to 1 inch years ago, I was surprised at how easy and convenient it was, and could never face taking on a large one these days - they take too long!

Bob

 

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Bob, your models never cease to amaze me.

Your attention to detail is astounding and your finishing is certainly a hallmark of your work

May I enquire about the attractive edging to the "water"? 

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Thanks,

It is nothing more than twisted 24swg enamelled copper wire.     I take twice the length required, and double it over.   Place the doubled ends in a vice and the other ends in a hand drill, winding away until the twist is tight enough.   It is glued on with contact adhesive, and covers the sea/wood edging nicely.

Bob

 

 

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Another absolutely cracking job Bob, i just love to see your models.

 

All the best Chris

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Hello,
This work belongs to the goldsmith 's art.
That's wonderful.
It's 3D poetry.
Marc

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4 hours ago, ShipbuilderMN said:

Thanks,

It is nothing more than twisted 24swg enamelled copper wire.     I take twice the length required, and double it over.   Place the doubled ends in a vice and the other ends in a hand drill, winding away until the twist is tight enough.   It is glued on with contact adhesive, and covers the sea/wood edging nicely.

Bob

 

 

Thanks for that Bob. 

I really like that idea,  it's such a simple but very effective finishing detail to add to an already beautiful model. 

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Thanks - Sold today, and will shortly be setting off for its European destination - Bob   

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More stunning work Bob,always a pleasure to see these  beauties.

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