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Help for a newcomer to weathering


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Hi guys! So I've just got back into modelling following more than a decade away, working on a 1/32 Super Hornet and finally at the weathering stage. This, however, is the first time I've tried weathering (it wasn't something I probably even knew existed as a teenager..) and safe to say it's all just a bit confusing for me at the moment. So I was really hoping I could get some help with some fairly basic questions, as there is just so much (and conflicting) information out there. Can't say how many Youtube videos I've watched at this point.

 

So.. One of the main effects I'm looking for is the dirty streaking of air running along the airframe that you can see, particularly the flaps area and out of panels as I'm going for an operational carrier look. So I got some Vallejo Model Wash (dark grey), applied it over a good coat of Future/Pledge, let it dry for 20 minutes or so... problem is, using either a cotton bud or tissue it either doesn't come off entirely or the whole thing comes off. I just can't seem to get the 'streaking' effect that other people do. It doesn't 'run' backwards when i rub it, it just disappears. What could I be doing wrong? Is it the wrong product? Do you have any other/better tips for achieving that streaking effect? They make it look so easy in videos, haha.

 

Any help or links to good sources of info would be really appreciated!

 

 

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18 minutes ago, LooseSeal said:

Is it the wrong product?

Dry pigments, enamels or oil colour would suit this type of weathering better than the Vallejo wash. Once the Vallejo is dry, it’s pretty much permanent!

 

Or have a butchers’ at this lads videos, some pretty good weathering effects.

 

Mart

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For this effect i use a wash. I place it on and pull the brush in the direction of airflow. Then i use water to soften the effect. The biggest trick with weathering is to remember subtlety. Less is more and you can always add. Hard to take away if you put to much on.

      I also use black ink for streaks. I use a high quality draftsmen pen or calligraphers pen. I place a drop of ink and let it sit about 20-30 seconds. Take a brush lightly dipped in isopropyl alcohol so its damp not dripping, and pull the ink back in the direction of airflow. You can leave it as light or dark as you want. A third option is dry weathering with powdered pastel charcoal and chalk. If its ground down into a fine dust (labor & practice intensive but worth the effect) it can be used to simulate dirt, dust, exhaust, and various other stains.  

 

Dennis

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Thanks guys! Work took over for a while but eventually got back to it. I got myself some pigments and experimented with that. Turned out I could get the effect I wanted with the pigments thinned better than putting them on dry, and reasonably happy with the result given it's my first attempt at weathering!

 

Another (unrelated) question if anyone could humour me... My final thing to finish is the canopy. The problem is there was a pretty ghastly mold line running down it, which I have attempted to remove using one of those multi-step nail files from Boots (had heard they were good for this). Unfortunately, no matter what I do, I cannot get the canopy clear. The line is gone, at least, but for the life of me I cannot get the scratches out. Have tried putting on coats of Future, but it hasn't really helped much. Any ideas?

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Hello @LooseSeal ... Are you brushing the klear on ? If yes try dipping the canopy 100% under in a tub or glass jar. Then letting it dry in a warm dry dust free area. I use a plastic tub for drying with varying pieces of sprue to float the canopy. Step one : Dip canopy, Step two: using tweezers wick excess klear off on a kitchen paper towel. Step three: place in plastic Tub to dry for at leadt 24 hours. Step four: repeat once or twice. I do this and occasionally will have a slight blurry area but nothing else to indicate anything was done to the canopy. 

 

Dennis

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Sadly I have been dipping it, even a few times, but to no avail... A little bit nervous about sanding it all back again to try to eliminate the scratches, but I guess I might have to. I'll let you know how I get on!

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Thank you @Tony Oliver ! I'm going to order some of the micromesh and see how that goes. 

 

I've never used polishing compounds before though. Did a bit of Googling on it... is there any specific colour of compound you would use for clear parts?

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5 hours ago, LooseSeal said:

I've never used polishing compounds before though. Did a bit of Googling on it... is there any specific colour of compound you would use for clear parts

 

Hi, I use the tamiya polishing compounds. 

 

They do three - coarse, fine & finish. 

 

I think they were mainly designed for polishing their TS spray paint, as in 1/24 car bodies. However they work great on clear parts too. 

 

Do a google search mate a few places sell them, either individually or as the set of three 

 

https://www.emodels.co.uk/tamiya-polishing-compound-finish-87070.html

 

 

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A cheaper alternative to polishing compound is white toothpaste used on a cloth with a drop or two of water.   

 

Works well for me anyway.

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I found a pretty good deal on all 3 Tamiya polishing compounds plus the applicator cloths for about £27 on ebay. Coming from Hong Kong though, so will probably take a few weeks to arrive!

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 6/16/2018 at 3:49 PM, Gorby said:

A cheaper alternative to polishing compound is white toothpaste used on a cloth with a drop or two of water.   

 

Works well for me anyway.

+1    toothpaste works for me as well, and easy to nick from the bathroom!

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On 6/16/2018 at 3:49 PM, Gorby said:

A cheaper alternative to polishing compound is white toothpaste used on a cloth with a drop or two of water.   

 

This works very well. You can also vary the polishing cloth for more or less scratch removal. Start with a piece of denim, finish with cotton tee shirt.

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Another vote for the tamiya polishing compounds, they are fantastic but incredibly hard to find in the UK.  I had to buy my set from Hong Kong and Japan.

 

You can also try car polish, most contain some cutting compounds to polish out micro scratches on car paint. I’ve also used a paint cutting compound from Halfords, it’s similar to T Cut but in a paste, it comes in a yellow tube and is really cheap.

 

Brasso metal polish is another alternative, I have used this years ago with good effect, but make sure you try on scrap plastic first for any of the products first so you don’t totally ruin the canopy.

 

 

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