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Heather Kay

1/72 Fairey Rotodyne: Heather relives her childhood!

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On 6/6/2018 at 7:22 PM, Heather Kay said:

I suppose it took me about half an hour or so to mask all the glazing here. I used MEK to wick around the frame inside the fuselage

Hi,

I'm reading this one with interest. A quick question if I may? What s MEK and what do you mean by 'wick around the frame'  What does this do for you?

 

Sorry if it's a dumb Q.

 

Regards

MM

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1 hour ago, missile-monkey said:

Hi,

I'm reading this one with interest. A quick question if I may? What s MEK and what do you mean by 'wick around the frame'  What does this do for you?

 

Sorry if it's a dumb Q.

 

Regards

MM

I asked the same question, and got answers, half way down Page 3....and I thought it a good question...🤔😉

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, missile-monkey said:

Sorry if it's a dumb Q

They say the only dumb questions are those that don’t get asked.

 

I used the term “wick” to describe the action of the solvent being drawn into the space between the transparency and the fuselage. As with most models, the transparency was moulded with a ledge round it to hold it in place in the hole. By gently pushing down on the transparent part, and loading a brush with the solvent, just touching the brush to the edge of the transparency let the solvent flow all around to give a firm hold.

 

I hope that makes sense. 

Edited by Heather Kay

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1 hour ago, PLC1966 said:

I asked the same question, and got answers, half way down Page 3....and I thought it a good question...🤔😉

Found it...Just shortly after I asked the Q....Doh.....

 

MM

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On 6/12/2018 at 7:18 AM, Heather Kay said:

Spot on. I was worried that the windows wouldn't be attached well, as various builders report unfortunate incidents with glazing being accidentally pushed into the fuselage. As each window was fitted, I carefully applied a little finger pressure to it and touched a brush loaded with solvent to the edge. I could see the colour vary ever so slightly as the fluid wicked around the window, so I could see if the stuff had got all round it. Sometimes I needed to add a drop more solvent to ensure there was contact all round the piece of glazing and the fuselage. Hope that makes more sense.

Sorry to be a pain and distract you from this brilliant build......but if you use a lot of the solvent doesn't it cloud the transparencies?   It does on mine..!!

 

Regards

MM

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Just now, missile-monkey said:

Sorry to be a pain and distract you from this brilliant build......but if you use a lot of the solvent doesn't it cloud the transparencies?   It does on mine..!!

I suppose the solvent you use might have a bearing. In my case I used MEK, and only applied it to the edges where the transparency touched the plastic of the fuselage. I could see the solvent get sucked into the gap by the change in colour as it happened.

 

It only needs a careful touch with the tip of the loaded brush. No need to wipe the brush around the transparency, just dab it so the solvent is drawn out and into the space. It's a darned sight easier to do than to describe!

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13 minutes ago, Heather Kay said:

I suppose the solvent you use might have a bearing. In my case I used MEK, and only applied it to the edges where the transparency touched the plastic of the fuselage. I could see the solvent get sucked into the gap by the change in colour as it happened.

 

It only needs a careful touch with the tip of the loaded brush. No need to wipe the brush around the transparency, just dab it so the solvent is drawn out and into the space. It's a darned sight easier to do than to describe!

Thank you....

 

MM

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Hi Heather, I followed your build whilst away on holiday using my ladies iPad. Great work indeed. Your either very bravy or foolhardy? I tried to build this kit a few years ago. It resides on the shelf of doom!

 

Colin

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1 hour ago, heloman1 said:

Your either very bravy or foolhardy?

Definitely foolhardy! I’m usually up for a challenge - witness my attempt at cobbling a Revell kit into an Airfix kit to make a plane that’s already kitted by someone. I must be mad! :drunk:

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On 12/06/2018 at 16:47, Heather Kay said:

There are times when you really think "what the heck am I doing". I nearly had one of those. Actually, no, that's wrong. I did have one of those. It was right around this moment...

With large transfers, of a certain age, I thought it sensible to start small. 

 

On 12/06/2018 at 17:59, stevehnz said:

Heather, re your decals, Microscale Liquid Decal Film is excellent piece of mind on old maybe dodgy decals. It does a great job of keeping things together without making them too stiff.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/MicroScale-Industries-Liquid-Decal-Film/dp/B06XNZ8Y3H

Sorry if I'm preaching to the converted.

Steve.

I was overly optimistic with the Comet transfers from 1963 but was well warned...now I'll go and get the right tools for the job. Thanks again. Mike

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