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Models of Trams (streetcars) made by Barry and Colin. All are completely scratch built, to the scale of 1:32 and run on 45mm track (handlaid using HO rail with the sleepers removed  and the base built up to represent street scenes.),not garden railway track.

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Barry, your pics seem to be missing?

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Hi Barry,

 

Right spot 👍but as JeroenS says the pictures haven’t come through. 🙁

 

Getting there though 👍. I’m looking forward to seeing these.

 

Steve

 

 

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Posted (edited)

IMG_0107.JPGPosted Friday at 16:07 (edited)
My model of a Christchurch double deck tram as built 1905. The trolley pole had been removed when this photo was taken. Usually the model appears after the original was built, but in this case the model came first! It was then used to persuade the unbelievers how the seating should be arranged on No 26 at Ferrymead. 

This is a good example of scratch building! The trolley standard is the barrel of a ball point pen, the netting around the top deck is a length of fly screen netting as used on a flyscreen door! and the windows are cut from a soft drink bottle with straight sides. Stairs were cut from a block of customwood with a fret saw. The pole (not shown) was made from a double-butted bike spoke and fitted with a trolley head and base. Wheels are the correct scale size. The truck side frames were made from two excellent patterns carved by Colin. These were embedded in plastersene and hardened in the freezer (don't tell mum!) over night. Next morning the patterns were removed from the moulds to be replaced with builders bog. The result is a set of 14D5  side frames to match the full size originals. Unfortunately the aprons are still missing their wooden tops. I think the driver has escaped to have a cuppa.

The model runs very nicely and will tow a trailer.

Edited by Barry Marchant
add pic

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Nice build.  What do you use to power it?  Driven bogies I guess but adapted axels for the new rack gauge?

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Nice work Barry - that photo came through fine. Some more like that one please!

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Looks great, even better when you consider it moves under it's own steam (as it were).

 

I don't know a lot about the Christchurch tram system (it wasn't running when I was out there), but do they ever run the old trams such as these or is it just new stuff?

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13 hours ago, bar side said:

Nice build.  What do you use to power it?  Driven bogies I guess but adapted axels for the new rack gauge?

Hi bar side, one truck is powered, on 1 axle by a Mashima 12 volt motor through a worm and pinion obtained from North Yard based in Blenheim NZ (see their catalog) The axles are 3mm bright steel bar purchased in long lengths and cut to length (1 15/16in )

Insulated wheels are fitted with a 10mm nylon bush drilled 3mm while still in the lathe and the axle pressed in.

Live wheels are turned with a bush on the inside which is drilled and tapped for a grub screw Meccano style

Track gauge is 45mm or 1.75 inches (gauge 1) but MUCH finer than garden railway track.

Pickup is from the rails of course.

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2 hours ago, Spiny said:

Looks great, even better when you consider it moves under it's own steam (as it were).

 

I don't know a lot about the Christchurch tram system (it wasn't running when I was out there), but do they ever run the old trams such as these or is it just new stuff?

Hello Spiny, if you google for Christchurch Trams, or Ferrymead Tramway you should get a lot of leads.

Both tramways are a 'must see' if you visit us. There are no 'new' trams' in Christchurch, several have been rebuilt completely from abandond wrecks.

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Posted (edited)

b-010.jpgThe side of the tram says it all! The original is a Melbourne W2 considerably modified inside and painted in this striking colour scheme. It does daily meal trips around the city circuit most evenings and a booking for a meal is essential.The power truck has both axles powered. Working headlights and side lights are fitted and powered with a 9 volt battery hidden in the kitchen area. This model, made by Barry can run on either Colin's or my layout.

The truck side frames are Chch Brill 77e castings. They should be Melbourne No 1 or 1a but I do not know where to source them. Help welcomed on this matter

Edited by Barry Marchant

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20 hours ago, Barry Marchant said:

Hello Spiny, if you google for Christchurch Trams, or Ferrymead Tramway you should get a lot of leads.

Both tramways are a 'must see' if you visit us. There are no 'new' trams' in Christchurch, several have been rebuilt completely from abandond wrecks.

Thanks, just had a look and that would have been great while playing tourist. But even more than that, it's great to see in the photos that the city seems to be recovering from the quakes.

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Looks great Barry! Like you say, a really striking colour scheme. I’ve been on this one also. Spent an evening in the restaurant car in 2008, a really good night out. 👍

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On 5/21/2018 at 12:38 AM, Barry Marchant said:

Hi bar side, one truck is powered, on 1 axle by a Mashima 12 volt motor through a worm and pinion obtained from North Yard based in Blenheim NZ (see their catalog) The axles are 3mm bright steel bar purchased in long lengths and cut to length (1 15/16in )

Insulated wheels are fitted with a 10mm nylon bush drilled 3mm while still in the lathe and the axle pressed in.

Live wheels are turned with a bush on the inside which is drilled and tapped for a grub screw Meccano style

Track gauge is 45mm or 1.75 inches (gauge 1) but MUCH finer than garden railway track.

Pickup is from the rails of course.

Sounds good.  Built a fold up brass frame & Mishima drive a long time ago.  Always fancied a Tenshodo spud bogie, but the axel length wouldn’t be easy to vary much.  

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More trams please Barry! 

 

Come on man! I know you have at least a score of the things. Your public awaits!

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It’s great to see something really different and so good!!

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Posted (edited)
On 19/06/2018 at 09:29, Ian T said:

It’s great to see something really different and so good!!

Thanks Ian, Trams are certainly different in the modelling world, so many advantages.

1:32 scale suits my eyesight! I have a complete layout on a 8x4 base, so many prototypes to choose from, 1 single tram is a complete unit, Tight curves.

I wish more modellers would choose this subject.

There are plenty of trams at Ferny Grove you could model, I will put up Colin's Brisbane dropcenter for you shortly.

Edited by Barry Marchant
correct text.

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20 hours ago, Barry Marchant said:

Thanks Ian, Trams are certainly different in the modelling world, so many advantages.

1:32 scale suits my eyesight! I have a complete layout on a 8x4 base, so many prototypes to choose from, 1 single tram is a complete unit, Tight curves.

I wish more modellers would choose this subject.

There are plenty of trams at Ferny Grove you could model, I will put up Colin's Brisbane dropcenter for you shortly.

Hi Barry, I’ve visited the Ferny Grove trams and had a great time, my brother (in the UK) is really into trams, buses and trolley buses, etc. He is currently building a N gauge railway that has a street tramway servicing the stations.  I’ll send him these pictures which I’m sure will greatly interest him. Keep up the good work, I’m sure we’d all like to see some more pictures. Regards Ian

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Very nice work and an interesting bill of materials. The carved stairs and carved/cast sideframes came out really well!

 

I must show this to my dad in the morning, he's a volunteer motorman at Queen Elizabeth Park.

 

Cheers,

 

Will

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