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Badder

PIT STOP - replacing 2 side walls using FTINFBISS

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Ah! Thank you- not sure how I missed that :lol:

 

that’ll be the longest thread I’ve read on here now, the second-longest being @Nigel Heath‘s Sevans dalek.

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13 hours ago, DalekCheese said:

Ah! Thank you- not sure how I missed that :lol:

 

that’ll be the longest thread I’ve read on here now, the second-longest being @Nigel Heath‘s Sevans dalek.

There were some staggeringly long WIPs on here I seem to recall. One was of a King Tiger with full interior... I think that ran to 30 odd pages, quite a lot for an AFV, and another of a Wessex Whirlwind(?) helicopter with a fully scratch-built interior, including engine, and detailing right down to headsets, their cables and plug in sockets. That ran to over 80 pages.  I'm not sure if they were victims of the photobucket debacle, but if not, they should still be viewable. Again, go to the relevant forum (military, aviation etc, click on WIP and sort by most viewed content (is probably the quickest way of finding them) I suspect my Ever Evolvin Dio is going to run into the 70's. As for this dio, I'm not sure. Possibly it could run even longer as I have an idea to make 'lift-out' sections with the different vehicles on each. And of course, I will probably have some different 'stage props' for each scene.

 

Rearguards,

Badder

Edited by Badder

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With my Tiger hopefully finished, later today, I will be returning to work on this building.

Specifically, I hope to improve the look of the exterior stonework, with regards to texture and colour.

 

TFL

Badder

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BADDER! is it You?, in the flesh-so to speak.  The sounds of timpani and base are resounding through the lands of Merriment and Murmur.

Huzzah! the master returns from the battles of  Tamiyatiger (a most fearsome beast), after besting the willy beast in its lair.

Now we can once again revel in the comforts of home and hearth, while scrutinizing every stroke of genius, by  the one and only Badder.spacer.png

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6 hours ago, Prop Duster said:

BADDER! is it You?, in the flesh-so to speak.  The sounds of timpani and base are resounding through the lands of Merriment and Murmur.

Huzzah! the master returns from the battles of  Tamiyatiger (a most fearsome beast), after besting the willy beast in its lair.

Now we can once again revel in the comforts of home and hearth, while scrutinizing every stroke of genius, by  the one and only Badder.spacer.png

Hi Steve,

Nice to see you. I hope you are well? I see you are still in fine form, although your spelling of 'bass' might upset the less talented of the rhythm section.  Having said that, bass players wouldn't notice anyway, unless you turned the font size all the way up to eleven, used bold script repeated the one word over and over again.

 

Thanks for noticing my Tiger, I wasn't aware you were following its protracted delivery, you lurker you!

 

As for this particular diorama, I must admit I'm rather looking forward to getting back to it and getting the collapsed roof on (or off) but I want to get the farmhouse finished in my Ever Evolvin' Dio first. That shouldn't take too long now though, so I will see you here soon!

 

Rearguards,

Badder

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Ahh yes when to use  E or S - base  or bass all very confusing to us Yanks.  I have been on a several months long safari in the high country of the Dipsy Doodle.  We didn't bag even one.  But a jolly good time was had as the bearers  would put elephant feathers on their conical hats and we could shoot them off -the feathers not the bearers.  Had to wind down the hunt though, as the dashed ammunition  was getting corroded from the buffalo's slobbering  on it.   Well, Good to see your sprit is willing and my viewing-ness  is at the ready, So lead on MacDuff---so to speak.  :like:

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Right, one thing that's been a niggle about this building: the gable wall, the MiniArt gable wall, the gable wall which inspired and was the 'seed' for this ruined

building. It wasn't perfectly perpendicular in one corner; didn't stand super straight, was a wee bit wonky, this wall.

 

 

It wasn't MiniArt's fault. It was mine. When I glued their vacuformed 'hollow' wall to my plaster inner wall it was pulled slightly out of shape in one corner. I never noticed this until after I'd attached the side walls and was deep into the construction of the rest of the building. The deformation wasn't great: 4 millimetres off the perpendicular between the top and bottom of the wall, and most would no doubt overlook it. But I never could. So I finally decided to fix it.

 

The wonky corner can be seen below, on the right.

EmrE5P8.jpg

 

I worked out that the easiest was was to slice into the vacuformed wall's top left corner, along the roof slope and also down to the ground.

wbtxXPn.jpg

 

 

A steel ruler was pushed into the hollow cavity and was used to break glue bonds and lever the top corner of the wall outwards until it was perpendicular.

1NZJyLW.jpg

 

The hollow was then stuffed with folded bits of pape until this held the face of the wall in the correct position. CA was then dribbled over the paper, fixing everything together securely.

 

 

The gaps are being filled with putty.

shW74ek.jpg

 

Of course, the wall is now thicker than it was at the top of the corner, but I'm going to hide it under roof tiles, so it doesn't matter.

 

TFL

Badder

Edited by Badder

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After all thaf faffing about 'unwonking' the wonky walll, you'll no doubt all be surprised to read that I've deconstructed the building and it is now in 3 parts!

 

The fact is, or was, that I was going to roof 2/3rd's of the building (admittedly some of it collapsed and opened up) and that meant that I needn't worry too much about some of the internal details in the ground floor rooms (the main room behind the wonky wall being the most 'covered up)

 

I've now decided to be a bit more 'open' about things and expose the ground floor and internal details in all of the rooms. And that requires that I have to 'get in there' to work on it. The thing is/was that the building as it stood must weigh around 4kg and is 40cm x 20cm, so it was rather awkward to work on, with some areas being almost inaccessible

 

So, as I say, the building is now in 3 parts, thanks to a razor saw, hacksaw and a bit of 'seat of my pants' bending the walls back and forth.

No photos as yet cos it's way past my beddy-times.

Pics later today.

 

TFL

Badder

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Oh, What fun. Cutting  and deconstructing the house .  I'm just grateful to be a witness to this historical event.  The deconstructing of a bombed out house.

 

[isn't bomb out sorta synonymous with deconstruction?----hummm have to ask Badder next time I see his postings😕]🤣🤣

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On 10/24/2019 at 5:37 AM, Prop Duster said:

Oh, What fun. Cutting  and deconstructing the house .  I'm just grateful to be a witness to this historical event.  The deconstructing of a bombed out house.

 

[isn't bomb out sorta synonymous with deconstruction?----hummm have to ask Badder next time I see his postings😕]🤣🤣

Hi Steve,

I'm happy to hear read that you're enjoying my trials and tribulations (however self-inflicted they may be) I just can't continue without improving on my previous attempts  at windows. Or walls. Or roofs. I am even considering altering the floor plan of the entire building. Still, I have all of the building blocks (pun) for a new one should I wish. Note that the word deconstructing implies a deliberate and precise act, whilst bombing results in a random, less predictable state of affairs. But my building was not the victim of a bombing in the first place, more a victim of time, dry and wet rot, wind, rain, ice and snow, pilferers, vandals and possibly a herd of stampeding heffers set to flight by the farmer's wife's nose's loud expulsion of the lung's gaseous contents.

 

Whatever, pics of some improved 'windies' (Scottish pronunciation of 'windows') will follow.

Rearguards,

Badder.

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I've not been too well again, so progress has been slow.  But first, I blew the building   deconstructed the building. It is now in five parts. (not all shown in the photo below)

R3LoTHa.jpg

 

Then I improved the windows in the gable wall.

 

Upper window, with trimmed coffee stirrers for the window frames and transparent plastic food container for the glass.

3CtAhn9.jpg

 

The same window from the inside. I didn't need to be fussy about the fixing of the glass this side as it won't be seen. But I wanted to get the window sill right as it can be seen from the outside. It still needs some work doing on it to tidy it up.

3J5YDnI.jpg

 

And the ground floor window. Obviously repairs and tidying up of the surrounding stonework is required.

 

oWPRojG.jpg

 

TFL

Badder

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On 10/26/2019 at 12:44 PM, Badder said:

I've not been too well again,

Sorry to hear that. Anything out of your normal ailments or just those playing havoc ? I wish i had the $£ to do this kind of work. Its wonderful BTW, I have a few designs in my head that id love to get out and built. 

Edited by Corsairfoxfouruncle

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14 hours ago, Vince1159 said:

Fantastic work on the glass Badder....

Hi Vince,

Nice to see you and I hope you and yours are well.

Thanks. The'glass' was cut from the inner plastic tray that held two rather delicious chocolate eclairs.  Extra insulin was required.

 

Rearguards,

Badder

 

 

23 minutes ago, Corsairfoxfouruncle said:

Sorry to hear that. Anything out of your normal ailments or just those playing havoc ? I wish i had the $£ to do this kind of work. Its wonderful BTW, I have a few designs in my head that id love to get out and built. 

Hi Dennis,

I've messaged you regarding my condition, but yes, extra problems on top of the usual ones. grrrrr.

 

As for my building, it really hasn't cost me much. The original MiniArt kit, which was basically just the gable wall and a couple of stumps for the side walls, was around 15 quid, and I spent perhaps another 20 on latex and plaster of paris. But I have enough latex to make lots and lots of moulds for the future, so that was worth it. Everything else used in the building was free; discarded or new coffee-stirrers for the window frames, floorboards, rafters and barn doors, a yard brush's bristles for the er..... cross pieces that the roof tiles are nailed to?? a food container for the window glass, a long stick from a firework rocket for floor joists and beams and diabetes blood-testing strips for the roof tiles!  Still to come is the ivy which I'll make using crafter's paper punches. I have quite a few of those, but all were around 5 quid, the paper is free, and again, I can churn out a variety of leaves forever more.

 

I'm always on the look-out for everyday items that can be put to good use in our hobby , either in stores, or 'in  the wild' for things like branches/twigs/moss etc. But the best placesf are fly-tips (illegal rubbish dumps) a great source for all kinds of materials.

 

Rearguards,

Badder

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I have finished constructing the two windows at the gable wall end, both inside and out and will be applying chipped blue paint to the window frames soon. But first I thought I'd tidy up the window surrounds , painting the bare plastic/wood and applying yet another plaster of Paris wash to all of the stonework. Layers. Layers are good.

ii0Ipge.jpg

 

There's still that hole to fill top left of the window:

KEVDjm2.jpg

 

 

The panes of glass are currently dirty with the plaster wash, but I'm going to clean them back, just a bit.

jJVfnQK.jpg

 

 

As for the doorway, I've always thought that MiniArt make their doors too tall, I've already lowered the height of this doorway, but still not enough IMHO, so I decided to cheat and construct a transom window over the door. This door is one I made for a doorway in the interior and is only there by way of explanation. The transom window can be seen above it, but has yet to be glazed. I will probably split the window into two or three panes.

f0f3p9G.jpg

 

TFL

Badder

Edited by Badder

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4 hours ago, Svedberg said:

Excellent as always!

Who is the fellow to the right? In total despair? 😀

Hi Svedberg,

 

Thanks for your endorsement. I'm humbled as always!

The fellow on the right may look as though he's leaning, head down against the wall, but he does not actually have a head. He's a tank commander from MiniArt's German Winter Tank Crew set and I was just using him as a rough guide to the height of the door, making allowances for his missing head of course.

 

Rearguards,

Badder

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I had two previous attempts at making and fitting the transom window above the door and failed with both due to trembling which caused me to break them. But it was a case of 3rd time lucky.

Here it is before a tidy-up and painting.

q62JDf1.jpg

 

I'm pondering over whether to fit a door. It could be fitted slightly ajar or fully open, hanging off its hinges, rotted and fallen to bits but still on hits hinges, laying on the floor, propped up against the wall, or missing entirely due to theft.

 

 

TFL

Badder

 

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Intending to continue with making more windows, I had deal with the matter of the side wall below:

XtLCXZm.jpg
This side wall was a bit of a mish-mash, made up of a 'spare plaster' cast fitted onto the end of MiniArt's stump of a side wall. The cut down the corner shows the corner being made up of two adjoining plastic parts. The limit to which the 'stump' of side wall extends  is roughly down the heavily scored line running parallel to the cut, but extended further along at the base.

 

Here is a photo of this corner of the gable wall with the side plastic-and-plaster side wall removed. The hollow vacuformed frontage can clearly be seen, with the inner plaster wall fitted on the back:

9XjK1Fl.jpg

 

 

 

 

Whilst the join between this gable wall and the side wall was pretty good I was lazy at the outset and rather than thinking about the position of the windows I just fitted the 'spare' cast to the plastic wall stump. The windows then, are off centre, of different sizes and the upper floor window is too close to the top of the wall. In fact that window's lintel forms the top of the wall. These are not serious oversights by the architect, but it eventually bugged the hell out of him and so he's decided to scrap that wall and build a new one.

 

And he decided to build the new one using FTINFBISS (Foamboard That Is Not Foamboard But Is Something Similar)

So a rectangle of FTINFBISS was scribed from a 4ft x 3ft sheet of the stuff and was slotted into the corner so that the courses of stonework could be transfered across:

ZwwWWgD.jpg

 

The courses were transferred across using a scalpel but are highlighted with a biro (roughly) It is now a case of scribing a suitable stonework pattern on the new section of wall and deciding the position, shape and size of the windows. I'm thinking of making the upper floor window short in height, but elongated.

 

Of course, this new wall will need an interior wall fitted as well. And then it will have to be fitted to the rest of the building, so the stonework pattern must fit both the gable wall and the other section of building. Then there's the side wall opposite this new wall to consider. I shall have to remake that as well.  But the good thing about FTINFBISS, is that it's very easy and quick to work with.

 

TFL

Badder

 

 

Edited by Badder

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Not much in the way of progress. but I've cut out another piece of FTINFBISS to size and have marked out the courses of stone. Defining the stones at the corner will be the easiest. The horizontal lines continue across the FTINFBISS but obiously do not relate to the courses of the adjoining section of wall. There, the marked lines will have to be adjusted so that they do. A less rustic building, with properly defined courses would present much more of a problem in this regard.

 

Here is the new section of FTINFBISS rested in place. The other section of FTINFBISS will now become the inner wall.

4SFZ8aF.jpg

As is always the case, the joint between the FTINFBISS and the plaster wall will be improved by countersinking and overlapping thin, plasticard stones across it.

 

TFL

Badder

 

 

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There are several great properties of FTINFBISS, and one of them is that it takes impressions well. I don't mean impressions made by the likes of Mike Yarwood, (showing my age) but those made by scribers, pencils or in the case below, ballpoint pens....

 

Y132nTK.jpg

 

This is only the first roughing out of the stonework. with the wall dry-fitted to check for the alignment of the corner stones:

3bOW1TF.jpg

 

The next step was to create a bit of variation between individual stones by dimpling some with the pen nib, and pushing entire stones 'inwards' with applied pressure from the blunt ended scalpel handle. The dimpled stones appear black (from the pen ink) whilst the pressed stones appear white. (due to removal of the brown ink)

W2DxvrQ.jpg

Whilst the stonework pattern does look a bit slapdash, it will be improved with further treatments.

 

 

Another property of FTINFBISS is that whilst it is stiff it is possible to cut the board using heavy-duty scissors, scribe a line part-way through it and bend it back on itself to snap it along the line, or cut through it with a sharp blade......

Ti2DOeH.jpg

And the stuff will readily accept CA, which I used to attach the coffee stirrers. The stirrers just happen to be the right width to match the lintels and sills of the windows.

 

I've fitted the inner wall to the back of the outer wall, using doubled-up coffee stirrers as spacers between the two. Here's the complete wall dry-fitted:

sLBKpcL.jpg

 

 

 

TFL

Badder

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I've fixed the new wall to the gable wall and have made a start on filling and cleaning up the joint. The stonework patterns line up fairly well, with just a few needing seeing to. The new wall had a wash with plaster dust so as to highlight areas which need attention. Some of the vertical mortar lines can be seen overshooting into the stones below.

 

okJI9qq.jpg

 

Meanwhile, the joint between the new wall and the rest of the building needs some serious work.  This area was always a bit of a mess so I had intended to hide a lot of it behind ivy. I will still be adding the ivy, but I am going to improve the joint anyway.  I've also decided to add dormer windows tothe old section of wall (to the right in photo below)

d9S0Nc1.jpg

 

I had to tidy up the damaged section of wall first, and then added the sills.

76GF1vD.jpg

 

Meanwhile, I made a start on making the new wall to fit to the other side of the gable wall. Rather than start  from scratch, I decided to make use of the FTINFBISS insert from the old wall and cut it into I cut the corner of the gable wall and half way into the next supporting wall. I also added a strip of FTINFBISS along the top of the insert and reduced the height of the window while I was at it.

 

yFvrdTH.jpg

 

I am now concentrating entirely on the dormer windows and that section of wall.

 

TFL

Badder

 

 

 

TFL

Badder

 

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Progress has been a bit slow because I'm having to sit and stare at the building and try to figure out how everything is going to fit together. Having decided to add dormer windows to the central roomI have to work out how the roof and the dormers would be constructed. And then I have to decide whether to model the whole lot, collapse some of it, or the majority of it. At the moment I'm leaning towards constructing a collapsed roof and the barest remnants of dormer window on the RHS, whilst the LHS remains fairly intact.

 

In between the sitting, staring and thinking, I continued work on the windows in the new section of wall and made preparations for matching up the stonework between new and oldsections of wall. The central column between the two small upper windows is a block of FTINFBISS made from two rectangles CA'd together. At the moment it is just dry-fitted. The windows look wonky, but that's due to foreshortening by the camera lens.

4OpJPE3.jpg

 

 

 

pdcl2jE.jpg

 

 

 

Meanwhile, the roof over the middle room (to right in photo) will slope down to the level of the two dry-fitted blocks in the centre pf the photo. The intact window on the left then, will stand proud of the roof with its own little roof over the top (essentially the definition of a dormer window)

lMGCZuK.jpg

 

 

TFL

Badder

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I have been remiss in keeping a close eye on your shenanigans'  and what do I find after coming back from safari to outer reaches of middle earth? Why you have made enormous strides in creating or shall we say once again recreating the wall or a wall -its all a bit hazy. That it seemed to offend  your fine since abilities is easily understood by all of your loyal minions and followers of this project. I'm sure this latest recreation of a stone wall will show through with all the skill and daring of your past land mark parts (well except for this miscreant wall ). 

Regardless! Mortar board and trowel at the ready, I  euphemistically, once again stand poised to dash in at a moments notice to add my humble troweling to keep the project on an even keel.   So, as a unabashed admirer and accolade. I once again sing your praises 😌----------------- 🙄Oh, brother!-sigh

 

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