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PIT STOP. Made Youtube vid. Link top page 1 of the thread


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Badder, Just a quick note re: your current progress to date.  Spec-tac-u-lar!  So many changes that work, in concert, with the previous works. 

 

I have taken a page from you book so to speak, and have CA-ed it to my current construction/modelll/vain attempt, to build a car kit. In accepting the advanced age of my kit (circa 1950's ) the interior supplied was a seat, dashboard, steering wheel, floor. However I felt the total lack of a interior door panel was an egregious error. So paper in hand, Photoshop-ery completed, printer fired up, a set of new door interior panels was born! :clap: of course now I'll redo them to a more correct size-sigh. 

Hope the Spring season has begun to lighten and brighten your world, as it has ours.  

 

 

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13 hours ago, Prop Duster said:

Badder, Just a quick note re: your current progress to date.  Spec-tac-u-lar!  So many changes that work, in concert, with the previous works. 

 

I have taken a page from you book so to speak, and have CA-ed it to my current construction/modelll/vain attempt, to build a car kit. In accepting the advanced age of my kit (circa 1950's ) the interior supplied was a seat, dashboard, steering wheel, floor. However I felt the total lack of a interior door panel was an egregious error. So paper in hand, Photoshop-ery completed, printer fired up, a set of new door interior panels was born! :clap: of course now I'll redo them to a more correct size-sigh. 

Hope the Spring season has begun to lighten and brighten your world, as it has ours.  

 

 

Hi Steve,

First off, thanks as always,  Spring hasn't really arrived in any recognizable form other than some snowbells, slightly warmer weather and slightly longer days. Where you live I suspect the latter is less pronounced as it is here. It's entirely possible to wake up in the dark, go work in the dark, do an honest day's work then step outside the 'office' out into the dark. Living, working and sleeping in a coal mine probably doesn't help.

 

Congrats on your soon-to-be-successful 'scratch--built' door panels! Little details... often easy, but make a huge difference. For a moment I misread and thought you'd used my 'CA'd paper construction method, making a 'plasticized paper panel', but I realise that's not necessarily required. You must post some photos for me to peruse.

 

Anyhoo, my time on the toilet has ended so I will sign off for now. LOL. joking.

 

TC dude,

 

Badder

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A little progress report, while I'm here doing other things.............

No photos, as yet, but I will edit this post and add them with more info later today.

 

I've more or less finished the roof sections over the central part of the building, with batons and a few roof tiles added. All of the sections can be removed, or dropped into the building, or onto the ground beside it. I am now moving on to the LHS of the building to make roof sections for that. These, along with the missing gable wall will be totally collapsed,  into the building and outside on the ground as well. I have plenty of spare plaster casts and sections of old unused wall which will make that a fairly quick and straight forward job, so things will speed up a bit now.

 

Anyway, must crack  on!

Hope to see you all later,

TC

Rearguards,

Badder 

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Nearly 2am and I've read thru the lot ( with a couple of tea and food breaks!)...absolutely brilliant stuff.

I do like the modular approach with swappable sections and removable roofs, several scenarios for the price of one, kind of !

This is going to be re read for reference, along with your other one, no doubt several times. This is a treasury of ideas and techniques.

I particularly liked the red brick bits that'd been done like an "extension" to the apexes and upper parts...I've recently seen some slightly "chancy" looking builders doing a very similar thing in 1-1 scale !

This is going to be very useful / inspirational stuff ... I must now hunt round for some FTINFBISS !

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On 3/3/2021 at 2:07 AM, Pig of the Week said:

This is a treasury of ideas and techniques.

I particularly liked the red brick bits that'd been done like an "extension" to the apexes and upper parts...I've recently seen some slightly "chancy" looking builders doing a very similar thing in 1-1 scale !

This is going to be very useful / inspirational stuff ... I must now hunt round for some FTINFBISS !

Hi, PotW.

Thanks for your kind comments. It's always nice to know someone has found something useful amongst all the waffle lol.

If I had to pick my favourite part of this thread, it's my discovering the use of Fairy Liquid to make 'bubbly' washes for the roof tiles in particular. The red brick alterations to the supporting walls.......... interesting story. I could either cast some brick wall sections in plaster and glue them on, or carve new browstone blocks, or cast them then file them to shape. The brownstone blocks are thicker though, and require more plaster of paris and more carving or filing. But I plumped for the red brickwork because I did think it's what the owner of the building would have done as well. I suspect the original stonemasons were no longer around so sourcing brownstone blocks would have been difficult. See, that's how I justify being lazy, by making up believable excuses on behalf of a fictional character. lol

 

Rearguards,

Badder

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Posted (edited)

The roof over the central room is done, barring some batons and 1 or 2 tiles which I have yet to add to the final segment. That segment is at the rear of the building, on the left in the photo below. Some fitting was required to get all of the roof parts to meet up satisfactorily. In the photo though, they weren't properly aigned because i had been messing about with the unpainted rafter on the right, and had nudged the roof out of position.

                                                                  fuRYmnO.jpg

 

 

KXpkE8z.jpg

 

 

With that job done, I did start messing around making parts for the roof which has collapsed completely, but then realised I'd best make the piles of rubble first! Silly me!. So, out with spare scraps of plaster cast walls, break them up into chunks,  and CA them in a pile.  As I don't have an actual base yet I glued them onto a piece of plasticard which will be screwed to the base when the time comes. It's actually a lot easier to do such work 'off the base' any way.

 

So,some rubble.....

 

'.W3i8Njt.jpg

 

And the observant might have noticed the dirty drinking glass in the earlier photo........... well that contained ashes from a coal fire and I used those to make the finer debris.

7kyJHij.jpg

 

 

And I've been sticking bits of beam in there as well. 

mgc8Vmi.jpg

 

I'll be adding a few more stones, a fair few red bricks, roof tiles, more woodwork, including raters and window frames and a bit of glass. As most of that will have fallen from a greater height it will have landed last and so be uppermost in the pile. Stating the bleeding obvious, but it's surprising how many times I've seen floor boards laying on top of collapsed roof sections lol.

 

But before I add all that, I'll probably give this lot a base coat, some detail painting and washes.

 

TFL

Badder

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  • Badder changed the title to PIT STOP The walls! ERRRR... The walls are opening out!
  • 2 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

Not for the first time during this project, but:  'Oh silly me!!'

 

Whilst setting about the painting of the pile of rubble/debris above, I thought I'd pick out the stone blocks from the upper floor window surrounds with a coat of black ,as per the rest of the upper floor window surrounds. I'd put them more or less directly below the lower floor window, having allowed for the fact that some had bounced or slide further afield when they landed on the existing pile.

 

'Ah.'

I had, in my head, assumed that the upper floor window would be above the lower floor window. But I hadn't allowed for the fact that the lower floor window was placed centrally in the gable wall, whilst the roof was off centre! So the lintel for the upper floor window would be very close to breaking through the roof.  So the window could not be where I had assume it would be. And that meant it would have to be offset to the left, or not exist at all. And if I moved it to the left, then I'd have to removed part of the the wall that I'd already modelled. I decided to do away with having a window then.

 

Problem solved? No. The amount of rubble in the pile no longer matched the volume of stonework that a windowless upper wall would create. Moreover, the shape of the pile was no longer correct. The pile should be a fair bit higher in the middle. I did set about adding to the pile above, but in the end decided just to start again.

 

So, here's the new pile. I've added some moss, and done some weathering, but there will be loose red bricks, roof tiles and woodwork to add.

xMeUVjC.jpg

 

jekMuMY.jpg

 

 

Ivy will be covering a fair bit of this wall, but I will be using a scalpel to better define the stonework, and make it look even more decrepit. 

WzH5bAa.jpg

 

1FSK9Ml.jpg

 

TFL

Badder

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Badder

 As I once again gaze across the miniature  hinterland, sighting the ancient ruins of a once thriving family enclave. Having now been left to the whims of nature and weather, I can see how the effort of the family members and neighbors had tried to keep the buildings whole and hearty, have been eroded away, leaving a derelict structure.  The sound of the whistling wind and the creak of half rotted timbers and stone walls settling into the sodden earth below, is ever present. There! That may the sound of a furtive animal scouring the debris for a new den, but always the keening wind ever present.  
                                                     OR
Great job of re-de-structing on the latest additional piles. I once had pil------ Never mind-TMI.
Your masterful calculations for the size/shape/content of your debris field are a inspired touch.  While it may not, necessarily be obvious to a casual observer, those trained in the structural engineering field will apricate your craftsmanship, as do I. 

Here in the former colonies, at our palatial hovel in the wilds, my dame and I have received the second of the two required Covid shots and have had nary a speck of any reaction, so we're feeling a lot more calm. [I suppose the wild eye swings and barking  will go away soon, don't you think?]  spacer.png


Stay hail and hearty and keep the brick dust to a reasonable level, as you gamely model on (or model gamely on ?)
 

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Out of interest Mr B..for your fragments are you still using cast sections ( broken up) of the casts you made of the Tamiya wall sections ?

I'm going to be needing much rubble at some point so was going to start experiments shortly, naturally revisiting your earlier stuff again for pointers..( still think you should write a book !)

I have ordered a couple of moulds from a place called Diorama Debris, they're for individual bricks and another for small sections of brick wall for starters. I was also thinking, for variety, about getting the Tamiya set to take moulds from as you did and wondered what you thought of them in light of your expanding build technology !!

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On 3/18/2021 at 6:29 PM, Svedberg said:

I like the pile! The rest looks fine as well, althogh 'fine' is perhaps not the appropriate word in this case 😀

Thanks.

I've either forgotten your name, or didn't know it in the first place, but thanks Svedberg. lol Yes, I have to force myself NOT to make things look too tidy. It's so easy to be tempted to make whole, undamaged roof sections, walls etc. It'd be a lot easier, and quicker to make everything 'new' but that'd be boring lol

 

Rearguards,

Badder

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On 3/18/2021 at 9:31 PM, Prop Duster said:

Badder

 As I once again gaze across the miniature  hinterland, sighting the ancient ruins of a once thriving family enclave. Having now been left to the whims of nature and weather, I can see how the effort of the family members and neighbors had tried to keep the buildings whole and hearty, have been eroded away, leaving a derelict structure.  The sound of the whistling wind and the creak of half rotted timbers and stone walls settling into the sodden earth below, is ever present. There! That may the sound of a furtive animal scouring the debris for a new den, but always the keening wind ever present.  
                                                     OR
Great job of re-de-structing on the latest additional piles. I once had pil------ Never mind-TMI.
Your masterful calculations for the size/shape/content of your debris field are a inspired touch.  While it may not, necessarily be obvious to a casual observer, those trained in the structural engineering field will apricate your craftsmanship, as do I. 

Here in the former colonies, at our palatial hovel in the wilds, my dame and I have received the second of the two required Covid shots and have had nary a speck of any reaction, so we're feeling a lot more calm. [I suppose the wild eye swings and barking  will go away soon, don't you think?]  spacer.png


Stay hail and hearty and keep the brick dust to a reasonable level, as you gamely model on (or model gamely on ?)
 

Hi Proppy,

I was carried away by your poeticism poeticness, poeticricty..... paint-fume-induced ramblings. I actually did hear the beams creak and the wind whistle through the roof tiles. It was all very surreal, and spoiled only by Molly the cat throwing herself 4ft up and thumping into the patio door asking to be let in.

As for my structural engineering, I confess I did have to look at various roof constructions of the appropriate era. I think I can name most if not all the roof parts now. The 'barge boards' as I've learned them to be called, I previously called 'Bstrds' because I was often having to re-model and even completely replace them as the rest of the building 'moved'  in relationship. .... a curse of having not fixed the 2 'halves' of the building together yet. Getting the debris right is quite difficult. I've had an idea which will make some of it a lot easier, but I will leave that for a later post.

Good to read you and yours have had both jabs. You are very lucky. Here in UK 90 odd percent of those who've had their first jab won't be getting our second jab for 12 weeks, and there's a possibility we might not get one on time, even then!

 

I'd do all the emoji silly face stuff, but it's 4 o'clock of the AY EM and I can barely see the screen. 

 

So it's good night from me, and it's good night from him. (The Two Ronnies... google them)

 

TC

Badder

 

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On 3/21/2021 at 8:31 PM, Pig of the Week said:

Out of interest Mr B..for your fragments are you still using cast sections ( broken up) of the casts you made of the Tamiya wall sections ?

I'm going to be needing much rubble at some point so was going to start experiments shortly, naturally revisiting your earlier stuff again for pointers..( still think you should write a book !)

I have ordered a couple of moulds from a place called Diorama Debris, they're for individual bricks and another for small sections of brick wall for starters. I was also thinking, for variety, about getting the Tamiya set to take moulds from as you did and wondered what you thought of them in light of your expanding build technology !!

Hi Pig,

I'm basically using whatever material is 'easiest'. I have various bags containing 'debris', stuff I made and then not used, or stuff I made then broke up and replaced, bits of crushed plaster, crushed real bricks, sand/grit, matchsticks, and wooden coffee stirrers, 'new' or split, cut, snapped etc. I also have a fair few bits of 'old' and 'unused' wall sections which are plaster casts of the original MiniArt wall. Now that I'm doing 'rubble' I have sometimes sliced those casts up to give me loose stone blocks, such as those in the pile. There are just a few bits of red brick in there at the moment, small sections of bricks still mortared together. Those are bits snapped off the plaster casts of Tamiya's brick wall set. However, when it comes to making loose single red bricks, I found that those casts aren't the best thing to use. Even using a razor saw, slicing those casts up removes too much 'mortar' between the bricks and so they end up thinner than they should be. Yes, I could move the cut-line, but then the next 'coarse' of bricks is ruined. Besides, going to the trouble of casting the sections in plaster, only to slice them up is a waste of a piece of brick wall. Instead what I will do is pour a 2.5mm layer of plaster onto a flat surface and then score and chop that up into individual bricks. Having said that, I could just as easily make the bricks from FTINFBISS, or even cut and sanded matchsticks, which I've done in the past.

 

If you have moulds for bits of wall, that's great. All moulds are useful. But my tip would be to use them to cast the bits, glue the bits together to make bigger sections of wall, then make latex moulds of those. By adding THOSE casts together and making more moulds, you could in the end make yourself single moulds which can be used to cast entire walls. You could make several, with different architectural features. That' why I have a collection of MiniArt buildings kits. I chose each because they have different bricks or stone blocks. I also have a city building, with more 'cultured' construction.  And I will make moulds of them as well. The latex is fairly cheap and goes a long way.

 

Hope that helps,

Rearguards,

Badder

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Some great info there mr B

...funnily enough I collected a bag full of old real brick fragments etc only yesterday, with a view to grinding them up...I also got some bits of very old brittle roof slate, i can get loads of this and reckon it'd be good as it crumbles well into interesting bits.( If you were making a "scree" type outdoor landscape it'd be ideal too )

I also splurged some cash on a couple of posh looking moulds from Diorama Debris, worth a look at them if you haven't already.

These are moulds for individual bricks, I got the plain unfrogged ones, makes about 100 per batch, and another mould for a basic wall section, its only about 2ins by 4ins but joinable of course. Once I start producing these I should be ok for individual bricks at least !!

Looks like I'd better get some latex to make my own moulds too, do you have any specific recommendations for that btw ?

I notice various sellers on ebay flogging bags of 1/35 bricks, some of these look too big to be in scale, i did a bit of research on brick sizes, apparently german bricks are a bit bigger, to be spot on each brick would need to be 6.8 mm..!

Brit standard bricks are just a tad smaller. Obviously there's going to be a fair bit of local variation in all this.

I've also got some plaster arriving, it is the stuff recommended by a responder way back in your thread, that is supposed to take detail better. I'll try a batch of bricks on it's arrival.

Possibly I need to get a miniart city style building to kick off with too, as I'm looking more at the urban / industrial type scenarios.

Anyway many thanks again for all the advice & inspiration  !

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On 3/24/2021 at 8:47 AM, Pig of the Week said:

Some great info there mr B

...funnily enough I collected a bag full of old real brick fragments etc only yesterday, with a view to grinding them up...I also got some bits of very old brittle roof slate, i can get loads of this and reckon it'd be good as it crumbles well into interesting bits.( If you were making a "scree" type outdoor landscape it'd be ideal too )

I also splurged some cash on a couple of posh looking moulds from Diorama Debris, worth a look at them if you haven't already.

These are moulds for individual bricks, I got the plain unfrogged ones, makes about 100 per batch, and another mould for a basic wall section, its only about 2ins by 4ins but joinable of course. Once I start producing these I should be ok for individual bricks at least !!

Looks like I'd better get some latex to make my own moulds too, do you have any specific recommendations for that btw ?

I notice various sellers on ebay flogging bags of 1/35 bricks, some of these look too big to be in scale, i did a bit of research on brick sizes, apparently german bricks are a bit bigger, to be spot on each brick would need to be 6.8 mm..!

Brit standard bricks are just a tad smaller. Obviously there's going to be a fair bit of local variation in all this.

I've also got some plaster arriving, it is the stuff recommended by a responder way back in your thread, that is supposed to take detail better. I'll try a batch of bricks on it's arrival.

Possibly I need to get a miniart city style building to kick off with too, as I'm looking more at the urban / industrial type scenarios.

Anyway many thanks again for all the advice & inspiration  !

Hi prize-winning pig,

I haven't looked at the debris moulds of which you speak, but I have seen some in the past and they all look good to me. I just prefer not to spend cash on things I can make myself. But I do highly recommend getting a few MiniArt buildings, as I said, to take moulds off, if nothing else. Look at every kit they sell because some simple cheap ones will be worth more as a pattern for making moulds than some bigger more expensive ones. Also be aware that may of their kits come with the same 'standard sprues' containing parts for making windows/doors/gates/lamposts etc and they often have lots of spare bits left over which aren't used in the pictured model..... so that's always a nice bonus. Many people slag their buildings kits off, but if you learn the techniques for constructing them they are well worth the money - not that they are expensive anyway.

 

I look forward to seeing what you come up with.

 

Rearguards,

Badder

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Yes, yes, I know. I've made a collapsed floor for this area before! However, the dimensions of the room have been altered and in retrospect I think the floorboards were a bit on the thin side, as in they would have been 'springy' underfoot. It's not a difficult or long job to make them anyway, so I made some more. This time I made them thicker by gluing the coffee stirrers to a sheet of graph paper. That's now on the underside of the floorboards. First, a reminder of the section of building with the gable wall section removed for easier work and viewing. Laying on the floor are some floor joists, some of which will be fixed in place, permanently whilst the rest will be removable.

 

27b9p0E.jpg

 

The floor joists pictured below are fixed permanently in place.

FT4cjBC.jpg

 

Here I've just experimented by laying floorboards on top, with some having slipped off. I THINK I'm going to fix these together as a single assembly, but make it removable. I had the idea that the building can be shown in that state, OR, that sometime after the floor collapsed, the owner 'tidied up', pulled the floor down and stacked the joists and floorboards in piles in readiness for rebuilding this end of the building........... but war or something meant he never got around to doing it. Whatever, it means I can show the building in its more 'wood-free' state, which I quite like.

ERy9Igx.jpg

 

The floorboards are wooden coffee stirrers CA'd onto graph paper, cut to size then stained black with acrylic ink. A heavy wash with plaster dust was then applied and partly rubbed off. The joists are doubled coffee stirrers, again given a plaster dust wash. I will be 'rotting' floorboards and joists later.

9DTQBGX.jpg

 

And finally for now, I decided to carry on the theme of barred windows, figuring this end of the building is a workshop/storage area, and may even have been used as a garage for a tractor, so security would be important. Yes, I quite fancy making a rusty old tractor.

The bars are again made from polypropylene bristles from a yard brush, with coffee stirrers used to make the iron frame top and bottom. The iron bars 'were dropped into the wall cavity during the building's construction.

9sUEmeQ.jpg

Oh, and yes, yet another plaster-dust wash has been applied to the gable wall! I'll be picking out some more of the stone blocks in detail and tidying up some of those mortar lines.

 

Right, let me see if I can get these floorboards and joists all fixed into one assembly....

 

TFL

Badder.

 

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Looking great, very reminiscent of a few burned out buildings I've walked thru in the past !

I saw a couple of great miniart buildings that i fancied, only to find they're discontinued and not available :(

I take the point of using them as casting patterns tho, I'll have another look thru their range.

something you do find, or used to ( drawing from life again) in old outbuildings is the occasional derelict motorbike, one of those may be a nice little detail as an alternative to a tractor..

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On 3/28/2021 at 4:49 PM, Pig of the Week said:

Looking great, very reminiscent of a few burned out buildings I've walked thru in the past !

I saw a couple of great miniart buildings that i fancied, only to find they're discontinued and not available :(

I take the point of using them as casting patterns tho, I'll have another look thru their range.

something you do find, or used to ( drawing from life again) in old outbuildings is the occasional derelict motorbike, one of those may be a nice little detail as an alternative to a tractor..

Hi Piggy,

Yes, I've read about some of MiniArt's buildings going 'out of stock', but I don't know the reasons. Hopefully it's a commercial decision and not one brought about by the political troubles in the Ukraine. Certainly some of their older kits are a bit ropey and could do with phasing out, but whilst they are still around they do make cheap sources for castings. And thanks for the motorcycle suggestion! I have a finished Tamiya BMW r75 sidecar hidden away somewhere, which could fit the bill nicely, plus another, as yet unbuilt German motorcycle which came with a German 8rad armoured car. (Tamiya/Italeri kit IIRC) What a farmer might be doing with either one of those hidden in his lock-up one can only guess, but it's not out of the question!

 

Rearguards,

Badder

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This turned up in the post this morning. Read that carefully. 0.06mm diameter multi-braid polyethylene fishing line, with a 4kg/9lb breaking strain. You could use it to garrote an elephant. This will form the vines for the ivy climbing up the walls of this building. It will also be used in my other dio 'The ever evolvin' dio' to replace bushes and improve the foliage on my large scratch-built tree. So, be aware there will be some parallel postings going on!

 

wuaN1to.jpg

 

The ivy leaves themselves will be paper-punched and lots of this ivy will festoon the face of the wall pictured below:

 

rOKhRxT.jpg

Note that I've remade the crumbled red brickwork section over the lintel for the barn doors.

 

TFL

Badder

 

 

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rOKhRxT.jpg

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Posted (edited)

First off, something wot I maded..... a scribing block, something I really should have purchased the moment I returned to the hobby. They aren't essential, but when you're scratch-building buildings, they make the job SO much easier!. I've been making do all this time using 'line of sight' a steel ruler, set square, graph paper or 'one off, fixed height forms made from coffee stirrers! I purchased 3 scribers for less than a pound each and  was surprised by their length. I realised then that they'd be perfect for scribing blocks, if only I could be bothered to make one................ and then I had a brainwave! I had, wtthout realising it, all the necessary parts and had done for years!   So one of my many Freshwater Angling trophies, which my other half is always asking me to 'bin' (WTF? lol) was taken apart,  to provide the nice marble block and upright rod, and one of those stupid 'adjustable crocodile-clip clamp and magnifying glass things provided the mechanism for holding the scriber at adjustable heights along the rod. Job done and it works perfectly. Unfortunately it is showing up errors in heights of things on my building, some as much as 1mm out! lol.

tnvFNTT.jpg

 

 

 

And now, as you can see above I've done some more work on the central section of the building, with the nail holes in the bar doors given a spot of rust and some (final?) work done on the portico above. Mainly what I did was extend it to the left and right. I realised it was silly not to have made use of the brick columns either side, to help support it. I can't remember if I'd shown the flap of tarpaulin hanging down where the portico was smashed, or not, but her it is again ,anyway.

IiSTFE9.jpg

 

A scattering of brick dust was added as well. This was simply some crushed plaster of Paris, which I coloured with Red Earth acrylic ink. I First gave the tarp a coat of gloss acrylic varnish then dabbed the brick dust into it whilst the varnish was still wet.. I then gave the tarp a wash with plaster dust to dull the varnish down. Once that dried I scrubbed along the bottom edge of the portico with a stiff water-loaded brush to get that dry look there.

vmnHfYI.jpg

 

 

The hanging flap of torn tarp and the raggedy edge was all made with paper, cut and sliced and bent up, BEFORE being doused with thin CA. Doing it the other way around, after the CA had set, would cause the paper to snap and crack loosing all the nice bits. BTW I did actually file and sand areas of the  undamaged tarp as part of the weathering process. This probably shows up best in the photo above where you can see a couple of fairly distinct 'vertical' joints between the sheets of tarp and very faint horizontal lines showing imprints from the coffee stirrer planking underneath.

cz2qqL3.jpg

 

 

And finally, that bit of red brick section I said I'd remade. It meant having to scrap the wooden lintel it sat upon, but I am in the process of making a new one, as you can see. I think the brickwork looks much better.

Vj4fr4p.jpg

 

TFL

Badder

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Posted (edited)

I messed about with my 'washing line' method for applying paper-punched leaves to the braided fishing line. It's not perfect because the blobs of CA glue along the line have to 'grab' each leaf from the end of the applicator. If one is too heavy handed CA is sucked up onto the leaf, gets onto the tip of the applicator and then the leaf will stick to that rather than the line, and it comes away when you withdraw the applicator. And sometimes the leaf is 'grabbed' and ends up in a wonky position, or flat against the line etc and that ends up looking and so has to be removed, and gets stuck to your fingers etc etc. However, one can get some speed up and the results aren't bad. There may be better ways of constructing the vines, and I continue to experiment, my latest idea being maybe to use ...... wait for it......

ICE!

Sounds crazy, but it might just be a 'groundbreaking' new method. lol. We'll have to see how that goes!

 

Anyway, I made 3 short strands of 'creeper plant' slapped some paint on and wedged them in a hole in the wall, more to check the colour contrast than anything. This is certainly not dark enough for ivy. I am increasingly falling in love with that section of red brickwork though. I'd love to know who made it and how. lol

 

SB0XRt4.jpg

 

TFL

Badder

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  • Badder changed the title to PIT STOP. Made a vid, and set up Youtube channel.
Posted (edited)

If you read the thread title, you'll see that I've made a video and set up a YouTube channel. I'm a complete novice to making a video, and a luddite when it comes to all things tech but I worked out how to do it. I am shocked though, at how long it takes to upload stuff. I thought modern software was super fast, but no. lol

The 15 minute, introductory video is currently half-way through uploading, and it should be done in another 1hr 30 mins! Lol

 

So, what does my first video show? Well, it shows that I don't have a nice studio, surrounded by models, materials, etc, and it shows that I don't have a spare room dedicated to my hobby. In fact, it doesn't show the room at all, because I've tried to screen it all off out of embarrassment. LOL And talking of embarrassment, the vid was narrated by me, without a script and shows off my thick west country accent, oooh arrr, dontcher no, un um?

 

Being an introductory vid, I've basically shown the building as it currently stands, explained how I came up with the idea of making it a 'multi-pose' building, showed how that worked, by removing and replacing bits, and then touched on my plans for the future vids, that each would deal with a particular aspect of the build, so a demonstration video about the construction of MiniArt buildings, and how I used them as patterns for making moulds and casting walls in plaster, another about the fact that 95 percent of the painting is done with acrylic inks and physically demonstrating the techniques I employ, another about my 'plaster-dust' washes, again done 'live' and showing the various effects, another on 'CA'd paper', including how I used that to make such things as guttering, roof tiles, and wall render, another on paper punches for ivy/flowers/leaves etc, and I will probably do a vid showing my 'fishing line'method for making trees and bushes'.

 

In short, it'll be a very unprofessional-looking bunch of vids, done by a messy modeller in a messy way, but hopefully they will be entertaining and instructional. I for one am not impressed by these sponsored, studio-quality instructional videos, and I'm hoping my vids will fill a much-overlooked niche!

 

I will now nod off, and when I wake up in 5hrs or so, I will share the link to the vid!

 

I bet you feel like a kid at Christmas and champing at the bit lol.

 

TFL

Badder

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  • Badder changed the title to PIT STOP. Made Youtube vid. Link top page 1 of the thread

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