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19 hours ago, Badder said:

And it's going to fit here:

hmZePqR.jpg

 

Interesting B.  Umm, do you have a prototype for that fit?  Just it is unusual to have a door right next to a chimney.

Not impossible - I know of an internal door I use often that is next to a chimney - but that was knocked through decades after the house was built.

 

FWIW, chimneys are often amoung the strongest (load bearing) parts of a building - an adjacent door would weaken the wall and allow heat to escape to the neighbouring space.

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7 hours ago, Robert Stuart said:

Interesting B.  Umm, do you have a prototype for that fit?  Just it is unusual to have a door right next to a chimney.

Not impossible - I know of an internal door I use often that is next to a chimney - but that was knocked through decades after the house was built.

 

FWIW, chimneys are often amoung the strongest (load bearing) parts of a building - an adjacent door would weaken the wall and allow heat to escape to the neighbouring space.

Hi Robert,

 

Thanks for airing your concerns.

 

This was always intended to be a bit of a rough and rustic building, with sections re-built or added to over time, sometimes in a questionable way. So, I have deliberately added a few 'dodgy' bits of architecture.... the 3rd doorway on the upper floor being a prime example: WAY too close to the outer wall, seriously weakening the supporting wall it is cut into... and ultimately causing its collapse which brought down the roof.

 

Still, I have had lots of thoughts about this chimney. First off, it has to go somewhere in this room as it is the main living quarters/kitchen. I also considered that there be a smaller inset fireplace in the same chimney in the bedroom above. An old house I used to own had just such a thing, although I have to research how it would be structured. Whatever, there isn't really anywhere else fo the chimney to go. In scale, the doorway is probably 7-8ft to the side - far enough I think. Also, the fireplace stands proud of the wall so the door is actually rearwards of the fire and the radiating heat.  I would think it less of a cause of heat loss than the front door. That's my thinking anyway.

 

Having said all of that, I only plonked the chimney roughly in place for the photo and I COULD move it a little further away from the door.

 

 

Rearguards,

Badder

 

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Posted (edited)

A bit more work done to the wall/dormer windows, with the addition of wooden window sills and frames and some washes with ink and plaster dust.

E8Wvzq5.jpg

 

 

And then I thought I'd carry on with the chimney/fireplace, firstly adding some moss to the top of the chimney brest.

TuSIINp.jpg

 

T4enmeI.jpg

 

And adding the same to the hearth, along with some general detritus.

nXOdDve.jpg

I'm not sure what that thing that looks like a roast chicken is, but I will probably remove it and replace it with some chunks of red house brick.

 

Also note that I've raised the whole structure up on a double thickness of FTINFBISS. This is because I'm going to raise the floor level in that room by over 1cm. I'm doing that because I always reckon MiniArt ceilings to be too high. It will aslo mean that I can sink more of the building into the plaster ground.

ojYZVYa.jpg

 

And more importantly, it gives me the opportunity to make a really nice tiled floor for the room. I'm going to go for black and white tiles laid out in chequered pattern.

 

TFL

Happy new year to all.

 

Badder

Edited by Badder

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Hi Badder and a Very happy New Year to you! Hope you and yours are keeping well.

I have to say I have been dropping into your thread occasionally over the past couple of months but there's usually so much happened I didn't know where to start with my comments about it all! However - when I saw my email notification for your last post above and the photos it contained I knew I had something I wanted to say:

I think the brickwork and overall effects on the chimney column - in the middle three photos is seriously some of the best brickwork and weathering I have ever seen! I glanced at in my email I thought it was photos of an actual chimney! Beautifully done!

Kind regards,

Stix

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35 minutes ago, PlaStix said:

Hi Badder and a Very happy New Year to you! Hope you and yours are keeping well.

I have to say I have been dropping into your thread occasionally over the past couple of months but there's usually so much happened I didn't know where to start with my comments about it all! However - when I saw my email notification for your last post above and the photos it contained I knew I had something I wanted to say:

I think the brickwork and overall effects on the chimney column - in the middle three photos is seriously some of the best brickwork and weathering I have ever seen! I glanced at in my email I thought it was photos of an actual chimney! Beautifully done!

Kind regards,

Stix

Hi Stix,

I'm still  not any better, but no worse, thanks for asking.  But this project keeps me from being bored to death sat at home all day!

The 'lol' by the way, was for your comment about email notifications.... you must get hundreds a day! But thanks for taking the time to look at mine and popping in here to comment.

 

As you probably know, I built the original chimney a couple of years ago and then decided not to use it as the fireplace was more suited to a castle banqueting hall than a farmhouse, but I thought it might come in handy in the future. So it's been rattling around in a spare's box for 2years, getting chipped, dirty, and losing some of the rendering. But I was always aware that this accidental damage and 'dirtification' over a long period would add to the realism. So, the chimney brest and stack that you see now are naturally weathered' sections of the old chimney chopped up and stuck together, and only the fireplace is freshly made. I doubt much of the detailing will get to be seen as there will be floor joists and floorboards for the room above, and a part-collapsed roof above that, but I couldn't just make a token fireplace. Peeking through the windows will probably give the best view of it. I am very pleased with how it's turned out though.

 

I've just printed off some chequerboard patterns on paper and will be making a tiled floor for that room. I'm going to stick them on FTINFBISS, scribe out the individual tiles and then varnish over them.  Obviously there will be a lot of debris, moss/algae etc on the floor, but I think the effect should be quite striking. Again, it's a shame it won't be in plain sight, but it'll be there.

 

Rearguards,

Badder

 

 

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Posted (edited)

I spent a day or so messing around with my wife's colour printer and images of chequered tiles off the internet. First, I printed off images of large black and large whtie tiles, but had to chop them up and stick them together to get an area large enough to cover the floor of the building's living room/kitchen. I tried gluing them to some FTINFBISS, but there were lots of air pockets underneath the paper and in the end I decided to learn how to use the printer properly and print off a sheet of tiles that would fit the floor in one go.  So, I did that, and used a different glue and that all worked. But then I wondered if the floor would look better with blue and white tiles. So I gave that a go as well. It was difficult to choose between the two, so I weathered both sets. Both looked fine, but in the end I plumped for the original black and white tiles. 

 

Here they are, coated with a fair bit of algae which will make them fataly slippery underfoot when wet.  I could gloss varnish the lot, what with the melting snow dripping from the roof etc, but I may try wet and dry patches and maybe even some puddles.

NopHU0i.jpg

 

I will be cutting the hearth into the floor, and once the chimney is fitted I'll be adding render to areas on the sides and blending that with the render on the walls.

jFHFpXs.jpg

 

My bro built himself a 3D printer a few years ago now, and I asked him, at the time, if it could print off a 1/35th stove. There weren't very many patterns around on the net back then, but he did find one. He warned me that it wasn't a very good pattern, and was in pretty low res, but he printed one off anyway. I wasn't impressed to be honest and consigned it to the spares box. Now I'm thinking it could sit next to the fireplace. I figure it will be good enough when seen through a window, and more importantly, so heavy that no beggar could drag it away when the building became derelict. 

 

 

It will sit on brickwork to the left of the fireplace, and pressed up against the outer wall. I'm going to make a stove pipe, but I'm not sure where to shove it ye. Any suggestions?

 

0dxlCHR.jpg

 

TFL

Badder

 

I'll be raising this up on brickwork.

 

 

TFL

Badder

Edited by Badder

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I took some sand paper to the stove and got rid of a lot of the printer lines in the plastic. I also added some red brick colour to some bits of rubble around the fireplace. I haven't provided photos for the stove because it won't really be seen, and neither have I provided photos of the red brick rubble around the fireplace because the camera is picking that red out and making it look like chunks of ruby, while everything else looks a very dull and uniform grey.

 

Next, I wanted to finally 'lock' the gable wall and the long side wall together at 90 degrees. Up until now there has been flex at the corner joint between the plastic and plaster gable wall, and the long FTINFBISS wall.  So, I had to trim the floor, and file and sand both the other (newest) long wall,  AND the gable wall to fit with the floor.  CA was then dribbled along the edges of the floor to seep in and fix the floor to the inside of the gable wall and the first long wall. Skirting boards were added and painted, as were the window frames and sills.

31bzdSB.jpg

 

 

Certain that everything now fits together well, I could finally add plaster of paris rendering to the two side walls and fill the cavity in the joint between the gable wall and the first long wall.  I also washed the skirting boards and window frames/sills with plaster dust to tone them down and scraped some bits of the gable wall back to reveal bare plaster.

eKtbnph.jpg

 

The newest long wall (RHS) is only dry-fitted and requires a lot more work.

apEeoda.jpg

 

 

The new plaster will get a few washes with burnt umber, antelope brown and black acrylic inks before being scraped back to reveal patches of bare plaster again.

 

TFL

Badder

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Hmmmmm ..... ponders.

 

I know it all looks rather slap-dash messy at the moment, but when it comes to buildings, and especially ruined ones, it really pays to be messy and a bit clumsy I think. Paint, wet plaster, and plaster dust get everywhere just as in real life, and accidental knocks, scrapes and scratches are realistic damage after all so I never worry about knocking off plaster, chipping paint and stonework and splitting wood etc. And all of this messiness adds layers and affects variation.  When I've sanded down that 'slapped on' plaster and have applied the washes and taken some of it back, it will look pretty good, I'm sure. This is always the best, most fun part of making buildings, I find.

 

I really like the chimney, and the red brickwork around the barn doors, and because of that I've now decided to add more red brickwork. So, expect to see patches of brickwork repairs dotted about the place, and a lot of the last room changing from brownstone to brickwork.

 

I'm also going to reduce the amount of roof tiles by a considerable amount. After dry-fitting roofs, I've come to the conclusion that the building looks much better 'opened up'. So, there'll be no 'almost intact' roof sections. They'll all be totally collapsed, or the skeletal remains of the rafters with just a few tiles left hanging here and there. And I've decided to have a lot more ivy growing over everything as well. Basically, I want  the building to look much older than it's currently heading.

 

TFL

Badder

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Posted (edited)

Work has continued on the inner walls of the accommodation section of the building.

 

The plaster of Paris rendering was smoothed down with a block of emery cloth, but not before the plaster was dampened to keep the dust levels down. This meant that the emery cloth clogged up very quickly, but an old scalpel blade was used to scrape the gunk from the cloth and keep the process going. I did not sand the plaster completely flat though. The idea was to create a layer of plaster with a maximum thickness, but with no minimum thickness., meaning that there should be depressions in it. Here's the first section of wall to be treated in this way:

czoOmvv.jpg

 

This was then given a wash with Burnt Umber acrylic Ink.

JveGpVo.jpg

 

And this was then given another going over with the block of Emery cloth:

c3S5fHc.jpg

 

 

Targeted washes of black ink were then applied to some of the deeper impressions, and again the plaster was sanded back a little way.

XRvpTy6.jpg

 

 

Then areas of plaster were chipped off to reveal the stonework underneath and washes with plaster dust followed.  Note that the edges of the chipped away sections were then protected with applications of medium CA.

1onobCJ.jpg

 

I then used a scalpel to 'pick out' fresh plaster.  The idea there was to create areas of plaster which, when given washes, would nevertheless remain cleaner than the rest. I also cut out a channel for the wooden floor beam and fitted that before dry-fitting the wall for the photos.

vTNlyLm.jpg

 

 

The wall opposite got the some of the same treatment, but with the addition of a length of skirting board. The top section of this bit of wall will require more modelling so I haven't been so fussy with it.

RZjDTwe.jpg

 

 

Scraping and sanding of the walls means that plaster dust fell onto the floor. I let this build up and occasionally went over it with a wet brush.  I will clean some tiles back more than others.

As I mentioned earlier, I had originally  intended to build a complete floor and a part collapsed roof above this room, so I wasn't too fussy with the detailing of things like the insides of the windows. Now that I've decided to open the whole area up, I feel that the windows aren't good enough, so I'm going to upgrade them with properly fitted 'glass' rather than just gluing it onto the backs of the frames.

zRL6aRE.jpg

 

TFL

Badder

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Badder

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B, sanding plaster?

Have you considered using plastic wrap and a weighted flat surface (hardboard, book, heavy thinggy, whatever ...) to smooth the stuff when wet?

 

Heavy flat thinggy

==========

Plastic wrap

===========

plaster

===========

Ground == wall

===========

Work-surface / support

 

You'd still have to clean up doors and windows - but catch them when the plaster is set but not yet hard.

The plastic wrap may give too smooth a finish - but you can rough it up

 

 

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I've been doing bits and pieces here and there, plus the usual faffing around with more washes everywhere.

 

I've broken up the flooring in the upstairs end room, and have had a go at collapsing what's left. In all probability this will evolve when the roof is collapsed on top of it,  but I'm quite happy with how things are at the moment.

WZV5KRb.jpg

 

HqDhhJI.jpg

The building has received its first all over plaster dust wash with selected areas taken back and darkened with black washes. This was just an experiment to see if it suggested wet wood and wall plaster. I think it's worked on the floorboards and some of the internal walls (which can't be seen here)

 

 

The observant will notice that I've chopped off the very large window that was at the back of the building on the RHS in this photo. I'm contemplating removing it completely completely and replacing it with red brick, and possibly collapsing whichever completely.

 

TFL

Badder

 

 

Edited by Badder

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11 hours ago, Robert Stuart said:

B, sanding plaster?

Have you considered using plastic wrap and a weighted flat surface (hardboard, book, heavy thinggy, whatever ...) to smooth the stuff when wet?

 

Heavy flat thinggy

==========

Plastic wrap

===========

plaster

===========

Ground == wall

===========

Work-surface / support

 

You'd still have to clean up doors and windows - but catch them when the plaster is set but not yet hard.

The plastic wrap may give too smooth a finish - but you can rough it up

 

 

Hi Robert,

 

I hope your new year is going well?

 

Certainly there are times when I want a perfectly flat smooth surface on my plaster casts and so I do press them when wet and in the mould, but the rustic building here demands rough and ready plastering/rendering. I find it much easier to let the plaster dry lumpy and uneven, colour it, and then sand it back a bit at a time, add more colour and sand again, etc, etc, as was shown in the photos. The finished effect, with what looks like the remains of white paint, or cleaner plaster on top of older paster,  is completely random and I think more realistic for it. I think it's far quicker and easier to slap some lumpy plaster on and sand it down to get a smooth surface with chips, holes, indents, and depressions in it, than it is to dig, cut, chip, sand and file all those things into a piece of flat plaster.

 

Rearguards,

Badder

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Hello B

Thank you, i hope this year is good for you.  I'm dealing with family issues, mainly admin after an eventful December.

 

The way you describe making your walls sounds much more fun than my approach, and has the virtue of being closer to 'nature'.

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On 1/10/2020 at 9:50 AM, Robert Stuart said:

Hello B

Thank you, i hope this year is good for you.  I'm dealing with family issues, mainly admin after an eventful December.

 

The way you describe making your walls sounds much more fun than my approach, and has the virtue of being closer to 'nature'.

Hi Robert,

Family issues are rarely a good thing, so I hope things get, or have been, sorted and you can relax.

 

Actually, I think your method would be the more natural; a nice smooth plastered wall, which then ages, with ccracks,hipping and flaking etc, whilst my method is an easy cheat.

 

Rearguards,

Badder

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I'm sure I'm not the only diorama-maker to suffer badly with that 'what looks good vs what looks right' problem.

I suffer from it constantly. It's why everything I do ends up being changed, in the sometimes incorrect belief that it will end up better.

 

Ever since making the chequered floor I've wanted to show it off. I think the contrasting tiles would make a nice little feature for the diorama, drawing the viewer's eye inside the building to see all of the architectural details that they might otherwise overlook. The problem is, in order to expose the floor I'd have to get rid of the roof and the floor above it. And where would all that debris end up under normal circumstances? Well, on the chequered floor! I did have the idea to maybe portray the building as having been 'cleaned out', the owner intending to rebuild it. Or to collapse that new wall and dormer window and leave the roof and upper floor intact. But I like the new wall and don't want to do that. So I've had to bite the bullet and forget about showing off the floor to that extent. Instead, I've returned to my original idea: that of portraying that section of the building with a part-collapsed roof and a part collapsed upper floor. So, the chequered floor will only be seen through the doorway and windows (just) and from directly above. Oh well.

 

So, first things first, to the upper floor and those floorboards I made way, way, way, back towards the start of this thread.

I first had to fit the floor to the building again, because the room has altered in dimension with the replacing of the side walls. I also had to cut out a section for the chimney brest. And I removed a floorboard, just to see if it was easy to do (the coffee stirrers are actually CA'd to each other on graph paper and then to coffee-stirrer joists.

H9bpxgu.jpg

 

 

More floorboards were removed and the floor and chimney dry-fitted.

bswKMHI.jpg

 

 

I also dry-fitted a section of roof tiles. These are some I made ages ago, but decided to scrap. They are here only for effect.

F18d0Zv.jpg

 

I shall have to check on whether I can make a fireplace for the top room, using the same chimney. Phsyics may say it's not possible, or is possible but dangerous to life. I don't know.

Until then, I think I can now move back to the roof.

 

TFL

Badder

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Badder

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