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Really superb modelling.  Very impressive! :worthy:

Kind regards,

Stix 

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Here is yours truly working on the "Keepers of the Flame 1919-1929." diorama. It gives you a better sense of 1:16th scale.

 

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I had always heard that 1:16 was considered Museum Scale whatever that is. I think that it is referred to the best scale for display in a museum setting, neither too small or too large. Space is always a problem in most museums. My use of 1/16th scale was strictly by accident as I had no ambition to show my stuff.

I was in a hobby store one day that sold both models and dollhouse stuff. I got to thinking why not adapt the two together and call it a hanger. It was later that I saw that Model Airways was offering WW1 kits in this scale and calling them "museum scale". So  I decided that I would be building in this scale from then on. My first diorama was made using this scale for the Albatros. I was in the process of building this kit when I discovered that I didn't like the fittings. as the metal was too soft. I realized that the undercarriage legs were even unable to hold the weight of the airplane. What to do? A stand-alone model was out of the question. Then it hit me maybe I should try the diorama idea I had before. (I eventually made brass inserts for the legs). I have been doing them ever since.

Edited by John W Reid

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On 4/30/2018 at 3:15 PM, goggsy said:

Spectacular work, really looks the business the way you’ve shot it as well.

Thank you goggsy Cheers! John.

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Nearing completion of diorama 1.Actually, this diorama was built in two stages. The hanger first and later the exterior.

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Nearing completion! the righthand side of the diorama I left it open for the viewer, actually in this area there would have been another hangar bay with another aircraft in it. The roof  I partially left open for the same purpose. I know that the hangar looks flimsy but that is the way they were made probably for easy teardown if the front moved before it bogged down in trench warfare.

Edited by John W Reid

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On 5/2/2018 at 2:08 PM, PlaStix said:

Really superb modelling.  Very impressive! :worthy:

Kind regards,

Stix 

Thank you I love doing this stuff.Cheers! John.

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John..

 

 

Love this very much.. EXTRAORDINARY work from you.

 

OUTSTANDING and always a pleasure to watch your work/builds/diorama.

 

STUNNING   :wub:  

 

Followed it diligently over on ARC  and LSP.

 

:wow:  :mike:

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Thank you, Houston. I will post more pics for you here. This is the only site that I post now as it got a little overwhelming at times posting to all those sites.

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This pic pretty much tells the story of Canadian aviation after the war a lot of it accomplished by the Jenny Canuck. Here Billy Bishop is welcoming some of his American fellow fighter pilots from the war. It is in the early 1920s and they are in town for remembrance day and are in full uniform for the occasion. It is just after the parade in town and they are having a little get together at a hangar where they are rebuilding an old Jenny. Most pilots in North America got their first training on the Jenny.

From my diorama "Keepers of the Flame 1919-1920."

Edited by John W Reid

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In this pic a Jenny Canuck is being re-built using parts from a JN4 which is just visible in the background. The Canuck was a different airplane as it had no downward thrust to the engine as well as re-designed tail which was made of wood, not steel.

From my diorama "Keepers of the Flame."

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