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1/72 Italeri Messerschmitt ME-210 A1 Hungarian


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Messerschmitt ME-210 A1 in 1/72 by Italeri

 

Here is my finished 1/72 Italeri Messerschmitt ME-210 A1 finished in Hungarian Air Force colors, using the Print Scale Decals sheet number 72-298

The Italeri kit was lovely to build as was the Print Scale decal sheet to use.

I hope you all like it.  I tried to fix the aerial with black cotton and glue didn't quite work and may well unpick it and have another go, I find that you cannot pull tight the cotton, any ideas please.

Thank you Colin.

 

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Nice to see an Me 410 A-1 in Hungarian colours! Well done!

 

The ultimate answer to antennas is, I think, some sort of elastic line:

https://www.uschivdr.com/products-in-detail/rigging/

 

There's also another modelling elastic, called EZLine, but it's got a flat cross section and is more suitable to airfoil shaped rigging.

 

Kind regards,

 

Joachim

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20 hours ago, Eric Mc said:

Nice. I have one of those to build. Good to know it goes together well as I have one to build.

 

I wonder how much the Hungarians appreciated their 210 hand-me-downs.

Thank you !

 

Probably as much as the Luftwaffe wanted to get rid of them ?

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19 hours ago, Spitfire31 said:

Nice to see an Me 410 A-1 in Hungarian colours! Well done!

 

The ultimate answer to antennas is, I think, some sort of elastic line:

https://www.uschivdr.com/products-in-detail/rigging/

 

There's also another modelling elastic, called EZLine, but it's got a flat cross section and is more suitable to airfoil shaped rigging.

 

Kind regards,

 

Joachim

Hi Joachim,

 

Thank you very much for your comments and link, the video was very interesting and I think that is the answer.

Also I will have to buy some EZLine when my funds permit.

 

My next build is already under way.

Best regards

Colin.

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15 hours ago, Corsairfoxfouruncle said:

Good looking 210 👍 in alternative markings. 

Thank you Sir !

And if I can get another of this kit it will be finished in yet more different markings.

 

Best regards

Colin.

Edited by Colin1967
Poor grammar
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Hello Colin,

 

I really like your build! Well done.

The only 210 (or is it a 410?) I have, is the old Frog kit.... Daunting doesn't even start to describe it!

 

One method you may use, and which will cost you nothing, is stretched sprue.

Use a length of sprue from your model, approx. 10 cm long, and heat it up over a candle. When the sprue start to get soft in the area over the flame, pull at both end until you have a long, thin length of plastic. Do not bring it too close from the flame!

Only one way for this to work; practice, practice, and then more practice! But it is fun to see how quickly you progress!

So the more you pull, the thinner the plastic filament will be. Once you are happy that it is thin enough, stop and let it cool down.

Then you can color it with a water proof marker (better than paint, as it does not thicken the plastic).

Then cut a length slightly superior to the length of the needed aerial.

Glue one side with a tiny drop of CA glue, then pull gently when dry and repeat the operation at the other end. Trim the excess with a sharp scalpel/razor blade.

If the line is slightly sagging, approach a burnt match, extinguished but still glowing, right underneath the line, and it will tighten really nicely.

Whatever you do, do not touch the line with the match!!!!

 

Well try that. It is free if you have old sprue from a built model, and it is easy when all is said and done!

 

Have fun!!!

 

JR

Edited by jean
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On 4/12/2018 at 6:38 PM, jean said:

Hello Colin,

 

I really like your build! Well done.

The only 210 (or is it a 410?) I have, is the old Frog kit.... Daunting doesn't even start to describe it!

 

One method you may use, and which will cost you nothing, is stretched sprue.

Use a length of sprue from your model, approx. 10 cm long, and heat it up over a candle. When the sprue start to get soft in the area over the flame, pull at both end until you have a long, thin length of plastic. Do not bring it too close from the flame!

Only one way for this to work; practice, practice, and then more practice! But it is fun to see how quickly you progress!

So the more you pull, the thinner the plastic filament will be. Once you are happy that it is thin enough, stop and let it cool down.

Then you can color it with a water proof marker (better than paint, as it does not thicken the plastic).

Then cut a length slightly superior to the length of the needed aerial.

Glue one side with a tiny drop of CA glue, then pull gently when dry and repeat the operation at the other end. Trim the excess with a sharp scalpel/razor blade.

If the line is slightly sagging, approach a burnt match, extinguished but still glowing, right underneath the line, and it will tighten really nicely.

Whatever you do, do not touch the line with the match!!!!

 

Well try that. It is free if you have old sprue from a built model, and it is easy when all is said and done!

 

Have fun!!!

 

JR

 

On 4/12/2018 at 7:25 PM, ColinChipmunkfan said:

Hello Colin, I always use stretched sprue  as described by Jean - no cost just use a heated pin to tension up the line , Colin

Hello Jean and Colin,

 

I much appreciate your advice, thank you !  I have tried this method and need to practice it more and yes I will be careful as not burn the stretched sprue.

I do have access to a soldering iron and wonder if the same principal in using a hot pin would work and again I suspect I need to be careful as not to burn the cotton, I will try it tomorrow and see what happens.

 

Best regards

Colin. 

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Great you are trying the stretched sprue.

A soldering iron may be a bit too hot, unless it is a small one.

But beware: this is not going to work with cotton! No way a cotton fiber will get taught if heated up locally. Only polystyrene sprue!

 

JR

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Hi Jean,

 

I forgot to reply to your comment on the FROG kit, I hadn't realized they even released one, I must confess at not being an modeller, I am rather a kit builder but, still enjoy myself constructing them, I also only use traditional tools and a paint brush and a quite happy with my results and I look /ask for advice on here and find the responses to any questions posted by me are answered in a helpful and friendly manner.  I also marvel at the wonderfully built models being posted on here.

 

Your advice is much appreciated,

Regards Colin.

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  • 2 weeks later...

....and I found this way to make my antenna wires  and bi-plane rigging.I use ez line nowadays.it is not really cheap ,but you get over thirtyy meters....o wait ,300 feet-. you can buy it via ebay or look with google for the cheapest shop [I bought my latest in denmark! postage was very reasonable]. if you have a train on the attic,you can use it for making fences ,telephone wires and everything else your phantasy might come up with. it is very easy to work with ,in a matter of seconds you have an antenna wire [rigging a bi-plane ,not to mention rigging a ship [it is beautifull on ships!but than it is not easy.on ships I mean .look for an example with google!] will take considerably more time,but the the results can be great .it doesn't break and drooping is gone forever! the man in the clip tells  quite a long story I think ,but will make things very clear https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pGYk68t6iFI    maybe better to start with this clip https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8nymuYSMms

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Just a quick note about stretching sprue.

Once you have softened the plastic over a candle flame (it will take practice to decide when it is soft enough) take it away from the flame, before you start to pull the ends apart.  I don't think anyone has mentioned that.  In my experience, if you try to stretch it while keeping it over the flame it will break.

With practice I have been able to roughly tune the thickness of the stretched sprue, depending on how much time you wait between taking the sprue away from the heat and starting to stretch it.  If you do it in quick time the sprue will be vey thin, whereas it can be slightly thicker if you let it cool a little before stretching.  For sure, it takes a little practice and experimentation, but it is a most useful technique to learn.

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21 hours ago, Emily-Emma silverscreen said:

....and I found this way to make my antenna wires  and bi-plane rigging.I use ez line nowadays.it is not really cheap ,but you get over thirtyy meters....o wait ,300 feet-. you can buy it via ebay or look with google for the cheapest shop [I bought my latest in denmark! postage was very reasonable]. if you have a train on the attic,you can use it for making fences ,telephone wires and everything else your phantasy might come up with. it is very easy to work with ,in a matter of seconds you have an antenna wire [rigging a bi-plane ,not to mention rigging a ship [it is beautifull on ships!but than it is not easy.on ships I mean .look for an example with google!] will take considerably more time,but the the results can be great .it doesn't break and drooping is gone forever! the man in the clip tells  quite a long story I think ,but will make things very clear https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pGYk68t6iFI    maybe better to start with this clip https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8nymuYSMms

Good evening,

 

Many thanks for the additional advice and youtube link which I have watched, most interesting !  I think that at the moment I will have to 'stick' :) with the stretched sprue due to unexpected circumstances, also I will be posting many finished models over the coming months because of it.

The model shop in Denmark you bought from is very reasonable and gives a good service, his decals are very good assuming it's the same one I know.

 

Best regards

Colin.

P.S: Apologies for delay in replying as I am sure I didn't get the notification of your post.

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10 hours ago, kapam said:

Just a quick note about stretching sprue.

Once you have softened the plastic over a candle flame (it will take practice to decide when it is soft enough) take it away from the flame, before you start to pull the ends apart.  I don't think anyone has mentioned that.  In my experience, if you try to stretch it while keeping it over the flame it will break.

With practice I have been able to roughly tune the thickness of the stretched sprue, depending on how much time you wait between taking the sprue away from the heat and starting to stretch it.  If you do it in quick time the sprue will be vey thin, whereas it can be slightly thicker if you let it cool a little before stretching.  For sure, it takes a little practice and experimentation, but it is a most useful technique to learn.

Good evening Kapam,

 

Many thanks for your post and additional information it's much appreciated and I didn't seem to get the notification that you had commented on my request.

I realize that from your response that's where I have been going wrong, in not removing the softened plastic away from the heat.  As seen above I now have plenty of time to practice the art due to an unexpected event today and to build many more models from my collection over the coming months.  So, hopefully I will be an expert in rigging soon...

 

Best regards

From Colin.

 

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