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corsaircorp

Ballroom brawlers ! Need more blue in my cabinet ! F6F

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Hello @Grey Beema

Have a look at this pic, I saw it on FB but my only way to share was to take a pic from the screen.

Interesting, did you know this pic ?

At first sight, I thinked about Tungsten, Corsair and Barracuda in ETO markings

Then the Martlet and the Tarpon say no !!

Let me know what do you think about.

WP_20181011_12_49_34_Pro

Sincerely.

CC

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21 minutes ago, corsaircorp said:

Hello @Grey Beema

Have a look at this pic, I saw it on FB but my only way to share was to take a pic from the screen.

Interesting, did you know this pic ?

At first sight, I thinked about Tungsten, Corsair and Barracuda in ETO markings

Then the Martlet and the Tarpon say no !!

Let me know what do you think about.

WP_20181011_12_49_34_Pro

Sincerely.

CC

Interesting photo which I think warrants some research.  I think there might have been Martlets on one of the Tirpitz raids but I'm not sure.  The addition of the Tarpon has thrown me though.

 

Hopefully someone with a bit of knowledge will be along soon to put us out of put misery....

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From the Wikipedia entry on “Operation Tungsten”

 

The attack was launched during the early hours of 3 April. All the airmen were woken shortly after midnight, and attended a final briefing from 1:15 am. The aircraft to be used in the strike were armed at this time, with all of the bombs being marked with messages for Tirpitzin chalk. The aircrew began boarding their aircraft at 4:00 am and flying-off operations started 15 minutes later; at this time the warships were 120 miles (190 km) from Kaafjord. Ten Corsairs drawn from 1834 and 1836 Naval Air Squadrons were the first aircraft to be launched and were followed by the 21 Barracudas of 8 Wing; 827 Squadron was launched from Victorious and 830 Squadron departed from Furious. Seven of the Barracudas were armed with a 1,600-pound bomb, and the remainder carried multiple 500 or 600-pound weapons. Once the Barracudas were airborne the remaining escort fighters – 30 Wildcats and Hellcats from 800, 881and 882 Naval Air Squadrons  – were launched. All the aircraft of the first wave were dispatched successfully, and the force completed forming up at 4:37 am.[45][50][51][52] Flying conditions remained perfect, and German forces had not detected the British fleet during its approach.[47]

Barracudas flying over a fjord shortly before attacking Tirpitz

The first wave headed for Norway at low altitude, flying just 50 feet (15 m) above the sea to avoid detection by German radar. The aircraft began to climb to a higher altitude when they reached a point 20 miles (32 km) from the coast, and had reached 7,000 feet (2,100 m) by the time they made landfall at 5:08 am. The force approached Altenfjordfrom the west, passing over the western end of Langfjord before turning south, then looping to the north and attacking the battleship over the hills on the southern shore of Kaafjord shortly before 5:30 am.[53]

The arrival of the British force caught Tirpitz by surprise. While the aircraft had first been picked up by a German radar station shortly after they crossed the Norwegian coastline, the battleship was not immediately warned.[54] At the time of the attack Tirpitz was preparing to sail for her high-speed trials, and her crew were busy unmooring the vessel. Her five protective destroyers had already departed for the trials area in Stjern Sound.[55] The warning from the radar station arrived shortly before the British aircraft appeared over Kaafjord, and the battleship's crew were still in the process of moving to their battle stations when the attack commenced; at this time not all of the watertight doors were closed and some damage-control stations were not fully manned.[53][56]

As planned, the British raid began with Hellcat and Wildcat fighters strafing Tirpitz's anti-aircraft guns and batteries located on the shore; this attack inflicted heavy casualties on the battleship's gunners, disabled her main anti-aircraft control centre and damaged several guns.[

 

Im not sure how accurate this is  but it will hopefully point you into the right direction for searches. I built a Martlet V last year and did it in the markings for this raid. 

 

Dennis

Edited by Corsairfoxfouruncle

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11 hours ago, Corsairfoxfouruncle said:

From the Wikipedia entry on “Operation Tungsten”

 

The attack was launched during the early hours of 3 April. All the airmen were woken shortly after midnight, and attended a final briefing from 1:15 am. The aircraft to be used in the strike were armed at this time, with all of the bombs being marked with messages for Tirpitzin chalk. The aircrew began boarding their aircraft at 4:00 am and flying-off operations started 15 minutes later; at this time the warships were 120 miles (190 km) from Kaafjord. Ten Corsairs drawn from 1834 and 1836 Naval Air Squadrons were the first aircraft to be launched and were followed by the 21 Barracudas of 8 Wing; 827 Squadron was launched from Victorious and 830 Squadron departed from Furious. Seven of the Barracudas were armed with a 1,600-pound bomb, and the remainder carried multiple 500 or 600-pound weapons. Once the Barracudas were airborne the remaining escort fighters – 30 Wildcats and Hellcats from 800, 881and 882 Naval Air Squadrons  – were launched. All the aircraft of the first wave were dispatched successfully, and the force completed forming up at 4:37 am.[45][50][51][52] Flying conditions remained perfect, and German forces had not detected the British fleet during its approach.[47]

Barracudas flying over a fjord shortly before attacking Tirpitz

The first wave headed for Norway at low altitude, flying just 50 feet (15 m) above the sea to avoid detection by German radar. The aircraft began to climb to a higher altitude when they reached a point 20 miles (32 km) from the coast, and had reached 7,000 feet (2,100 m) by the time they made landfall at 5:08 am. The force approached Altenfjordfrom the west, passing over the western end of Langfjord before turning south, then looping to the north and attacking the battleship over the hills on the southern shore of Kaafjord shortly before 5:30 am.[53]

The arrival of the British force caught Tirpitz by surprise. While the aircraft had first been picked up by a German radar station shortly after they crossed the Norwegian coastline, the battleship was not immediately warned.[54] At the time of the attack Tirpitz was preparing to sail for her high-speed trials, and her crew were busy unmooring the vessel. Her five protective destroyers had already departed for the trials area in Stjern Sound.[55] The warning from the radar station arrived shortly before the British aircraft appeared over Kaafjord, and the battleship's crew were still in the process of moving to their battle stations when the attack commenced; at this time not all of the watertight doors were closed and some damage-control stations were not fully manned.[53][56]

As planned, the British raid began with Hellcat and Wildcat fighters strafing Tirpitz's anti-aircraft guns and batteries located on the shore; this attack inflicted heavy casualties on the battleship's gunners, disabled her main anti-aircraft control centre and damaged several guns.[

 

Im not sure how accurate this is  but it will hopefully point you into the right direction for searches. I built a Martlet V last year and did it in the markings for this raid. 

 

Dennis

Hello Cousin,

Could you show up your Martlet ?

There has been Tungsten, then other operations that followed a similar pattern until Goodwood in wich they were Fireflies !

But I did'nt hear from Tarpon in any of these ops ??

Now for Goodwood, AFAIK there was no more Corsairs since they have departed for far east ops.

That's why I still stick to Tungsten...

Now this pic may came from a ferry operation or a training…???

Sincerely.

CC

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Such a cluster of different types suggest a photo-opportunity rather than an operation.  I'm not sure that a Life photographer would have been taken on operations.

 

The Avenger being unable to dive-bomb nor carry the British torpedo, they were initially used as ant-submarine aircraft rather than on strikes.  As such, they may well have been on the carriers for these operations - or at least it can't be ruled out without further research.  The code 3N on the Corsair is odd, 3 being carried by a bomber aircraft unit rather than a fighter unit, which would normally carry 6,7 etc.  Again, hinting at a non-operational trip to sea.

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41 minutes ago, corsaircorp said:

Could you show up your Martlet ?

 

Hello Cousin ... Here are a few photo’s. I can take more if you would like the Martelet is still on display in my office. 

fjbwOIS.jpg

8nSAeau.jpg

Cl8Akqe.jpg

rSIDQTL.jpg

I know shes not 100% correct i used the closest paints and i tried to get them as close as possible. I also added a name to the plane that isn't correct but i like to give my planes some personality. I used the womans name to give the the impression it was the pilots wife or girl back home. 

 

Dennis

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Given the number of onlookers, maybe trials to see if various types fitted the lift? The Barra looks a bit tight...

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Hello cousin, i have done some researching on the raid on Tirpitz. I found this archive for you as well. http://www.royalnavyresearcharchive.org.uk/SQUADRONS/896_Squadron.htm#.W8ChbNNOnYU

I hope this helps. I looked up Operation Tungsten martlet units on Google and was referred to #’s 896 & 898 Squadrons. I took some screen shots of certain pages from the archive. One for 896 reads.

 

TVGebCi.png

pZcptGB.png

This one for 898 Squadron.

tHWzSx7.png

Q19LWjl.png

Again I hope this helps you. I believe my Martlet V is from HMS Pursuer if my memory is correct ? 

 

Dennis

Edited by Corsairfoxfouruncle

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I will make a couple of observations about the main photograph.

Is that a wooden planked deck? 

If so, didn't the Fleet Carries (HMS Furious & HMS Victorious) have steel decks that were not planked - so is this an Escort carrier not a fleet carrier? 

 

What Escort carriers did the Corsairs operate from for Tungsten? 

HMS Emperor - Hellcats

HMS Fencer - Swordfish & Wildcats

HMS Persuer - Wildcats

HMS Searcher - Wildcats

 

Also there is a second Barracuda parked to the right of the Martlet (you can just see its wing tip).

 

I am also not sure this is a Tungsten Picture..

 

However HMS Nabob & HMS Trumpeter who were involved in Goodwood both had Tarpons/Avengers for mine laying and Wildcats. 

HMS Formidable carried 30 Corsairs & Barracudas but no Tarpons/Avengers (needs confirmation as this is a Wiki source). 

 

Suprisingly to me (I looked it up earlier) the Tarpon went into action with the FAA a couple of months before the Barracuda - Now who would have thought that...

 

 

 

 

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Some nice details in this picture - who amongst us added exhaust stains to underneath the Barracuda's wings?

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