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I'm currently building a 1/350 HMS Dreadnought in a dry dock diorama.

 

I'd like to add some colour with flags and I've seen pics taken from the head of the dock with of the Union Jack still flying as she's moving into the drydock but I'm not sure when they'd be struck. The diorama has the dock drained - any chance the flags would still be flying?

 

Any ideas or help gratefully received.

 

Cheers

 

Nick

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In the mid 80's in refit in the sheds at Devonport we flew Ensign & Jack and observed morning & evening colours. I'm pretty sure we also dressed ship for the royal wedding of Andrew & Fergie.

I was a Sparker & not a Bunting so some of it was "not my problem" but I'm fairly sure the Jack was flown at the bow only when tied up or at anchor. The Ensign could be flown from either the stern or main mast, except at flying stations obviously.

Various signal flags & pennants would be flown depending on what the ship was doing; diver's down, ammunitioning etc. I do remember practicing to dress ship & having them all up so the Chief Yeoman could inspect them.

I'm sure you could imagine a situation that would require flags & pennants being flown, but the "flying stations" hoist might not work!

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It is very much as Phil describes Nick; however there are circumstances, when the ship is classed as Out of Routine, in which case she flies the 'Port Flag' - red and white vertical bars.   Another set of flags which can usually be seen in port, but probably not in dry-dock is Romeo Yankee; which mean "keep away from ship/my side"  These three flags appear like this:

out_of_routine_romeo-yankee.jpg

 

 

Note in this image of HMS Diomede, the Port Flag, plus Romeo Yankee hoisted below it,  being flown at the yardarm (Romeo is barely visible).  In these cases, the White Ensign is still flown but the Jack can be optional. See section.5 below

diomede_out_of_routine.jpg

 

 

   5.Ships Out of Routine.  (extract from Standards, flags and colours. at MoD Navy)
 Ships undergoing maintenance, modernisation, conversion,refit or extended docking in one of HM Naval Bases or contractor’s yards may, subject to the approval of the local Naval Base Commander,  request  to go out of routine and, as such, be exempt from the requirement to wear the Jack. Such ships are to indicate their special condition by flying the Port Flag (vertical red and white stripes) at the port outer yardarm by day and night. A White Masthead pennant is still to be worn.
 
HTH
 
Mike

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Thanks both, food for thought!

 

Cheers

 

Nick

On ‎20‎/‎03‎/‎2018 at 7:27 PM, phildagreek said:

In the mid 80's in refit in the sheds at Devonport we flew Ensign & Jack and observed morning & evening colours. I'm pretty sure we also dressed ship for the royal wedding of Andrew & Fergie.

I was a Sparker & not a Bunting so some of it was "not my problem" but I'm fairly sure the Jack was flown at the bow only when tied up or at anchor. The Ensign could be flown from either the stern or main mast, except at flying stations obviously.

Various signal flags & pennants would be flown depending on what the ship was doing; diver's down, ammunitioning etc. I do remember practicing to dress ship & having them all up so the Chief Yeoman could inspect them.

I'm sure you could imagine a situation that would require flags & pennants being flown, but the "flying stations" hoist might not work!

 

On ‎20‎/‎03‎/‎2018 at 8:47 PM, bootneck said:

It is very much as Phil describes Nick; however there are circumstances, when the ship is classed as Out of Routine, in which case she flies the 'Port Flag' - red and white vertical bars.   Another set of flags which can usually be seen in port, but probably not in dry-dock is Romeo Yankee; which mean "keep away from ship/my side"  These three flags appear like this:

out_of_routine_romeo-yankee.jpg

 

 

Note in this image of HMS Diomede, the Port Flag, plus Romeo Yankee hoisted below it,  being flown at the yardarm (Romeo is barely visible).  In these cases, the White Ensign is still flown but the Jack can be optional. See section.5 below

diomede_out_of_routine.jpg

 

 

   5.Ships Out of Routine.  (extract from Standards, flags and colours. at MoD Navy)
 Ships undergoing maintenance, modernisation, conversion,refit or extended docking in one of HM Naval Bases or contractor’s yards may, subject to the approval of the local Naval Base Commander,  request  to go out of routine and, as such, be exempt from the requirement to wear the Jack. Such ships are to indicate their special condition by flying the Port Flag (vertical red and white stripes) at the port outer yardarm by day and night. A White Masthead pennant is still to be worn.
 
HTH
 
Mike

 

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Followed the link to "Standards, flags and colours", which begins: "This chapter has been diversity and inclusion impact assessed by the sponsor in accordance with Departmental policy. No direct discrimination or adverse impact was identified."

 

Well that's all right then.  Our fleet may no longer be capable of defending us against attack from a determined rowing boat but at least our flags policy is diversity-compliant.  Which is of course The Main Thing.  Ye gods!

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