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HI All

 

Does anyone know the prop diameter of the Dove? Did it change much with the Riley conversion? try to source some decent aftermarket so any help would be appreciated.

 

Cheers
Tony

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  • 2 months later...

While the diameter may not have changed much, the rotation is opposite. On the standard aeroplane, when you're standing in front of it, the props turn clockwise, as with the props of most British, French and Russian-designed aero engines. On the Riley with its Lycoming engines rotation is in the standard US direction, anticlockwise as viewed from the front.

 

*Edited because when I typed this I got clockwise and anticlockwise the wrong way round, thanks to Eugenio for catching it*

Edited by Work In Progress
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15 hours ago, Work In Progress said:

While the diameter may not have changed much, the rotation is opposite. On the standard aeroplane, when you're standing in front of it, the props turn anticlockwise, as with the props of most British, French and Russian-designed aero engines. On the Riley with its Lycoming engines rotation is in the standard US direction, clockwise as viewed from the front.

Hi, W.i.P.

I'm afraid things are just opposite.
Take a look to this pics. Just wanted to prevent possible mistakes.

Best regards

Converted Dove - Original Dove (don't know why, but you need to right click and open in another window, by me at least)

Eugenio

 

Edited by 72linerlover
typo
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Looking at those pics , the props do rotate the opposite way. Standard Dove has clockwise and Riley dove anti clockwise.

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Yeah, he's correct though in that I got my clockwise and anticlockwise the wrong way around.

Pretty stupid, huh? Especially given the number of Chipmunk and Tiger Moth props I've swung over the years.

 

Have edited my earlier post to prevent later confusion of future readers.

 

Anyway, the point remains that you need props that go the other war round from those on the standard aeroplane if you're modelling a Riley.

Edited by Work In Progress
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To find two 3 blades propellers of the proper size, you can look for a Revell (ex Matchbox) 1/72 DO 28 Skyservant.
Both propellers are by Hartzell.
DOVE: HC-3MVK-2A
DO 28: HC-3MVK-2C; no size difference.
It sholud easy to find a cheap second (or third) hand DO 28, not really a best seller.
Anyway I seem to recall that there is also a full resin Dove Riley kit, perhaps by Magna, but have no idea of its quality.

 

At this point I don't know if our friend Tony is still interested in this topic, since more than two months are gone, but perhaps for general knowledge...

Best regards

Eugenio

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  • 1 year later...

Back from the dead...

 

Im building the 1/48 Magna models and the props are not so good...

 

any chance for a 1/48 prop that looks like the doves?

 

thanks.

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On 5/22/2018 at 11:44 AM, Work In Progress said:

Yeah, he's correct though in that I got my clockwise and anticlockwise the wrong way around.

Pretty stupid, huh? Especially given the number of Chipmunk and Tiger Moth props I've swung over the years.

 

Have edited my earlier post to prevent later confusion of future readers.

 

Anyway, the point remains that you need props that go the other war round from those on the standard aeroplane if you're modelling a Riley.

Not really,  if I undertand correctly, prop rotation (clockwise or counter-clockwise) is determined in almost all written sources as being from the cockpit looking forward- I had to be careful when reading prop rotation in written articles to see when the rotation was labeled, from what viewpoint the direction was...IIRC, in the UK, it's based on the rotation as seen from the cockpit. ("I'll take prop rotation trivia for 500, Alex!") I always look at photos of the prop and look at the leading edge of a blade to determine rotation for certain.

Mike

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TBH in 45 years of actual aviation in the UK, as opposed to modelling, I have not heard people refer to clockwise or anticlockwise rotation at all.
In the realm of full size aviation it's either a right foot aeroplane (US standard rotation) or a left foot aeroplane (UK / French / Russian standard rotation). 

In the realm of flying models it's either a tractor prop (US standard rotation) or a pusher prop acting as a tractor (UK / French / Russian standard rotation). 

Edited by Work In Progress
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I suggest this is from the viewpoint of the pilot, who is more interested in what he has to do than the engineering of why he has to do it.  The engineer who designed the aircraft doesn't really care about which foot the pilot has to use, but does require a term that is rather more useful in describing the mechanical and aerodynamic results of the prop whizzing round.  Horses for courses.

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